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South Africa Travel Restrictions

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NEWS
October 21, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Leaders of the 50-nation Commonwealth promised to promote democracy and just government in a declaration relaunching the largely Third World organization. The declaration did not threaten sanctions against authoritarian governments within the Commonwealth. The leaders of Britain and its former colonies agreed to the declaration at a retreat in Victoria Falls, midway through a weeklong biennial summit. The leaders also agreed to end travel and other restrictions against South Africa.
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NEWS
October 21, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Leaders of the 50-nation Commonwealth promised to promote democracy and just government in a declaration relaunching the largely Third World organization. The declaration did not threaten sanctions against authoritarian governments within the Commonwealth. The leaders of Britain and its former colonies agreed to the declaration at a retreat in Victoria Falls, midway through a weeklong biennial summit. The leaders also agreed to end travel and other restrictions against South Africa.
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SPORTS
May 8, 1990 | JULIE CART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
South Africa is accustomed to inconvenience. Decades of isolation in sports and business have made resourcefulness a necessity. In sports, the boycotts and bans have also engendered a sophisticated level of cheating among some sportsmen, those who have learned to use subterfuge to get what the world would deny them. They use bribery and corruption. They buy passports, change names and blur identities. It is no great surprise that money greases the wheels of this international intrigue.
SPORTS
May 8, 1990 | JULIE CART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
South Africa is accustomed to inconvenience. Decades of isolation in sports and business have made resourcefulness a necessity. In sports, the boycotts and bans have also engendered a sophisticated level of cheating among some sportsmen, those who have learned to use subterfuge to get what the world would deny them. They use bribery and corruption. They buy passports, change names and blur identities. It is no great surprise that money greases the wheels of this international intrigue.
SPORTS
May 8, 1990 | JULIE CART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the few cases of South Africa's sports defections on record, such as Zola Budd gaining British citizenship in time for the 1984 Olympics, South Africans have reacted with mixed emotions. The knowledgeable sporting public views such an athlete as merely taking one of the few roads open to international competition. To others, leaving South Africa is the ultimate betrayal.
SPORTS
May 8, 1990 | JULIE CART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the few cases of South Africa's sports defections on record, such as Zola Budd gaining British citizenship in time for the 1984 Olympics, South Africans have reacted with mixed emotions. The knowledgeable sporting public views such an athlete as merely taking one of the few roads open to international competition. To others, leaving South Africa is the ultimate betrayal.
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