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South Africa Suits

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BUSINESS
April 21, 2001 | DENISE GELLENE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
By dropping its lawsuit to prevent South Africa from importing cheaper AIDS drugs, the pharmaceutical industry ended a public relations nightmare. And although terms of Thursday's settlement are still being hammered out, experts doubt they will cost drug companies anything of substance. "It is largely symbolic," said Amir Attaran, director of international health research at Harvard University's Center for International Development.
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BUSINESS
April 21, 2001 | DENISE GELLENE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
By dropping its lawsuit to prevent South Africa from importing cheaper AIDS drugs, the pharmaceutical industry ended a public relations nightmare. And although terms of Thursday's settlement are still being hammered out, experts doubt they will cost drug companies anything of substance. "It is largely symbolic," said Amir Attaran, director of international health research at Harvard University's Center for International Development.
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NEWS
April 20, 2001 | ANN M. SIMMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The world's biggest drug companies dropped their controversial lawsuit against the South African government Thursday, paving the way for this country to provide cheaper medication to combat diseases such as AIDS. The Pharmaceutical Manufacturers Assn., on behalf of 39 drug companies, unconditionally withdrew its challenge to legislation--passed in 1997 but not yet implemented--that allows the government to make or buy cheaper drugs.
NEWS
April 20, 2001 | ANN M. SIMMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The world's biggest drug companies dropped their controversial lawsuit against the South African government Thursday, paving the way for this country to provide cheaper medication to combat diseases such as AIDS. The Pharmaceutical Manufacturers Assn., on behalf of 39 drug companies, unconditionally withdrew its challenge to legislation--passed in 1997 but not yet implemented--that allows the government to make or buy cheaper drugs.
NEWS
April 13, 1995 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a setback for the South African government, Winnie Mandela unexpectedly won her job back Wednesday as a deputy Cabinet minister after filing a lawsuit against her estranged husband, President Nelson Mandela. The reinstatement of the scandal-plagued Mrs. Mandela--at least for now--clearly was a major embarrassment for the year-old democratic government, which had cited her sacking on March 27 as evidence of its attempts to crack down on graft in government and lawlessness in society.
NEWS
November 21, 1993 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It all began with twin tragedies. A horrible traffic accident had left 25-year-old Denise Darvall brain-dead, though her heart was beating. Louis Washkansky, suffering from heart disease, was hours, perhaps minutes, from death. On that day 26 years ago, a gutsy South African surgeon transplanted Darvall's heart into Washkansky's body. Washkansky lived only 18 days, but the feat made Dr. Christiaan Barnard, at age 45, an instant worldwide celebrity.
NEWS
April 13, 1995 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a setback for the South African government, Winnie Mandela unexpectedly won her job back Wednesday as a deputy Cabinet minister after filing a lawsuit against her estranged husband, President Nelson Mandela. The reinstatement of the scandal-plagued Mrs. Mandela--at least for now--clearly was a major embarrassment for the year-old democratic government, which had cited her sacking on March 27 as evidence of its attempts to crack down on graft in government and lawlessness in society.
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