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South African Broadcasting Corp

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ENTERTAINMENT
June 3, 1993 | SHAUNA SNOW, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Violence Halts TV Screening: The 1964 Michael Caine film "Zulu," depicting a famous British imperial battle against a Zulu army, was withdrawn from South African television over the weekend because it was considered too violent. Critics said the film, which was approved by both British and South African TV censors in the 1960s, was censored because of the political ramifications of depicting black-on-white violence. But a spokeswoman for the state-run South African Broadcasting Corp.
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NEWS
November 20, 1998 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If your image of Africa, gleaned from CNN, is one of pain and suffering and senseless death, the South African Broadcasting Corp. hopes to brighten the picture. If it makes some money doing so, that would be nice too. Beginning this week, the state-owned television network is broadcasting a 24-hour news channel devoted to Africa that pledges to fill the "cosmic black hole" in Western coverage of the world's poorest continent.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 18, 1988 | Deborah Caulfield, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
A South African release for Sir Richard Attenborough's anti-apartheid film, "Cry Freedom," looks increasingly doubtful. A TV report aired Friday on the government-run South African Broadcasting Corp. quoted a Justice Ministry spokesman as saying the film can't be shown in the country without the approval of Justice Minister Kobie Coetsee.
NEWS
July 31, 1996 | CLAUDIA PUIG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In newspapers all around Britain, sportswriters are sounding a recurring complaint about NBC's coverage of the Atlanta Games. They describe it as highly partisan, even jingoistic, and charge that most of the non-American participants are ignored. But those who switch on the British Broadcasting Corp.'s Olympic coverage find programming that is almost totally focused--with equal patriotic fervor--on British participants in the Games. Before an event, commentators pump up the British contestant.
NEWS
July 31, 1996 | CLAUDIA PUIG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In newspapers all around Britain, sportswriters are sounding a recurring complaint about NBC's coverage of the Atlanta Games. They describe it as highly partisan, even jingoistic, and charge that most of the non-American participants are ignored. But those who switch on the British Broadcasting Corp.'s Olympic coverage find programming that is almost totally focused--with equal patriotic fervor--on British participants in the Games. Before an event, commentators pump up the British contestant.
NEWS
November 20, 1998 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If your image of Africa, gleaned from CNN, is one of pain and suffering and senseless death, the South African Broadcasting Corp. hopes to brighten the picture. If it makes some money doing so, that would be nice too. Beginning this week, the state-owned television network is broadcasting a 24-hour news channel devoted to Africa that pledges to fill the "cosmic black hole" in Western coverage of the world's poorest continent.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 1989 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
A song by award-winning black American singer Tracy Chapman praising jailed black leader Nelson Mandela has been banned from South African state radio and television. The South African Broadcasting Corp. said Tuesday that "Freedom Now" and another song, "Material World," were "undesirable for broadcasting." It did not elaborate. The songs may still be played by independent stations.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 1, 1987 | Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
The biggest stage hit in South Africa this year, playing to full houses at one of Cape Town's top theaters, is a musical commemorating a mixed-race neighborhood demolished to make room for whites. Four songs from "District Six--The Musical" are banned from the airwaves of the government-controlled South African Broadcasting Corp. But the show has won nightly standing ovations from multiracial audiences at the 650-seat Baxter Theater.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 3, 1988 | STEVE WEINSTEIN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
A right-wing South African politician charged Bill Cosby, his ever-popular family sitcom and state-run television with bringing the message of the banned African National Congress into South African homes. Conservative Party member Chris Jacobs lambasted the South African Broadcasting Corp.
NEWS
December 20, 1985
South African troops ventured into Angola for the third time since a formal withdrawal in April, killing at least six black guerrillas and capturing weapons, South Africa's television reported. The South African Broadcasting Corp. based its report on information from "diplomatic sources in Africa." South African officials declined to comment on the report.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 3, 1993 | SHAUNA SNOW, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Violence Halts TV Screening: The 1964 Michael Caine film "Zulu," depicting a famous British imperial battle against a Zulu army, was withdrawn from South African television over the weekend because it was considered too violent. Critics said the film, which was approved by both British and South African TV censors in the 1960s, was censored because of the political ramifications of depicting black-on-white violence. But a spokeswoman for the state-run South African Broadcasting Corp.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 18, 1988 | Deborah Caulfield, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
A South African release for Sir Richard Attenborough's anti-apartheid film, "Cry Freedom," looks increasingly doubtful. A TV report aired Friday on the government-run South African Broadcasting Corp. quoted a Justice Ministry spokesman as saying the film can't be shown in the country without the approval of Justice Minister Kobie Coetsee.
NEWS
January 14, 1991 | From Times Wire Services
Soccer officials today unofficially blamed inadequate stadium security for the violence and stampede by thousands of fans that left 42 people dead and more than 50 injured in South Africa's worst sporting disaster. Two people who were seriously injured died today, raising the death toll in Sunday's tragedy to 42, the South African Broadcasting Corp. reported.
NEWS
March 1, 1988 | From Times Wire Services
A passenger plane exploded in air and crashed 20 yards from a Coca-Cola factory building near Johannesburg today, killing all 17 people aboard, the South African Broadcasting Corp. reported. "There are bodies lying all over. . . . It was a horrible sight," said transport worker Frank Aurell, one of the first on the scene. "It exploded in mid-air. It was already in two pieces as it came down."
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