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South Asia Politics

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May 28, 1991 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Funerals, it is said, are reunions, tragic yet social affairs that bring together a wide assortment of friends, family, and colleagues whose worlds seem to intersect only at the point of one individual's death. So it was last Friday at the cremation site called Shanti Sthal on the banks of New Delhi's Yamuna River, where thousands of presidents, politicians and public worshipers from throughout the world came together to witness the spiritual departure of slain Indian leader Rajiv Gandhi.
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NEWS
May 28, 1991 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Funerals, it is said, are reunions, tragic yet social affairs that bring together a wide assortment of friends, family, and colleagues whose worlds seem to intersect only at the point of one individual's death. So it was last Friday at the cremation site called Shanti Sthal on the banks of New Delhi's Yamuna River, where thousands of presidents, politicians and public worshipers from throughout the world came together to witness the spiritual departure of slain Indian leader Rajiv Gandhi.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 7, 2000 | MANSOOR IJAZ, Mansoor Ijaz, a member of the Council on Foreign Relations, is currently in South Asia for consultations with Kashmiri political leaders and the Indian government
Pakistan's decision last weekend to join a cease-fire declared by India a few days earlier along Kashmir's disputed line of control represents a watershed development in South Asia's politics of war. Pakistani leader Gen. Pervez Musharraf clearly understood the gravity of India's unilateral decision. Not since the days of the British raj has New Delhi resorted to nonviolence as a weapon of conflict resolution.
OPINION
February 5, 1995 | Paula R. Newberg, Paula R. Newberg is a senior associate at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace.
Diplomatic old-speak met foreign policy new-speak in South Asia last month, revealing a hole at the heart of U.S. policy toward the region. Defense Secretary William J. Perry and Commerce Secretary Ronald H. Brown, both recently returned from India and Pakistan, sought to replace the old security-based U.S. diplomacy with commerce-based engagement.
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