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South America Economy

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NEWS
December 3, 1990 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush embarked Sunday night on a weeklong visit to South America, seeking to promote the economic restructuring now under way throughout the continent by building support for his free-trade proposals.
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BUSINESS
November 7, 1998 | JAMES F. SMITH and CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Key Latin American markets stormed back and ended the week at three-month highs as investor confidence grew that the region is managing to fend off the global financial crisis that ravaged Asia and Russia earlier this year. Analysts were far from willing to pronounce the end of the threat to Latin America, but they welcomed the growing stability in the region, which is good news for the United States as well.
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BUSINESS
November 7, 1998 | JAMES F. SMITH and CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Key Latin American markets stormed back and ended the week at three-month highs as investor confidence grew that the region is managing to fend off the global financial crisis that ravaged Asia and Russia earlier this year. Analysts were far from willing to pronounce the end of the threat to Latin America, but they welcomed the growing stability in the region, which is good news for the United States as well.
NEWS
September 15, 1998 | CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
World economic leaders are nearing a consensus that Latin America, especially Brazil, must be saved from an Asian-style economic collapse. That consensus crystallized Monday as the world community, led by President Clinton, made the survival of emerging markets a priority. The major industrialized nations seem ready to draw a line in the sand with Brazil out of fear that the collapse of Latin America's largest economy would be an enormous setback in the global shift toward free-market economies.
BUSINESS
October 8, 1989 | WILLIAM R. LONG, Times Staff Writer
As Western Europe moves toward economic unity in 1992, Latin American countries are taking new aim at the "integration" of their economies to speed development and compete in international markets. "We are working intensely at that task, and may God will that in the year 2000 we Latin Americans find ourselves totally integrated," President Carlos Saul Menem of Argentina said recently.
NEWS
September 15, 1998 | CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
World economic leaders are nearing a consensus that Latin America, especially Brazil, must be saved from an Asian-style economic collapse. That consensus crystallized Monday as the world community, led by President Clinton, made the survival of emerging markets a priority. The major industrialized nations seem ready to draw a line in the sand with Brazil out of fear that the collapse of Latin America's largest economy would be an enormous setback in the global shift toward free-market economies.
NEWS
January 1, 1994 | WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
What once seemed like ivory tower daydreaming is now reality in the making: Huge trade blocs are forming up and down the Americas to let goods and services pass freely across international borders. Not only is there a NAFTA--the North American Free Trade Agreement, stretching from the Yukon to the Yucatan. There is also a SAFTA--a South American free-trade area that extends from Amazonia to Patagonia.
NEWS
June 23, 1992
The presidents of Argentina, Brazil, Paraguay and Uruguay meet Friday and Saturday at this ski resort in the Argentine Andes to update their plans for a regional common market. The Southern Cone Common Market (MERCOSUR), with a combined population of nearly 200 million, is scheduled to be in full operation by January, 1995.
BUSINESS
June 27, 1990 | PETER D. MOORE, PETER D. MOORE is a managing partner of Inferential Focus, a market-intelligence firm based in New York
Since 1985, the New York Times/CBS News Poll has asked: "What do you think is the most important problem facing this country today?" At the end of 1987, a mere 2% responded "drugs." By July, 1989, that figure had risen to 22%. In September, 1989, launched by President Bush's declaration of a "war on drugs," the public's concern soared to 64%. In only two years, drugs had moved from the periphery of U.S. consciousness to become the omnipresent corrupter of youth.
BUSINESS
November 12, 1998 | Associated Press
With exorbitantly high interest rates strangling South America's largest economy, Brazil's central bank heeded the president's call to lower the country's key lending rate. The central bank's Monetary Policy Committee lowered the rate from 49.75% to 42.25%. Most analysts had expected such a relatively modest reduction, rather than a sharp drop. The central bank decision followed a tumultuous day on the Sao Paulo stock exchange.
NEWS
January 1, 1994 | WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
What once seemed like ivory tower daydreaming is now reality in the making: Huge trade blocs are forming up and down the Americas to let goods and services pass freely across international borders. Not only is there a NAFTA--the North American Free Trade Agreement, stretching from the Yukon to the Yucatan. There is also a SAFTA--a South American free-trade area that extends from Amazonia to Patagonia.
NEWS
June 23, 1992
The presidents of Argentina, Brazil, Paraguay and Uruguay meet Friday and Saturday at this ski resort in the Argentine Andes to update their plans for a regional common market. The Southern Cone Common Market (MERCOSUR), with a combined population of nearly 200 million, is scheduled to be in full operation by January, 1995.
NEWS
December 3, 1990 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush embarked Sunday night on a weeklong visit to South America, seeking to promote the economic restructuring now under way throughout the continent by building support for his free-trade proposals.
BUSINESS
June 27, 1990 | PETER D. MOORE, PETER D. MOORE is a managing partner of Inferential Focus, a market-intelligence firm based in New York
Since 1985, the New York Times/CBS News Poll has asked: "What do you think is the most important problem facing this country today?" At the end of 1987, a mere 2% responded "drugs." By July, 1989, that figure had risen to 22%. In September, 1989, launched by President Bush's declaration of a "war on drugs," the public's concern soared to 64%. In only two years, drugs had moved from the periphery of U.S. consciousness to become the omnipresent corrupter of youth.
BUSINESS
October 8, 1989 | WILLIAM R. LONG, Times Staff Writer
As Western Europe moves toward economic unity in 1992, Latin American countries are taking new aim at the "integration" of their economies to speed development and compete in international markets. "We are working intensely at that task, and may God will that in the year 2000 we Latin Americans find ourselves totally integrated," President Carlos Saul Menem of Argentina said recently.
BUSINESS
January 6, 1999 | Reuters
Nearly 3,000 former Ford Motor Co. workers, who lost their jobs just before Christmas, occupied an assembly plant near Sao Paulo, Brazil, in a bid to force the company to take at least some of them back. There were no reports of violence as the company, the No. 2 U.S. auto maker, made no attempt to stop the sacked workers from entering the plant. But the plant was shut down early on its first official working day of 1999.
NEWS
May 25, 2008 | Marco Sibaja, The Associated Press
A South American union was born Friday as leaders of the region's 12 nations set out to create a continental parliament. Some see the Union of South American Nations, or Unasur, as a regional version of the European Union. Summit host Brazil wants Unasur to help coordinate defense affairs across South America, and Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez calls it a counterweight to the United States. Chavez said the U.S. is "trying to generate wars in South America" to "divide and conquer."
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