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South African Consulate

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 10, 1986
Instead of being chastised by your editorial (Jan. 30), "Indignation Takes a Wrong Turn," the Beverly Hills City Council should be applauded for adopting its Jan. 21 resolution "That a letter be sent to the State Department opposing the location of the South African Consulate in the City of Beverly Hills." The City Council had previously, on Dec. 3, 1985, adopted a resolution "condemn(ing) the apartheid policies of the government of South Africa as unconscionable, abhorrent and inhuman," and urging that government "to abandon its policies of apartheid and to accord all citizens under its jurisdiction equal rights, privileges and protections."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 19, 2000 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
From any other 82-year-old, the advice offered Saturday to two dozen young people might have caused an outbreak of yawning and eye-rolling. But when former South African President Nelson Mandela urged a group of Los Angeles-area youth leaders to take education seriously, his audience listened.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 21, 1989
Two articles caught my eye on Jan. 15. One was "Security Guards Seal Off Anti-Apartheid Students" (Metro). "Thirty high school and junior high school students spent the second day of a sit-in Saturday at the South African Consulate in Beverly Hills protesting anti-apartheid policies." One student stated, "All of us feel strongly that what's going on in South Africa is unacceptable by any human standards." Another article on the front page, "Jim Crow's Ghost Lurks in New South," stated Atlanta is split almost in half racially.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 9, 1994
When I was 11, I remember standing on a beach in Cape Town, South Africa, with my toes in the white sand, a bucket of starfish and shells in one hand, looking out across the ice-cold caps of the Atlantic Ocean at a place that my father, who held my other hand, pointed to. "See that island out there," he said, looking out at a vague piece of land on the horizon, "that's Robben Island, where Nelson Mandela is. He's a black political prisoner and will...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 12, 1989 | CHARISSE JONES, Times Staff Writer
A planned weeklong sit-in at the South African Consulate in Beverly Hills was cut short Tuesday when a federal official placed 25 of the student protesters under citizen's arrest for obstructing access to the facility. Twenty-four juveniles and one adult member of the Los Angeles Student Coalition were arrested shortly after noon by a member of the U.S. State Department, said Beverly Hills Police Lt. Robert P. Curtis. The protesters, who began their sit-in Monday morning, were booked at the police station for investigation of misdemeanor charges of obstructing a person's access to a public place, Curtis said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 18, 1990
As a member of the Los Angeles Student Coalition, I completely agree with Byron Dillon's sentiments that the dire problems of our own country, such as drugs, AIDS, racism and homelessness, must be dealt with immediately. But his criticism of our organization is unfair for precisely the reasons he cites (letter, Jan. 2). It is very true that compared to a sit-in at the South African Consulate, working for the homeless is unglamorous and yields little publicity. This is exactly why people such as Dillon have never heard about our efforts to help Los Angeles' homeless, such as our clothing drive to raise emergency supplies for the men and women of Skid Row who lost what little they had when the homeless arts and cultural center Another Planet burned down last summer.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 1, 1985 | PENELOPE McMILLAN, Times Staff Writer
It's very exciting to be a South African diplomat. --Los Angeles Consul General Les Labuschagne At the front desk of the South African Consulate in Beverly Hills, security guard Mark Lattin sat behind the thick glass shield that separates him from the public. The reception area on the other side of the shield, where anti-apartheid demonstrators occasionally line up and pretend to request visa applications, contained no furniture. The doors leading from it to consular offices were locked.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 4, 1991 | JOHN H. LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Five teen-age filmmakers flew to South Africa on Wednesday to spend a month in a southern township producing a film that will capture their experiences as they, in turn, produce a series of documentaries on youth and apartheid.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 11, 1989 | CHARISSE JONES, Times Staff Writer
They started off the morning singing the unofficial anthem of black Africa, but by noon had switched to tunes by the Sex Pistols. One student was willing to get arrested--if she could be sprung from jail in time for swim practice. And others were resigned to interrupting their civil disobedience to complete homework assignments. So it went Monday at the South African Consulate in Beverly Hills, where more than 40 junior high, senior high and college students staged a sit-in to protest that country's policy of apartheid.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 9, 1994
