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South Africa Revolts

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NEWS
December 30, 1988 | Associated Press
The law and order minister Thursday banned four anti-apartheid groups, using state-of-emergency regulations that have shut down 28 other organizations in South Africa this year. Two of the latest targets are teachers' unions and a third is a student group that coordinated anti-government protests this year in mixed-race townships near Cape Town.
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NEWS
April 27, 2001 | ANN M. SIMMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Allegations that three senior members of the ruling party were plotting to oust or harm South African President Thabo Mbeki were dismissed Thursday as "paranoia" and "crazy rubbish" by government opponents, analysts and prominent political figures. The accusations made this week by Safety and Security Minister Steve Tshwete, who has launched an investigation into the alleged conspiracy, were aimed at businessmen Cyril Ramaphosa, Tokyo Sexwale and Mathews Phosa.
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NEWS
May 21, 1987 | MICHAEL PARKS, Times Staff Writer
Two car bombs exploded two minutes apart Wednesday outside a courthouse in downtown Johannesburg, killing three white policemen and injuring at least 15 other people. South African authorities blamed the outlawed African National Congress for the bombing, the 26th in the country so far this year and one of the most devastating attacks yet on the police here.
NEWS
December 9, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
At least 37 black South Africans have been killed in ethnic clashes at or near a platinum mine northwest of Johannesburg, police in Cape Town said. A police spokesman said fighting broke out over the weekend at a squatter camp called Freedom Park near the Wildebeestfontein mine in Rustenburg. The clashes, between members of the Sotho and Xhosa ethnic groups, spread to a hostel for migrant workers at the mine, owned by Impala Platinum Holdings.
NEWS
January 30, 1987 | MICHAEL PARKS, Times Staff Writer
One of the Watson brothers, controversial white anti-apartheid activists, was convicted here Thursday of arson and fraud, but two others were acquitted after a trial that the brothers described as a government effort to curb their political activities. Valence M.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 29, 1988 | ANN WIENER, Times Staff Writer
About 300 students chanting anti-apartheid slogans demonstrated in front of the South African Consulate on Monday and called on the government to stop "denying blacks in that country their basic human rights." The Los Angeles Student Coalition, a group with members from more than 30 junior and senior high schools, walked 2 miles from Pan American Park in West Los Angeles to the consulate in Beverly Hills. As they walked, the students, out of school on spring break, chanted "Free South Africa . .
NEWS
March 13, 1994 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hundreds of heavily armed South African army commandos patrolled this riot-torn homeland capital on foot and in huge armored vehicles Saturday, welcomed for the first time as liberators against a repressive regime that had tried to keep blacks from voting in next month's democratic elections. Sent to restore order after a popular uprising here, the army's role is likely to grow following an unprecedented decision in Pretoria to oust Bophuthatswana's despotic leader, Lucas Mangope.
NEWS
April 8, 1989 | SCOTT KRAFT, Times Staff Writer
Black nationalist leader Nelson R. Mandela, in a rare letter from prison to the conservative black leader Mangosuthu Gatsha Buthelezi, has for the first time appealed for peace in a bloody conflict between the two men's supporters that has claimed more than 1,000 lives in Natal province over the past two years.
NEWS
June 4, 1987 | Associated Press
The Rev. Leon H. Sullivan, saying his widely used fair-employment principles have failed to bring an end to South Africa's apartheid, called on nearly 200 American businesses Wednesday to pull out of that nation within nine months. Sullivan, a Philadelphia Baptist minister whose 10-year-old code of conduct has become the standard for U.S. companies in South Africa, also said he wants the U.S. government to enact an economic embargo against South Africa.
NEWS
April 7, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
South African anti-apartheid leader Nelson Mandela, admitting that ANC members are partly responsible for bloody black factional fighting, pleaded with his followers to refrain from violence. Mandela, president of the African National Congress, urged his supporters to show tolerance for their political opponents, such as the Inkatha Freedom Party. The ANC has often blamed the political violence that has killed thousands in recent years on its opponents.
NEWS
June 17, 1996 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It is a sunny Saturday morning in South Africa's best-known black community, and things are hopping at the Dobsonville Mall. Long lines wait at the bank machines. Shoppers clog checkout counters at the supermarket, and families buy popcorn at the triplex cinema. Children with bright balloons celebrate a birthday in the steakhouse. Isabel Mlambo, 17, hangs out near Frankie's Pizza. "I'm meeting my friends," she says, a look of teenage ennui on her face.
NEWS
December 30, 1995 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The killers came 600 to 1,000 strong, marching for miles over steep hills and down lush valleys, beating cowhide shields and waving traditional Zulu spears and knobbed clubs, as well as modern assault rifles and two-way radios.
NEWS
April 16, 1994 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Apostle Mkezi's muscled workers, shirtless and sweating beneath the African sun, dug deeply into the rich black soil of Natal province Friday, preparing two dozen graves for the latest victims of pre-election violence. "The cemetery is almost full," said Mkezi, the caretaker. And, indeed, the green hillside was rippled with fresh graves, humps of earth marked by numbered metal stakes. Nine of the new ones are for a family massacred two weeks ago by Inkatha Freedom Party supporters.
NEWS
April 15, 1994 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A long-shot effort at international mediation to defuse the fierce pre-election conflict in Natal province collapsed in embarrassment and disarray here Thursday before the high-profile mediators had held their first formal meeting. Former Secretary of State Henry A.
NEWS
April 13, 1994 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Already 40 minutes behind schedule, the seven foreign dignitaries, South Africa's foreign minister and hundreds of journalists, diplomats and others had just settled down for opening speeches here when a commotion erupted at one side of the hotel penthouse ballroom. As heads and television cameras turned, Zulu Chief Mangosuthu Gatsha Buthelezi suddenly bounded onto the dais, throwing the news conference into an uproar. The dramatic entrance briefly upstaged former Secretary of State Henry A.
NEWS
March 13, 1994 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hundreds of heavily armed South African army commandos patrolled this riot-torn homeland capital on foot and in huge armored vehicles Saturday, welcomed for the first time as liberators against a repressive regime that had tried to keep blacks from voting in next month's democratic elections. Sent to restore order after a popular uprising here, the army's role is likely to grow following an unprecedented decision in Pretoria to oust Bophuthatswana's despotic leader, Lucas Mangope.
NEWS
May 9, 1993 | From Reuters
President Frederik W. de Klerk told white extremists Saturday that they are playing with fire and echoed a warning by Nelson Mandela's ANC that right-wing mobilization could turn South Africa into a new Bosnia. "Extremists on the left or the right should not underestimate the government's power and its resources," De Klerk said in a statement released in Cape Town.
NEWS
February 3, 1990
PRESIDENT FREDERIK W. DE KLERK, 53, was known as a right-wing conservative until he became president five months ago and began to chip away at apartheid race laws. He is a product of a prominent Afrikaner (Dutch-descended) political dynasty . . . had a meteoric rise as a Cabinet minister . . . became head of state in September after winning a power struggle with outgoing president Pieter W. Botha . . . is lawyer from Transvaal . . .
NEWS
January 17, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Pan-Africanist Congress, a militant black party suspected by police of carrying out several high-profile terrorist attacks on whites in the last year, announced that it is suspending its armed struggle. The decision clears the way for the party to take part in South Africa's first universal suffrage election on April 27, and for its armed wing, the Azanian People's Liberation Army, to join a 10,000-member, multi-party national peacekeeping force scheduled to begin training later this month.
NEWS
October 21, 1993 | Reuters
At least 24 people were killed Wednesday when rival Zulu clans battled with guns, axes and spears in South Africa's Natal province, police said.
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