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South Africa Schools

NEWS
February 16, 1995 | From Associated Press
Armed with clubs and leashed dogs, white protesters tried to stop black students from attending a high school in their neighborhood Wednesday but were pushed back by riot police. It was the first major confrontation over South Africa's new education policy, which allows black students to attend school with white students as well as use any underutilized schools in white areas.
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NEWS
February 17, 1996 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an echo of the United States' civil rights struggle, a South African Supreme Court judge Friday ordered an all-white public school in a conservative rural community to admit black children whom the school had tried to prevent from enrolling.
NEWS
January 10, 1991 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dozens of white public schools opened their doors to all races for the first time Wednesday, cracking an apartheid barrier that has relegated black pupils to separate and unequal township education for more than four decades. One of the first black youngsters to enter an integrated public school was Mpho Mosohle, a nervous 11-year-old dressed in the gray sweater, shorts and knee socks with the school crest of his new school.
NEWS
November 9, 1993 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
School spirit may be the only thing intact at Morris Isaacson High School, a cradle of South Africa's long freedom struggle. The dusty cluster of brick barracks, where black students led the famed 1976 Soweto uprising that launched the battle against apartheid, has few books or chalkboards. Vandals have broken most of the windows, ripped out the light fixtures and punched gaping holes in the walls and ceilings. "Even if we don't have windows and doors, we try," says teacher Thabo Mohlabai.
OPINION
February 9, 1986 | John de St. Jorre, John de St. Jorre is author of "A House Divided: South Africa's Uncertain Future."
President Pieter W. Botha appears to have regained political initiative in South Africa. His speech last week promised specific reforms and set conditions for what now seems to be the imminent release of Nelson Mandela, the jailed black leader. Botha has not, however, charted a clear course for the future nor begun to bridge the chasm that separates white from black in his troubled country. Botha's speech was as conciliatory as his previous major address last August had been belligerent.
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