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April 21, 1991 | WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Cholera finds most of its victims among the impoverished masses, but sometimes it is more selective. Congressman Hernan Lazo, 44, said he caught the dreaded disease in the dining room of the Chamber of Deputies, Peru's lower house of Congress. He ate pig's feet with peanut sauce and a fruit salad there on April 1. "I had lunch at 1:30 and at 4 I was sick," Lazo recalled. "I was in a cold sweat, pallid." By 10:30 that evening, he looked so bad that friends took him to the hospital.
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NEWS
February 15, 1992 | WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Now in its second year, the South American cholera epidemic has spread recently to Argentina, and many of the continent's countries are resigning themselves to a long struggle against the potentially fatal disease. Cholera has long been endemic in parts of Asia and Africa, but it had not struck in South America since early this century.
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NEWS
September 27, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The same cholera bacteria that has killed thousands in South America apparently has infested Alabama's oyster reefs, Mobile County's health officer said. The reefs will be closed indefinitely because of the preliminary finding by Food and Drug Administration inspectors. Bacteria aren't uncommon in oysters, but doctors have been alarmed about the cholera found at Buoy Reef near Dauphin Island because it appears to be the deadly strain that is sweeping South America.
NEWS
September 27, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The same cholera bacteria that has killed thousands in South America apparently has infested Alabama's oyster reefs, Mobile County's health officer said. The reefs will be closed indefinitely because of the preliminary finding by Food and Drug Administration inspectors. Bacteria aren't uncommon in oysters, but doctors have been alarmed about the cholera found at Buoy Reef near Dauphin Island because it appears to be the deadly strain that is sweeping South America.
NEWS
February 15, 1992 | WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Now in its second year, the South American cholera epidemic has spread recently to Argentina, and many of the continent's countries are resigning themselves to a long struggle against the potentially fatal disease. Cholera has long been endemic in parts of Asia and Africa, but it had not struck in South America since early this century.
NEWS
August 24, 1990 | United Press International
Health officials predicted Thursday that polio will be wiped out in the Western Hemisphere this year, 35 years after the famous Salk vaccine began a dramatic battle against the crippling disease. The incidence of the potentially deadly viral disease has steadily declined in South America and North America since the polio vaccine was introduced in the 1950s, the federal Centers for Disease Control reported. In 1990, only four new cases have been discovered in the hemisphere, said Dr.
NEWS
April 28, 1991 | Associated Press
A Florida woman who recently visited South America was confirmed to have cholera and health officials suspected a second case in the state. Cholera has reached epidemic proportions in South America, killing more than 1,000 people in Peru and spreading into Colombia, Ecuador, Chile and Brazil. The woman, who had visited Ecuador, was treated in a hospital and is recovering at home.
NEWS
July 28, 1990 | ROBERT STEINBROOK, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Buoyed by substantial progress in recent months, Pan American Health Organization officials remain cautiously optimistic that they can achieve their goal of eradicating polio from the Western Hemisphere by the end of this year. So far this year, only three cases of the feared crippler of children have been confirmed--one in Mexico, one in Ecuador and one in Peru. Another 10 cases are classified as "polio compatible," which means there is not enough evidence to definitely exclude the diagnosis.
NEWS
April 24, 1991 | DANIEL P. PUZO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The largest food-borne cholera outbreak to appear in this country since the beginning of a massive epidemic in South America was confirmed by New Jersey state health officials Tuesday. Eight people, from the cities of Jersey City and West New York, became ill earlier this month after consuming illegally imported crab meat from Ecuador. Four were later diagnosed as suffering from cholera, a potentially fatal disease whose symptoms include severe diarrhea and vomiting leading to dehydration.
NEWS
September 25, 1989
About 1 billion people--one out of every five persons on Earth--are suffering from disease, poor health or malnourishment, the World Health Organization reported. However, there has been enough health-care improvement, including the eradication of smallpox, in the last 40 years to raise human life expectancy from 41 years to 59.7 in the developing countries, the U.N. agency said. Dr.
NEWS
April 28, 1991 | Associated Press
A Florida woman who recently visited South America was confirmed to have cholera and health officials suspected a second case in the state. Cholera has reached epidemic proportions in South America, killing more than 1,000 people in Peru and spreading into Colombia, Ecuador, Chile and Brazil. The woman, who had visited Ecuador, was treated in a hospital and is recovering at home.
NEWS
April 24, 1991 | DANIEL P. PUZO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The largest food-borne cholera outbreak to appear in this country since the beginning of a massive epidemic in South America was confirmed by New Jersey state health officials Tuesday. Eight people, from the cities of Jersey City and West New York, became ill earlier this month after consuming illegally imported crab meat from Ecuador. Four were later diagnosed as suffering from cholera, a potentially fatal disease whose symptoms include severe diarrhea and vomiting leading to dehydration.
NEWS
April 21, 1991 | WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Cholera finds most of its victims among the impoverished masses, but sometimes it is more selective. Congressman Hernan Lazo, 44, said he caught the dreaded disease in the dining room of the Chamber of Deputies, Peru's lower house of Congress. He ate pig's feet with peanut sauce and a fruit salad there on April 1. "I had lunch at 1:30 and at 4 I was sick," Lazo recalled. "I was in a cold sweat, pallid." By 10:30 that evening, he looked so bad that friends took him to the hospital.
NEWS
August 24, 1990 | United Press International
Health officials predicted Thursday that polio will be wiped out in the Western Hemisphere this year, 35 years after the famous Salk vaccine began a dramatic battle against the crippling disease. The incidence of the potentially deadly viral disease has steadily declined in South America and North America since the polio vaccine was introduced in the 1950s, the federal Centers for Disease Control reported. In 1990, only four new cases have been discovered in the hemisphere, said Dr.
NEWS
July 28, 1990 | ROBERT STEINBROOK, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Buoyed by substantial progress in recent months, Pan American Health Organization officials remain cautiously optimistic that they can achieve their goal of eradicating polio from the Western Hemisphere by the end of this year. So far this year, only three cases of the feared crippler of children have been confirmed--one in Mexico, one in Ecuador and one in Peru. Another 10 cases are classified as "polio compatible," which means there is not enough evidence to definitely exclude the diagnosis.
NEWS
September 28, 2008 | Tini Tran, Associated Press
They were Premier Zhou Enlai's favorite late-night snack. He loved White Rabbit candy so much he gave a bag to U.S. President Richard Nixon during his historic visit to China. But the brand, beloved by generations of Chinese, took a hit after it was linked to the tainted milk scandal. The Shanghai-based maker of the candy said Friday that it had halted production because of suspected melamine contamination. The chewy vanilla-flavored White Rabbit sweets have been pulled from store shelves around Asia and in Britain.
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