When I was 11, I remember standing on a beach in Cape Town, South Africa, with my toes in the white sand, a bucket of starfish and shells in one hand, looking out across the ice-cold caps of the Atlantic Ocean at a place that my father, who held my other hand, pointed to. "See that island out there," he said, looking out at a vague piece of land on the horizon, "that's Robben Island, where Nelson Mandela is. He's a black political prisoner and will...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 4, 1991 | JOHN H. LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Five teen-age filmmakers flew to South Africa on Wednesday to spend a month in a southern township producing a film that will capture their experiences as they, in turn, produce a series of documentaries on youth and apartheid.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 18, 1990
As a member of the Los Angeles Student Coalition, I completely agree with Byron Dillon's sentiments that the dire problems of our own country, such as drugs, AIDS, racism and homelessness, must be dealt with immediately. But his criticism of our organization is unfair for precisely the reasons he cites (letter, Jan. 2). It is very true that compared to a sit-in at the South African Consulate, working for the homeless is unglamorous and yields little publicity. This is exactly why people such as Dillon have never heard about our efforts to help Los Angeles' homeless, such as our clothing drive to raise emergency supplies for the men and women of Skid Row who lost what little they had when the homeless arts and cultural center Another Planet burned down last summer.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 12, 1989 | CHARISSE JONES, Times Staff Writer
A planned weeklong sit-in at the South African Consulate in Beverly Hills was cut short Tuesday when a federal official placed 25 of the student protesters under citizen's arrest for obstructing access to the facility. Twenty-four juveniles and one adult member of the Los Angeles Student Coalition were arrested shortly after noon by a member of the U.S. State Department, said Beverly Hills Police Lt. Robert P. Curtis. The protesters, who began their sit-in Monday morning, were booked at the police station for investigation of misdemeanor charges of obstructing a person's access to a public place, Curtis said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 11, 1989 | CHARISSE JONES, Times Staff Writer
They started off the morning singing the unofficial anthem of black Africa, but by noon had switched to tunes by the Sex Pistols. One student was willing to get arrested--if she could be sprung from jail in time for swim practice. And others were resigned to interrupting their civil disobedience to complete homework assignments. So it went Monday at the South African Consulate in Beverly Hills, where more than 40 junior high, senior high and college students staged a sit-in to protest that country's policy of apartheid.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 21, 1989
Two articles caught my eye on Jan. 15. One was "Security Guards Seal Off Anti-Apartheid Students" (Metro). "Thirty high school and junior high school students spent the second day of a sit-in Saturday at the South African Consulate in Beverly Hills protesting anti-apartheid policies." One student stated, "All of us feel strongly that what's going on in South Africa is unacceptable by any human standards." Another article on the front page, "Jim Crow's Ghost Lurks in New South," stated Atlanta is split almost in half racially.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 10, 1986
Instead of being chastised by your editorial (Jan. 30), "Indignation Takes a Wrong Turn," the Beverly Hills City Council should be applauded for adopting its Jan. 21 resolution "That a letter be sent to the State Department opposing the location of the South African Consulate in the City of Beverly Hills." The City Council had previously, on Dec. 3, 1985, adopted a resolution "condemn(ing) the apartheid policies of the government of South Africa as unconscionable, abhorrent and inhuman," and urging that government "to abandon its policies of apartheid and to accord all citizens under its jurisdiction equal rights, privileges and protections."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 5, 1985 | ROXANE ARNOLD, Times Staff Writer
After a brief exchange with the South African consul general, a group of black community figures on Friday ended their 24-hour anti-apartheid sit-in at the South African Consulate in Beverly Hills, vowing, "We will be back." Singing "We Shall Overcome" and other anthems associated with the civil rights movement, the protesters, including Assemblywoman Maxine Waters (D-Los Angeles) and Bishop H. H.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 19, 2000 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
From any other 82-year-old, the advice offered Saturday to two dozen young people might have caused an outbreak of yawning and eye-rolling. But when former South African President Nelson Mandela urged a group of Los Angeles-area youth leaders to take education seriously, his audience listened.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 1, 1985 | PENELOPE McMILLAN, Times Staff Writer
It's very exciting to be a South African diplomat. --Los Angeles Consul General Les Labuschagne At the front desk of the South African Consulate in Beverly Hills, security guard Mark Lattin sat behind the thick glass shield that separates him from the public. The reception area on the other side of the shield, where anti-apartheid demonstrators occasionally line up and pretend to request visa applications, contained no furniture. The doors leading from it to consular offices were locked.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 5, 1985 | ROXANE ARNOLD, Times Staff Writer
After a brief exchange with the South African consul general, a group of black community figures on Friday ended their 24-hour anti-apartheid sit-in at the South African Consulate in Beverly Hills, vowing, "We will be back." Singing "We Shall Overcome" and other anthems associated with the civil rights movement, the protesters, including Assemblywoman Maxine Waters (D-Los Angeles) and Bishop H. H.
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