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South Africa Trade

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BUSINESS
July 11, 1991 | SCOT J. PALTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Big U.S. companies made clear Wednesday that they won't be stampeding back into South Africa, despite President Bush's decision to lift economic sanctions. Only a few companies contacted Wednesday--among them, Irvine-based Fluor Corp.--said they were taking exploratory steps toward eventually returning. Such multinational giants as Mobil, Exxon, General Motors and Xerox said they had no such intentions.
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BUSINESS
February 29, 1996
Caribbean Trade Group Eyes S. Africa Links: The 14-member Caribbean Community has agreed to send a ministerial trade delegation to South Africa, as a first step to opening up trade links with that country. The regional grouping of former British and Dutch colonies invited South African President Nelson Mandela to attend its next full summit, set for July in Barbados.
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NEWS
June 19, 1986 | BOB SECTER, Times Staff Writer
In a dramatic move that stunned and perplexed even members of the Democratic majority, the House on Wednesday voted to virtually sever trade ties with South Africa and to order American companies and individuals to rid themselves of all assets now held in the racially torn country. Sponsors of the legislation, which passed on a voice vote, acknowledged that it has no chance of surviving intact in the Republican-led Senate.
BUSINESS
September 14, 1995 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Nelson Mandela sounded grateful, to say the least, when he delivered a brief speech of welcome at a conference for potential foreign investors in a hotel ballroom here this week. Mandela repeatedly and effusively thanked the 200 or so business leaders, bankers and financial analysts "from the bottom of our hearts" for attending the session.
NEWS
September 25, 1990 | DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush pledged support for an early end to U.S. sanctions against South Africa as he met for more than two hours Monday with South African President Frederik W. de Klerk. "The process of change in South Africa is irreversible," Bush said, voicing a controversial position that differs from that of most other Western leaders and puts the Administration at odds with Nelson Mandela, deputy president of the African National Congress.
BUSINESS
August 30, 1993 | PETER ALAN HARPER, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Some companies are slipping in quietly, some more brazenly. Others are trying to learn the rules of engagement in post-apartheid South Africa, where a foreign business rush seems just around the corner. With trade shows and conferences scheduled during the next few months, it's clear that a broad U.S. business interest is growing toward South Africa, where the systematic repression of the black majority is crumbling. A key deterrent for now is that 165 U.S.
BUSINESS
March 13, 1988 | MICHAEL PARKS, Times Staff Writer
Businessmen, economists and government officials here contend that the economic sanctions imposed on South Africa by the United States and Western Europe during the past three years have proved so ineffective that the country need not fear further such measures. "There is no way that anyone can exert further financial pressure on South Africa," Fred du Plessis, chairman of the giant Sanlam insurance, financial and industrial conglomerate, declared.
BUSINESS
February 29, 1996
Caribbean Trade Group Eyes S. Africa Links: The 14-member Caribbean Community has agreed to send a ministerial trade delegation to South Africa, as a first step to opening up trade links with that country. The regional grouping of former British and Dutch colonies invited South African President Nelson Mandela to attend its next full summit, set for July in Barbados.
NEWS
December 4, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
African National Congress President Nelson Mandela, despite an upbeat assessment of South Africa's course, urged the United Nations to keep oil and arms embargoes in place until a democratic, non-racial government finally rules in his country.
NEWS
June 25, 1988 | Associated Press
U.S. trade sanctions imposed against South Africa two years ago cut that nation's exports by about $417 million, a loss Pretoria was unable to recover by directing trade to other countries, a Senate panel was told Friday.
BUSINESS
August 30, 1993 | PETER ALAN HARPER, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Some companies are slipping in quietly, some more brazenly. Others are trying to learn the rules of engagement in post-apartheid South Africa, where a foreign business rush seems just around the corner. With trade shows and conferences scheduled during the next few months, it's clear that a broad U.S. business interest is growing toward South Africa, where the systematic repression of the black majority is crumbling. A key deterrent for now is that 165 U.S.
NEWS
December 4, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
African National Congress President Nelson Mandela, despite an upbeat assessment of South Africa's course, urged the United Nations to keep oil and arms embargoes in place until a democratic, non-racial government finally rules in his country.
BUSINESS
July 11, 1991 | SCOT J. PALTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Big U.S. companies made clear Wednesday that they won't be stampeding back into South Africa, despite President Bush's decision to lift economic sanctions. Only a few companies contacted Wednesday--among them, Irvine-based Fluor Corp.--said they were taking exploratory steps toward eventually returning. Such multinational giants as Mobil, Exxon, General Motors and Xerox said they had no such intentions.
BUSINESS
January 8, 1991 | From Associated Press
A declining world economy and the Persian Gulf crisis combined to give the diamond market a dull finish for 1990, figures released Monday by the De Beers diamond cartel showed. Sales of rough, uncut diamonds rose 2% to $4.17 billion last year, from $4.09 billion in 1989, De Beers' marketing arm, the Central Selling Organization, said. It termed 1990 "a year of consolidation" and said the sales were satisfactory.
NEWS
September 25, 1990 | DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush pledged support for an early end to U.S. sanctions against South Africa as he met for more than two hours Monday with South African President Frederik W. de Klerk. "The process of change in South Africa is irreversible," Bush said, voicing a controversial position that differs from that of most other Western leaders and puts the Administration at odds with Nelson Mandela, deputy president of the African National Congress.
NEWS
February 17, 1990 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The African National Congress announced Friday that it will soon send a delegation for groundbreaking talks with South African President Frederik W. de Klerk on removal of obstacles to black-white negotiations. The ANC's surprise decision, a major step toward ending 30 years of armed resistance to white minority-led rule in South Africa, clears the way for the first meeting between guerrilla leaders and a South African head of state.
NEWS
February 17, 1990 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The African National Congress announced Friday that it will soon send a delegation for groundbreaking talks with South African President Frederik W. de Klerk on removal of obstacles to black-white negotiations. The ANC's surprise decision, a major step toward ending 30 years of armed resistance to white minority-led rule in South Africa, clears the way for the first meeting between guerrilla leaders and a South African head of state.
NEWS
April 3, 1987 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, Times Staff Writer
Israeli arms merchants, almost certainly with the approval of their government, regularly violated the U.N. embargo on arms sales to South Africa for almost a decade before the government called a halt to the traffic last month, the State Department reported Thursday.
NEWS
November 16, 1989 | J. MICHAEL KENNEDY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To some, the case of the South African steel seems to defy logic. At the Houston Ship Channel, a $91-million bridge--the largest ever financed by the state--is being built with steel girders produced in South Africa. Never mind that there has been a ban on the importation of South African steel since the United States imposed economic sanctions to protest apartheid in 1986. The bridge project is perfectly legal--at least in the eyes of the Bush Administration.
NEWS
June 25, 1988 | Associated Press
U.S. trade sanctions imposed against South Africa two years ago cut that nation's exports by about $417 million, a loss Pretoria was unable to recover by directing trade to other countries, a Senate panel was told Friday.
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