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South African Traditions

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WORLD
June 28, 2009 | robyn dixon
As South Africa gears up to host next year's soccer World Cup, there are plenty of doomsayers predicting the worst. If transportation shortages don't ruin the event, crime will. The beer will run out. Or the stadiums will be half empty. But no one expected an ugly plastic trumpet to dominate the controversy.
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WORLD
June 28, 2009 | robyn dixon
As South Africa gears up to host next year's soccer World Cup, there are plenty of doomsayers predicting the worst. If transportation shortages don't ruin the event, crime will. The beer will run out. Or the stadiums will be half empty. But no one expected an ugly plastic trumpet to dominate the controversy.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 29, 1992 | DON SNOWDEN
for one, he stands closer to six feet, six inches than the nearly 7-feet stature advertised. But in his Los Angeles debut before a sparse crowd at the Music Machine on Saturday, the lanky wordsmith's pair of hourlong sets conveyed a defiant political stance that went beyond mere entertainment yet worked perfectly well on that level. Mbuli is often likened to Britain's Linton Kwesi Johnson for setting his poems to music.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 24, 1993 | YVONNE SAMUEL, RELIGIOUS NEWS SERVICE
They sang when they were snatched from their African native land and transported to distant shores; they sang when the scorching sun beat down on their backs in the cotton fields of their white masters, and they sang during the civil rights era as they marched for freedom and justice. Traditionally, African-Americans have used sacred music to help ease the pain and agony of oppression. The melodies were sung with the belief that God would deliver them from their oppressors.
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