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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 27, 1994 | MILES CORWIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For Samuel Paul--who was jailed six times, interrogated repeatedly and beaten by police in his native South Africa--voting for the first time was a bittersweet experience. He had fought for all South Africans, regardless of color, to have the right to vote. And now that day was here. But as he waited in line in front of the South African Consulate in Beverly Hills to cast his absentee ballot in the country's first all-race election, he felt lonely rather than jubilant.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 27, 1994 | MILES CORWIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For Samuel Paul--who was jailed six times, interrogated repeatedly and beaten by police in his native South Africa--voting for the first time was a bittersweet experience. He had fought for all South Africans, regardless of color, to have the right to vote. And now that day was here. But as he waited in line in front of the South African Consulate in Beverly Hills to cast his absentee ballot in the country's first all-race election, he felt lonely rather than jubilant.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 29, 1990 | PATT MORRISON and ANDREA FORD, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Down to the moment of Nelson Mandela's arrival here, the city of Los Angeles will be laboring to purge from its ledgers any connection to the apartheid state of South Africa. And yet often in the bouquets the city presents to some visiting dignitary--perhaps even to Mandela himself--is a bird of paradise blossom. It is the official city flower--and a native of South Africa.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 14, 1992 | ANDREA FORD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was not without a sense of irony that Anthony Gordon stood in line earlier this week at the South African consulate to cast his vote in favor of President Frederik W. de Klerk's policy of dismantling apartheid. After all, it was the bitter politics of racial divisiveness that drove him from his homeland years ago.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 14, 1992 | ANDREA FORD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was not without a sense of irony that Anthony Gordon stood in line earlier this week at the South African consulate to cast his vote in favor of President Frederik W. de Klerk's policy of dismantling apartheid. After all, it was the bitter politics of racial divisiveness that drove him from his homeland years ago.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 17, 1994 | JILL BETTNER and LUCILLE RENWICK, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Ronald Kunene of Encino will make history April 26. So will his roommate, Sydney Skosana, their friend, Lebo Morake, and Lauretta Ngakane, who works in Burbank. All four are black South Africans. Born in a country that excluded them, and forced into exile to pursue an education and their professions, they will vote for the first time 10 days from now in South Africa's historic all-race election.
NEWS
March 24, 1985 | KATHLEEN HENDRIX, Times Staff Writer
South Africans in Los Angeles are here in all their racial, ethnic and political diversity, and they have brought the complexities of their society with them. Here is a representative look at who they are . For Pamela Wade there is danger in the temptation to go back to South Africa. Recently her husband, Richard, received an offer to teach at the University of Natal and the temptation was put to the test. They did not return.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 29, 1990 | PATT MORRISON and ANDREA FORD, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Down to the moment of Nelson Mandela's arrival here, the city of Los Angeles will be laboring to purge from its ledgers any connection to the apartheid state of South Africa. And yet often in the bouquets the city presents to some visiting dignitary--perhaps even to Mandela himself--is a bird of paradise blossom. It is the official city flower--and a native of South Africa.
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