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South Africa Laws

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NEWS
April 3, 1989 | SCOTT KRAFT, Times Staff Writer
As the evening deadline loomed, editors at the Natal Witness carefully studied a photograph of 6-year-old Victoria Gasa. The black girl's right eye, injured when she tripped while fleeing an outbreak of political violence, was swollen shut. Her baby sister was in her arms. The photo would convey, in a way that words could not, the human toll of four years of bloody fighting in the black townships around this tranquil farming community. But some of the editors were afraid to use it.
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WORLD
November 22, 2011 | By Robyn Dixon, Los Angeles Times
The ruling African National Congress pushed a secrecy law through Parliament on Tuesday over the objections of Nobel laureates, opposition politicians and editors who complained that it will have a chilling effect on whistle-blowers and investigative journalism in a country rife with corruption. Critics said the law, which makes it illegal to reveal state secrets, lacks a provision allowing a legal defense for acting in the public interest by exposing criminality, corruption or incompetence.
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NEWS
June 20, 1990 | From Associated Press
Parliament on Tuesday repealed a major apartheid law used for decades to segregate South Africa's public facilities ranging from restaurants to libraries to buses. The repeal of the Separate Amenities Act was the latest in a series of reforms by President Frederik W. de Klerk since he came to power last year. The changes have angered conservative whites, who oppose the idea of sharing power with the black majority.
NEWS
April 19, 2001 | From Associated Press
Pharmaceutical giants entered settlement talks with the government Wednesday, signaling that they are dropping their fight against a law that could provide cheaper versions of AIDS drugs to millions of South Africans. The firms' lawsuit, postponed until today as the discussions continued, has deeply embarrassed the drug companies since hearings began six weeks ago. Many of them have responded by drastically cutting prices on their own.
NEWS
June 18, 1991 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Population Registration Act, the legal foundation of apartheid, was formally repealed by the white-controlled Parliament on Monday, ending four decades of cradle-to-grave racial labeling in South Africa. The notorious statute, the last of the pillars of apartheid to fall this month, was the building block for hundreds of laws that have protected privilege for 4.5 million whites and denied the vote and other democratic rights to 28 million blacks. President Frederik W.
NEWS
November 12, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
South Africa's Parliament approved the first major post-apartheid law giving thousands of blacks stripped of their land under apartheid three years to reclaim it. The Restitution of Land Rights Bill is the first legislation implementing President Nelson Mandela's pre-election promise to redress the wrongs of nearly 46 years of apartheid. The bill needs only Mandela's signature to put it on the statute books. It provides for a land claims court and a commission on the restitution of land rights.
NEWS
June 6, 1991 | From Associated Press
Parliament on Wednesday abolished major apartheid laws that had banned blacks from owning land in most of South Africa and segregated all neighborhoods by race since 1950. The new bill, the Abolition of Racially Based Land Measures, ends the legal segregation of neighborhoods and replaces laws that reserved 87% of South African land for the white minority.
NEWS
July 11, 1991 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush's decision to lift U.S. sanctions was heralded Wednesday by government officials and business people across South Africa as the most important step toward international acceptance for Pretoria in more than four decades. The Johannesburg Stock Exchange soared to a new high, the special exchange rate that lures foreign investors to ignore sanctions sank to new lows and business leaders predicted that the beginning of the country's economic recovery is near.
NEWS
March 13, 1991 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In what President Frederik W. de Klerk called "a turning point in the history of South Africa," the government on Tuesday unveiled detailed plans to abolish laws that have segregated housing and restricted black ownership of land for 78 years. But the government immediately drew sharp criticism from anti-apartheid leaders for deciding that, "in the interests of peace and progress," it would not return land to the 3.5 million blacks forcibly removed from their property over the years.
NEWS
May 1, 1991 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Twenty-five years have passed, but Amina Ebrahim still remembers the day that six of apartheid's social engineers showed up on her doorstep to kick her out of her house. She offered them tea and comfortable chairs. "You are welcome in my family's home," she told them. "But I don't want to hear what you have to say." Ebrahim would cling to that house for 15 years as, block by block, the vibrant, multiracial community called District Six was plowed under to make way for whites.
