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South Africa Treaties

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September 15, 1991 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After a week of renewed township bloodshed, President Frederik W. de Klerk, Nelson Mandela and Mangosuthu Gatsha Buthelezi signed a peace treaty Saturday, promising to work together to end the violence that has claimed 3,000 black lives in the past year. The National Peace Accord, co-signed by 23 South African leaders, marked the first time that the country's top political figures had met and agreed on any issue.
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NEWS
September 15, 1991 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After a week of renewed township bloodshed, President Frederik W. de Klerk, Nelson Mandela and Mangosuthu Gatsha Buthelezi signed a peace treaty Saturday, promising to work together to end the violence that has claimed 3,000 black lives in the past year. The National Peace Accord, co-signed by 23 South African leaders, marked the first time that the country's top political figures had met and agreed on any issue.
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NEWS
June 28, 1991 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The South African government, saying it is seeking to take its "rightful place in the world community," announced plans Thursday to sign the international nuclear non-proliferation treaty, ending years of suspicion about its weapons capability. The pledge to open its nuclear facilities to inspection and not to divert nuclear material for weapons "will allay any fears South Africa will ever use such devices," Foreign Minister Roelof F. (Pik) Botha told a news conference in Pretoria.
NEWS
June 28, 1991 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The South African government, saying it is seeking to take its "rightful place in the world community," announced plans Thursday to sign the international nuclear non-proliferation treaty, ending years of suspicion about its weapons capability. The pledge to open its nuclear facilities to inspection and not to divert nuclear material for weapons "will allay any fears South Africa will ever use such devices," Foreign Minister Roelof F. (Pik) Botha told a news conference in Pretoria.
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