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ENTERTAINMENT
October 26, 1991 | From Religious News Service
During Pope John Paul II's recent 12-day trip to Brazil, he proclaimed two themes that are standard fare for his approach to the Third World: a stirring message that combines hope for the poor with straightforward criticism of civil authorities--and a warning to priests against deep political involvement. The Pope's repetition of familiar themes in Brazil is tied to the country's importance to the church.
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NEWS
May 25, 1990 | JAMES F. SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If there were a candidate's handbook on electioneering in Latin America, it would need to include this new rule: Assure the voters that you are particularly well qualified because you lack experience in politics. In a growing number of countries, and especially those with grave economic and social problems, newcomers and outsiders alike are dishing out embarrassing defeats to traditional politicians and old-line parties.
NEWS
May 25, 1990 | JAMES F. SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If there were a candidate's handbook on electioneering in Latin America, it would need to include this new rule: Assure the voters that you are particularly well qualified because you lack experience in politics. In a growing number of countries, and especially those with grave economic and social problems, newcomers and outsiders alike are dishing out embarrassing defeats to traditional politicians and old-line parties.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 26, 1991 | From Religious News Service
During Pope John Paul II's recent 12-day trip to Brazil, he proclaimed two themes that are standard fare for his approach to the Third World: a stirring message that combines hope for the poor with straightforward criticism of civil authorities--and a warning to priests against deep political involvement. The Pope's repetition of familiar themes in Brazil is tied to the country's importance to the church.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 25, 1997
Cuba's Fidel Castro, not known as a humanitarian, made an obvious but important observation at last year's World Food Summit. If the world produces more than enough food to feed all of its people, he asked, why should even one person starve? Yet children the world over, Cuba included, face a food crisis, according to a UNICEF report released earlier this month.
WORLD
November 26, 2002 | T. Christian Miller and Hector Tobar, Times Staff Writers
Across Latin America, people are trading in the old for the new. In country after country, voters are rejecting political parties and powerful party bosses who have long dominated the economic and social landscape in favor of outsiders. It's a trend rooted less in ideology than in a desire for change. Voters do not seem to care whether candidates are of the left or right, but whether they are likely to deliver a better standard of living.
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