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NEWS
August 31, 1989 | DOUGLAS JEHL, Times Staff Writer
In an ambitious plan to swap "debt for drugs," a key Senate Democrat proposed Wednesday that the United States offer substantial debt relief to Peru, Colombia and Bolivia in return for commitments that the savings would be used to reduce cocaine production.
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NEWS
June 29, 1998 | CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Every other day, farmer Javier Restrepo loads 800 boxes of fresh asparagus on a cargo flight bound for Miami. From there it is warehoused, marketed and distributed by California-based Couture Farms and then sold to consumers around the United States. Restrepo keeps the California operator supplied year-round with a vegetable that was once absent from U.S. supermarkets for months at a time. Never mind that most Colombians have never tasted asparagus.
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BUSINESS
October 8, 1989 | WILLIAM R. LONG, Times Staff Writer
As Western Europe moves toward economic unity in 1992, Latin American countries are taking new aim at the "integration" of their economies to speed development and compete in international markets. "We are working intensely at that task, and may God will that in the year 2000 we Latin Americans find ourselves totally integrated," President Carlos Saul Menem of Argentina said recently.
NEWS
February 20, 1990 | MICHAEL ISIKOFF, THE WASHINGTON POST
After years of despair over South America's burgeoning coca crop, the Bush Administration is studying a new option in the Latin drug war: unleashing swarms of tiny insects into the jungles of Peru and Bolivia to devour the shrubs that are the raw material for cocaine. At the urging of national drug control director William J. Bennett, the Administration recently more than quadrupled, to $6.
NEWS
February 20, 1990 | MICHAEL ISIKOFF, THE WASHINGTON POST
After years of despair over South America's burgeoning coca crop, the Bush Administration is studying a new option in the Latin drug war: unleashing swarms of tiny insects into the jungles of Peru and Bolivia to devour the shrubs that are the raw material for cocaine. At the urging of national drug control director William J. Bennett, the Administration recently more than quadrupled, to $6.
NEWS
June 29, 1998 | CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Every other day, farmer Javier Restrepo loads 800 boxes of fresh asparagus on a cargo flight bound for Miami. From there it is warehoused, marketed and distributed by California-based Couture Farms and then sold to consumers around the United States. Restrepo keeps the California operator supplied year-round with a vegetable that was once absent from U.S. supermarkets for months at a time. Never mind that most Colombians have never tasted asparagus.
NEWS
December 5, 1990 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush on Tuesday relaxed his insistence on deep cuts in agricultural subsidies, an issue that has stalled international trade talks under way in Brussels. The United States previously has insisted on cuts of 90% in export subsidies and 75% in other farm supports. But Bush, visiting South America, was asked Tuesday whether he would settle for something less. "We are not locked on a specific figure," he said. "We are locked on the fact that there has to be inclusion of all categories."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 10, 1989 | ANDREW LePAGE, Times Staff Writer
Though Africanized "killer" bees aren't expected to reach San Diego County for several years, county and state agriculture officials are taking no chances. The county agricultural commissioner's office has set a bee trap near each of the county's three border crossings--San Ysidro, Otay Mesa and Tecate--in the hope that none of the Africanized bees enter the county from Central or South America without agriculture and health officials knowing about it. State agriculture officials have set three traps of their own in the county, including one at San Diego Bay, where they fear the bees are most likely to appear.
BUSINESS
October 8, 1989 | WILLIAM R. LONG, Times Staff Writer
As Western Europe moves toward economic unity in 1992, Latin American countries are taking new aim at the "integration" of their economies to speed development and compete in international markets. "We are working intensely at that task, and may God will that in the year 2000 we Latin Americans find ourselves totally integrated," President Carlos Saul Menem of Argentina said recently.
NEWS
August 31, 1989 | DOUGLAS JEHL, Times Staff Writer
In an ambitious plan to swap "debt for drugs," a key Senate Democrat proposed Wednesday that the United States offer substantial debt relief to Peru, Colombia and Bolivia in return for commitments that the savings would be used to reduce cocaine production.
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