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South Africa Territories And Possessions

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NEWS
September 18, 1992 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Andrew Manson, a white South African, and his mixed-race Danish wife moved here a decade ago, they found an oasis of racial tolerance and tranquillity. While apartheid gripped South Africa a few miles away, this tiny nation--created by apartheid's social engineers--had a black ruler, multiracial schools, mixed neighborhoods and equal opportunities for all races. But, oh, how the tables have turned.
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NEWS
January 31, 1994 | From Associated Press
The African National Congress offered Sunday to let pro-apartheid whites vote for their own homeland--but said a black government would retain power to veto the results. ANC President Nelson Mandela appealed to militant whites to accept the offer and avert bloodshed. But the right-wing Afrikaner Volksfront angrily rejected the proposal and vowed to establish its own homeland by force if necessary to avoid living under black rule.
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NEWS
April 10, 1988
Anglican Archbishop Desmond M. Tutu and eight fellow bishops led a defiant church service in Oshakati, Namibia, and called for that country's independence from South Africa. The main preacher, Bishop Bruce Evans, described South Africa's occupation of the territory as evil, urged Christians to oppose it and called for the immediate withdrawal of troops from Namibia, also known as South-West Africa.
NEWS
September 18, 1992 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Andrew Manson, a white South African, and his mixed-race Danish wife moved here a decade ago, they found an oasis of racial tolerance and tranquillity. While apartheid gripped South Africa a few miles away, this tiny nation--created by apartheid's social engineers--had a black ruler, multiracial schools, mixed neighborhoods and equal opportunities for all races. But, oh, how the tables have turned.
NEWS
May 5, 1988 | TYLER MARSHALL, Times Staff Writer
Declaring that "progress was made," four nations involved in talks to end the 13-year-old Angolan civil war agreed Wednesday to meet again in Africa within the next few weeks. "The principle involved in an Angola-Namibia settlement does exist," said U.S. Assistant Secretary of State Chester A. Crocker, who headed the negotiations, the first of their kind in one of the world's longest regional conflicts. "It's ready to be pursued."
NEWS
February 17, 1989
The U.N. Security Council gave unanimous approval to an independence plan designed to free Namibia from 74 years of South African rule, and it dispatched the first U.N. peacekeepers to the region. "The decision . . . marks the last major step toward decolonization," said Ambassador Jal Pratap Rana of Nepal, Security Council president for February. "We look forward to welcoming Namibia as a fellow member of this family of nations before long."
NEWS
March 2, 1989 | From Associated Press
The General Assembly on Wednesday approved $416 million for the U.N. peacekeeping mission to help free Namibia from 74 years of South African rule. On April 1, the United Nations is to begin implementing a one-year plan to create the world's newest independent nation, thus settling the last major colonial problem in Africa. South Africa has run Namibia, or South-West Africa, since World War I, when it captured the former German colony.
NEWS
December 31, 1987 | Associated Press
The military in the nominally independent South African black homeland of Transkei staged a bloodless coup Wednesday, ousting Prime Minister Stella Sigcau after less than three months in office. Maj. Gen. Bantu Holomisa, the 32-year-old army commander, announced on Radio Transkei that he has taken power as head of a military council. He accused Sigcau of corruption and said she is now "on leave."
NEWS
April 30, 1988 | From Times Wire Services
An unprecedented meeting among top officials from the United States, Angola, Cuba and South Africa will be held in London next week to discuss a settlement of the 13-year-old civil war in Angola and independence for Namibia, the State Department said Friday.
NEWS
September 9, 1992 | From Associated Press
The ruler of Ciskei, Brig. Gen. Oupa Gqozo, accepts that his small patch on the southeast coast will rejoin South Africa, but he wants to retain some power. Gqozo (pronounced COR-sa) is one of several leaders of South Africa's black homelands who have increasingly aligned themselves with the white government as insurance for when apartheid ends. The future of the 10 homelands has become a major issue in South Africa's deadlocked talks on a new constitution.
NEWS
March 31, 1990 | From Reuters
Prospects for a speedy end to South Africa's "Zulu wars" dimmed Friday after nationalist leader Nelson R. Mandela called off a peace parley with his Zulu rival, Mangosuthu Gatsha Buthelezi. The two black leaders had been scheduled to share a platform next week to try to stop the battles raging in Natal province between allies of Mandela's African National Congress (ANC) and Buthelezi's Zulu-based Inkatha movement.
NEWS
March 30, 1990 | From Reuters
This country's most powerful black leaders, Nelson R. Mandela and Mangosuthu Gatsha Buthelezi, agreed Thursday to meet to try to stop factional fighting that has claimed up to 30 lives in a few days. The meeting, scheduled for Monday, is aimed at ending chronic fighting in Natal province between groups linked to Mandela's African National Congress (ANC) and Buthelezi's Zulu-based Inkatha movement.
NEWS
March 29, 1990 | From Associated Press
Rival Zulu factions battled with guns, clubs and knives Wednesday in Natal province, setting scores of homes on fire and forcing hundreds of villagers to flee into the countryside. Soldiers and police patrolled Natal in an effort to quell the violence, which broke out Tuesday and has killed at least two people. Local reporters said that up to 14 people have been killed. "The whole so-called 'Valley of Death' is covered with blue smoke.
NEWS
March 21, 1990 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Sam Nujoma took the oath as president of this newborn nation today, it marked the end of a personal battle for liberation that began almost exactly 30 years ago when the rebel leader slipped out of the territory to launch a bush war against South African colonialists. Nujoma, a stocky man of 60 years with a thick white beard, has been called uneducated and ruthless by his opponents and a kindly man of the people by his supporters.
NEWS
March 21, 1990 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
South African President Frederik W. de Klerk, ending 75 years of often bloody colonial rule over this desert territory, ordered the lowering of his nation's flag early today, and the new blue, red and green colors of Namibia were run up the flagpole, establishing the world's newest nation. "The independence of Namibia marks the beginning of a new era for the whole of southern Africa," De Klerk declared before South African soldiers lowered the flag.
NEWS
March 18, 1990 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nelson R. Mandela, facing pressure to end the growing black unrest in South Africa's townships, returned home Saturday after a three-week foreign journey and promised that his organization would devise a strategy to deal with the problem and "go into action" soon.
NEWS
March 13, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Factional fighting and confrontations between activists and authorities killed 20 blacks and wounded six police officers over the weekend, authorities said. This included 13 people killed in unrest in KwaZulu, homeland of Zulu leader Mangosuthu Gatsha Buthelezi, whose supporters have been involved in some of the worst fighting. Buthelezi's Inkatha movement opposes apartheid but is more conservative than the African National Congress.
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