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March 26, 1993 | ROBERT KOEHLER
South African President F. W. de Klerk's revelation Wednesday that South Africa built, then destroyed, nuclear weapons is a stark measure of the changes in the Horn of Africa. The announcement arrives in a political climate where revolution through the ballot box may come in a year's time, and where De Klerk must dramatize a new openness to the Western industrial powers the country is so dependent upon.
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WORLD
April 19, 2009 | Robyn Dixon
Christopher Sadiki is convinced that Jacob Zuma, the president-in-waiting for the ruling African National Congress, is guilty of corruption. But that won't stop the 21-year-old from choosing the ANC when he votes for the first time this week. "Corruption is everywhere," he said, shrugging. "They're all corrupt." And don't ask him about the opposition -- he doesn't want to know. "I don't support them. I don't know anything about them.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 6, 2005 | Rene Lynch
ON and off screen, Mark Bamford and Suzanne Kay find themselves battling stereotypes about South Africa. Their new movie, "Cape of Good Hope," is not at all what might be expected from a film set in a country once bitterly divided by race: The comedy-drama follows the intertwined lives of several characters, including a woman who rescues dogs, a widowed veterinarian and a Muslim couple eager to have children.
NEWS
April 17, 1998 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Almost everyone in the know, including President Nelson Mandela, has dismissed as absurd a recent military intelligence report claiming that a host of disgruntled black leaders was plotting to overthrow Mandela's government. For weeks, all eyes in South Africa have been focused on Gen.
NEWS
February 3, 1990 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A few blocks from where President Frederik W. de Klerk delivered his speech to Parliament on Friday, a young activist, microphone in hand and perspiring in the summer sun, was raising his voice at an anti-apartheid rally with the demand that has been heard for decades at gatherings like this in South Africa. "We demand that De Klerk unban the African National Congress and the South African Communist Party!" the man proclaimed to cheers from the crowd.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 1992 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The contrast and complexity of South Africa firmly hit home for Whoopi Goldberg after one particularly long day in Soweto, the hometown of 2 million blacks where she was shooting scenes for the film "Sarafina!" Goldberg was whisked from the township of chickens and dust and squatter shacks to a $10-million house just 20 minutes away, where she was feted at a reception by African National Congress President Nelson Mandela.
NEWS
December 9, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Zulu leader Mangosuthu Gatsha Buthelezi said Nelson Mandela's African National Congress is seeking monopolistic power as the white National Party is giving it up. "We do not want any future head of state of South Africa to have the kind of power that (Iraq's) Saddam Hussein has over everything that lives and breathes in his land," Buthelezi told the inaugural conference of his Inkatha Freedom Party. Inkatha supporters and pro-ANC Zulus are in a power struggle that has claimed about 4,000 lives.
NEWS
February 26, 1992 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The powerful right-wing Conservative Party, after a prolonged internal debate, formally decided Tuesday to urge white voters to oppose reform of apartheid in the nation's historic March 17 referendum. "I call on all white voters to reject (President Frederik W.) de Klerk's reforms with great enthusiasm in his own referendum," declared Conservative Party leader Andries Treurnicht.
NEWS
August 2, 1993 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the second major massacre in a week, a Zulu army of more than 200 men cut a swath through this township late Saturday and early Sunday, setting fire to passing cars and gunning down residents in their homes. By dawn Sunday, 30 people in an African National Congress stronghold of Tembisa were dead, including 5-month-old Bathando Ngabayena and his parents, who were executed by men in white headbands who burst into their bedroom and opened fire.
NEWS
May 23, 2001 | ANN M. SIMMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Disgraced anti-apartheid activist Allan Boesak, imprisoned last year for fraud and theft, was granted an early release Tuesday, sparking allegations by some prisoners' rights activists of judicial favoritism for the privileged. Boesak was freed from a penitentiary near Cape Town after serving one year of a three-year sentence for stealing $400,000 from charitable donations made to his Foundation for Peace and Justice, including substantial contributions from singer Paul Simon.
NEWS
December 8, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
President Thabo Mbeki lashed out at South Africa's mainly white and mixed-race opposition party bloc after it made big gains in local elections, calling it an "unholy alliance" that is bad for the nation. Mbeki told a victory rally for the ruling African National Congress, or ANC, in Johannesburg that any headway made by the Democratic Alliance could not discredit the will of the overwhelming majority. But analysts said the outcome signaled an alarming rise in racial divisions.
NEWS
June 26, 2000 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The political party that created apartheid, imprisoned Nelson Mandela and later negotiated a peaceful transition to black-majority rule in South Africa has called it quits after 86 years, conceding that it cannot go it alone in the racially mixed nation. Leaders of the New National Party confirmed Sunday that they have agreed to a merger with the country's main opposition party, the Democratic Party, under the name Democratic Alliance.
NEWS
July 3, 1999 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Leaders of the Congress of South African Students, meeting here this week, are pledging to make the Western Cape province "ungovernable." Expect picketing, boycotts, sickouts and strikes in the coming weeks, they warn. Teachers and other trade union groups, who last month led a march on the provincial legislature, are considering further disruptions. Some extremists, according to one report, have even threatened to burn down this city.
NEWS
June 17, 1999 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Thabo Mbeki, a child of the struggle against apartheid who was sent into exile 37 years ago to prepare for black majority rule, became this country's second elected black leader Wednesday, replacing retiring President Nelson Mandela. Mbeki took the oath of office in three languages outside the Union Buildings, the seat of government since 1913 and the center of white minority rule until five years ago.
NEWS
June 16, 1999 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The subject was Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic. There were suggestions he might seek asylum in South Africa. Would he be prevented from entering the country? "No, we will not ban anybody," President Nelson Mandela told reporters here last month. "What we condemn are his actions." Mandela's statement sent journalists scurrying. "Milosevic Is Welcome in South Africa," screamed the headlines. Later, Mandela complained that the media had "gravely distorted" his remarks.
SPORTS
May 6, 1990 | JULIE CART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Flying to South Africa requires patience and perspective. All of Africa seems to be spread out below as the plane zigzags its way to Johannesburg on a curious route. The plane must burrow through endless clouds, for although its presence in African airspace may be tolerated, the plane may not land unless invited. Mt. Kilimanjaro, snow-capped and majestic, juts abruptly from the desert floor, rising like a kingdom in the clouds. Miles later, the outline of Nairobi's airport comes into view.
NEWS
June 8, 1999 | From Associated Press
The African National Congress won solid control of South Africa's Parliament, but final election results Monday showed that it failed to win the power to change the constitution. The ANC came up just one vote short of the two-thirds margin needed to unilaterally amend the constitution. The ANC had denied suggestions by opposition parties that it wanted to do so to amass greater power.
NEWS
June 8, 1999 | From Associated Press
The African National Congress won solid control of South Africa's Parliament, but final election results Monday showed that it failed to win the power to change the constitution. The ANC came up just one vote short of the two-thirds margin needed to unilaterally amend the constitution. The ANC had denied suggestions by opposition parties that it wanted to do so to amass greater power.
NEWS
June 3, 1999 | DEAN E. MURPHY and ANN M. SIMMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In a vote celebrated for its ordinariness, South Africans turned out in large numbers Wednesday in their second national and provincial elections since the end of white minority rule. Definitive results were not expected until today, but independent pollsters have predicted that the ruling African National Congress will win handily.
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