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South Africa Security

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NEWS
July 17, 1988 | Associated Press
Police on Saturday banned all events marking Nelson Mandela's 70th birthday and set up roadblocks around the Cape Town prison where the black leader is confined. Hundreds of members of South Africa's security forces, many in armored vehicles, patrolled townships outside Cape Town. There were no reports of violence. Police briefly detained at least four runners in a race organized as part of the birthday celebrations.
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NEWS
April 16, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The government threatened a security crackdown and urged swifter progress toward ending apartheid after nationwide violence during memorials for slain black leader Chris Hani. Senior government ministers said multi-party talks on sharing power with the black majority must proceed as quickly as possible. But they said further unrest will not be tolerated.
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NEWS
July 15, 1992 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Frederik W. de Klerk, seeking to restart negotiations with the African National Congress, announced late Tuesday that he will disband three notorious security force units, meeting one of the ANC's 14 conditions for returning to the table. And he went part way toward meeting another ANC demand by promising to ban the carrying of all dangerous weapons in townships declared "unrest areas" and institute new, heavy jail terms for offenders.
NEWS
March 25, 1993 | Times Staff Writer
Amid a resurgence of political violence, including a spate of attacks on whites, President Frederik W. de Klerk announced plans Wednesday to summon army reservists to duty, step up security in "problem areas" and ask Parliament to lift a 3-year-old moratorium on the death penalty. The president said the government is not considering a halt to constitutional negotiations, which are due to resume next week, "but we will insist that these matters be satisfactorily resolved at the outset."
NEWS
November 29, 1989 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Frederik W. de Klerk moved to rein in his national security forces Tuesday by replacing the powerful and secretive National Security Management System with a smaller organization that will be more directly under Cabinet control. The move marked a significant break with the era of former President Pieter W.
NEWS
September 12, 1989
South African police, responding to a wave of international and domestic outrage, banned the use of whips to break up anti-apartheid demonstrations and riots. A police spokesman in Johannesburg, Maj. Marius Bonhuys, said the order applies to plastic quirts and that other crowd-dispersal methods will be continued, including tear gas, birdshot and batons.
NEWS
June 3, 1987
The number of people detained without charge under South Africa's state of emergency is about 1,400, down from 8,500 in January, and only 11 children are still in custody, Justice Minister Hendrik J. Coetsee told Parliament. Adriaan Vlok, the minister of law and order, told a news conference that only 11 children under the age of 16 are in custody, down from a total of 280 in February. There are estimates that up to 30,000 people have been detained since President Pieter W.
NEWS
March 12, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Law and Order Minister Adriaan Vlok declared Soweto, Alexandra and Tembisa "unrest areas" and confined more than 2.5 million blacks to their homes to curb factional fighting that has killed at least 40 people. He also gave security forces wider powers to keep order. The fighting began Saturday in Alexandra. Zulus, tied to the conservative Inkatha Freedom Party, clashed with Xhosas and other blacks loyal to the African National Congress.
NEWS
May 8, 1987 | MICHAEL PARKS, Times Staff Writer
President Pieter W. Botha on Thursday described the victory of his National Party in South Africa's whites-only parliamentary elections this week as an overwhelming mandate to make security the government's primary objective in the wake of nearly three years of civil unrest.
NEWS
May 3, 1991 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Calling political suppression "irrevocably a thing of the past," President Frederik W. de Klerk announced plans Thursday to scrap most of South Africa's notorious Internal Security Act, which gives police broad powers to detain and silence anti-apartheid activists. "The suppression of the right of any party to state its case democratically in an orderly manner is not acceptable to the government," De Klerk told Parliament in Cape Town.
NEWS
July 15, 1992 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Frederik W. de Klerk, seeking to restart negotiations with the African National Congress, announced late Tuesday that he will disband three notorious security force units, meeting one of the ANC's 14 conditions for returning to the table. And he went part way toward meeting another ANC demand by promising to ban the carrying of all dangerous weapons in townships declared "unrest areas" and institute new, heavy jail terms for offenders.
NEWS
June 11, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Amnesty International accused the South African government of continuing to allow security forces to wage war on the African National Congress, even as it negotiates power-sharing with the black movement. A 100-page report by the London-based human rights group said the government has "failed to act against all but a tiny proportion of human rights violators within the police and military." A police spokesman rejected the Amnesty report as biased and incomplete.
NEWS
June 22, 1991 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Concluding one of the most remarkable sittings in its history, the South African Parliament voted Friday to sharply amend security laws under which tens of thousands of people--including a few of the lawmakers themselves--have been detained without trial. The changes in the Internal Security Act did not go far enough for many mixed-race legislators or anti-apartheid organizations, such as the African National Congress.
NEWS
May 3, 1991 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Calling political suppression "irrevocably a thing of the past," President Frederik W. de Klerk announced plans Thursday to scrap most of South Africa's notorious Internal Security Act, which gives police broad powers to detain and silence anti-apartheid activists. "The suppression of the right of any party to state its case democratically in an orderly manner is not acceptable to the government," De Klerk told Parliament in Cape Town.
NEWS
March 12, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Law and Order Minister Adriaan Vlok declared Soweto, Alexandra and Tembisa "unrest areas" and confined more than 2.5 million blacks to their homes to curb factional fighting that has killed at least 40 people. He also gave security forces wider powers to keep order. The fighting began Saturday in Alexandra. Zulus, tied to the conservative Inkatha Freedom Party, clashed with Xhosas and other blacks loyal to the African National Congress.
NEWS
August 26, 1990 | from Reuters
South Africa began calling up army reservists Saturday and sent military reinforcements with armored cars to help police enforce emergency powers in battle-ravaged black townships near Johannesburg. District army chief Gen. Wessel Kritzinger said in a statement: "Additional troops are being deployed to stabilize the violent situation which has arisen over the past few weeks."
NEWS
August 18, 1990 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Only weeks after South Africa lifted the lid on political expression in February, police in this small town arrested Valentine Senkhane during a protest march and tossed him into jail. Senkhane, a black lawyer and local African National Congress leader, was held in solitary confinement for three months. He was denied visits from his lawyer, his family and even his doctor. He had nothing to read and only jailers and police detectives for human contact.
NEWS
September 5, 1987 | MICHAEL PARKS, Times Staff Writer
In the wake of three years of widespread civil unrest, the South African government is putting hundreds of anti-apartheid activists on trial, charging them with treason, subversion, terrorism and other crimes under the security laws. Sixty-nine people are currently facing treason charges in six separate cases.
NEWS
August 18, 1990 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Only weeks after South Africa lifted the lid on political expression in February, police in this small town arrested Valentine Senkhane during a protest march and tossed him into jail. Senkhane, a black lawyer and local African National Congress leader, was held in solitary confinement for three months. He was denied visits from his lawyer, his family and even his doctor. He had nothing to read and only jailers and police detectives for human contact.
NEWS
June 24, 1990 | From United Press International
Two explosions Saturday devastated offices of the ruling National Party a day after death threats against President Frederik W. de Klerk and anti-apartheid leader Nelson Mandela prompted a major tightening of security around national leaders. No one claimed responsibility for the bombs.
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