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South Africa Martial Law

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NEWS
June 5, 1990
South Africa's four-year-old state of emergency expires next Monday, and there is speculation it either will not be renewed or will be extended in sharply curtailed form. Either option would presumably help pave the way for negotiations with the African National Congress. Meanwhile, voters in the coastal town of Umlazi, near Durban, go to the polls to fill a vacant seat in Parliament in what amounts to the first referendum on President Frederik W.
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NEWS
April 1, 1994 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a desperate bid to quell spiraling pre-election violence, the government declared a sweeping state of emergency in Zulu-dominated Natal province Thursday and ordered a significant military force deployed to ensure that balloting is possible in the strife-torn region. It is South Africa's first state of emergency since President Frederik W.
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NEWS
June 11, 1988 | SCOTT KRAFT, Times Staff Writer
The South African government, extending a two-year-old state of emergency Friday, tightened already strict controls on the news media, making it illegal in some cases to quote leading anti-apartheid activists. Under the new guidelines, the news media may not publish the remarks of members of banned or restricted organizations if the government believes such remarks to be a threat to public order.
NEWS
June 5, 1990
South Africa's four-year-old state of emergency expires next Monday, and there is speculation it either will not be renewed or will be extended in sharply curtailed form. Either option would presumably help pave the way for negotiations with the African National Congress. Meanwhile, voters in the coastal town of Umlazi, near Durban, go to the polls to fill a vacant seat in Parliament in what amounts to the first referendum on President Frederik W.
NEWS
February 13, 1987 | MICHAEL PARKS, Times Staff Writer
About 4,000 more people, most of them blacks, have been detained without charge for a month or more under the state of emergency, the South African government reported Thursday. Of these, 281 were children 14 and younger, and three were no more than 11 years old, Parliament was told in Cape Town.
NEWS
April 1, 1994 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a desperate bid to quell spiraling pre-election violence, the government declared a sweeping state of emergency in Zulu-dominated Natal province Thursday and ordered a significant military force deployed to ensure that balloting is possible in the strife-torn region. It is South Africa's first state of emergency since President Frederik W.
NEWS
June 12, 1987 | MICHAEL PARKS, Times Staff Writer
The government reimposed strict censorship on the news media here Thursday, as opposition groups protested President Pieter W. Botha's extension for another year of the national state of emergency. The government, using its emergency powers, issued new regulations to override recent court decisions that had lifted press restrictions and permitted sharper criticism of South Africa's apartheid system of racial separation and minority white rule.
NEWS
July 14, 1988 | SCOTT KRAFT, Times Staff Writer
Zwelakhe Sisulu, a journalist and father of two, stands charged with no crime. Yet he has been in prison for two Christmases, two wedding anniversaries and a dozen family birthdays. He is not allowed letters, but keeps track of 8-year-old Moyikwa's new karate moves and 5-year-old Zoya's first report cards in 30-minute glimpses each Monday through the thick glass of a visitors' cubicle at Diepkloof Prison.
NEWS
February 13, 1990 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nelson R. Mandela, patiently answering questions from reporters under a shade tree, said Monday that he has been "completely overwhelmed by the enthusiasm" of South Africans' welcome after 27 years in prison. "It is something I did not expect," said the 71-year-old leader, sitting with his wife at his side on his first full day of freedom. "I must confess that I am unable to describe my emotions. It was breathtaking, that's all I can say."
NEWS
June 17, 1987 | MICHAEL PARKS, Times Staff Writer
Anti-apartheid groups on Tuesday reaffirmed their determination to continue their struggle against South Africa's white-led minority government despite the extension of the tough state of emergency here. In their first nationwide series of political rallies in a year, the groups marked the June 16 anniversary of the 1976 Soweto student uprising with calls to action that showed their militancy undiminished by the government's yearlong crackdown.
NEWS
February 13, 1990 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nelson R. Mandela, patiently answering questions from reporters under a shade tree, said Monday that he has been "completely overwhelmed by the enthusiasm" of South Africans' welcome after 27 years in prison. "It is something I did not expect," said the 71-year-old leader, sitting with his wife at his side on his first full day of freedom. "I must confess that I am unable to describe my emotions. It was breathtaking, that's all I can say."
NEWS
July 14, 1988 | SCOTT KRAFT, Times Staff Writer
Zwelakhe Sisulu, a journalist and father of two, stands charged with no crime. Yet he has been in prison for two Christmases, two wedding anniversaries and a dozen family birthdays. He is not allowed letters, but keeps track of 8-year-old Moyikwa's new karate moves and 5-year-old Zoya's first report cards in 30-minute glimpses each Monday through the thick glass of a visitors' cubicle at Diepkloof Prison.
NEWS
June 11, 1988 | SCOTT KRAFT, Times Staff Writer
The South African government, extending a two-year-old state of emergency Friday, tightened already strict controls on the news media, making it illegal in some cases to quote leading anti-apartheid activists. Under the new guidelines, the news media may not publish the remarks of members of banned or restricted organizations if the government believes such remarks to be a threat to public order.
NEWS
June 17, 1987 | MICHAEL PARKS, Times Staff Writer
Anti-apartheid groups on Tuesday reaffirmed their determination to continue their struggle against South Africa's white-led minority government despite the extension of the tough state of emergency here. In their first nationwide series of political rallies in a year, the groups marked the June 16 anniversary of the 1976 Soweto student uprising with calls to action that showed their militancy undiminished by the government's yearlong crackdown.
NEWS
June 12, 1987 | MICHAEL PARKS, Times Staff Writer
The government reimposed strict censorship on the news media here Thursday, as opposition groups protested President Pieter W. Botha's extension for another year of the national state of emergency. The government, using its emergency powers, issued new regulations to override recent court decisions that had lifted press restrictions and permitted sharper criticism of South Africa's apartheid system of racial separation and minority white rule.
NEWS
February 13, 1987 | MICHAEL PARKS, Times Staff Writer
About 4,000 more people, most of them blacks, have been detained without charge for a month or more under the state of emergency, the South African government reported Thursday. Of these, 281 were children 14 and younger, and three were no more than 11 years old, Parliament was told in Cape Town.
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