NEWS
October 10, 1998 | From Associated Press
Apartheid-era laws banning homosexual relations were struck down Friday by South Africa's highest court, which ruled that men convicted of sodomy since 1994 could demand monetary damages and have their criminal records cleared. The constitutional court's decision formalized guarantees granted in 1994, when white minority rule ended and a provisional constitution banned discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation, race or gender.
NEWS
September 16, 1995 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pope John Paul II may find a discordant note in the welcoming fanfare when he arrives here today on his first pastoral visit. For while the Pope is expected during his three-day visit to preach a message praising the sanctity of life, the newly democratic government here appears committed to passing one of the world's most liberal abortion laws. Current South African law has effectively restricted legal abortions to about 1,000 women a year.
NEWS
November 12, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
South Africa's Parliament approved the first major post-apartheid law giving thousands of blacks stripped of their land under apartheid three years to reclaim it. The Restitution of Land Rights Bill is the first legislation implementing President Nelson Mandela's pre-election promise to redress the wrongs of nearly 46 years of apartheid. The bill needs only Mandela's signature to put it on the statute books. It provides for a land claims court and a commission on the restitution of land rights.
NEWS
October 31, 1992 | Associated Press
A controversial plan to grant amnesty for political crimes committed under apartheid won approval Friday to become law despite its defeat in Parliament and widespread opposition. The President's Council, a 60-member advisory body dominated by President Frederik W. de Klerk's governing National Party, endorsed the measure, permitting De Klerk to sign it into law.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 14, 1992 | JIM NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A group of top South African legislators out to revamp their country's legal system met with Los Angeles judges and academics Monday, grilling them on everything from constitutional law and the death penalty to televised trials. "We are undergoing a very profound transformation," said Gert B. Myburgh, a member of South Africa's parliament and the chairman of its Joint Committee on Justice in South Africa. "We are interested in learning whatever we can that may assist that process."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 7, 1991 | JANET RAE-DUPREE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Angry that President Bush lifted federal economic sanctions against South Africa last month, city leaders from Los Angeles, Pasadena and West Hollywood joined forces Tuesday to urge local governments to continue their own sanctions against the white-ruled nation until apartheid is abolished. Although South Africa has begun to make progress toward reform, the officials said at a City Hall press conference that Bush's decision to end federal economic sanctions comes at the wrong time.
NEWS
June 10, 1988
President Pieter W. Botha extended South Africa's two-year-old state of emergency for a third year, saying the "ordinary law of the land is still inadequate to protect the lives and possessions of all our citizens" against violence stemming from political unrest. The state of emergency was proclaimed on June 12, 1986, and renewed a year later. The extension was expected.
NEWS
March 2, 1988 | MICHAEL PARKS, Times Staff Writer
The South African government, continuing its crackdown on anti-apartheid groups, proposed new legislation Tuesday that would outlaw foreign funds to finance political activities here. The broadly worded draft legislation could be used to curb the activities of a wide range of anti-apartheid organizations--churches, labor unions and civil rights groups--some of which depend on foreign contributions for as much as 90% of their operating budgets.
NEWS
July 11, 1991 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush's decision to lift U.S. sanctions was heralded Wednesday by government officials and business people across South Africa as the most important step toward international acceptance for Pretoria in more than four decades. The Johannesburg Stock Exchange soared to a new high, the special exchange rate that lures foreign investors to ignore sanctions sank to new lows and business leaders predicted that the beginning of the country's economic recovery is near.
NEWS
June 22, 1991 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Concluding one of the most remarkable sittings in its history, the South African Parliament voted Friday to sharply amend security laws under which tens of thousands of people--including a few of the lawmakers themselves--have been detained without trial. The changes in the Internal Security Act did not go far enough for many mixed-race legislators or anti-apartheid organizations, such as the African National Congress.
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