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South Asia Security

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NEWS
November 6, 1987 | RONE TEMPEST, Times Staff Writer
The leaders of seven South Asian countries have pledged to take joint action against ethnic terrorist groups. The move came Wednesday at a summit meeting of the South Asian Assn. for Regional Cooperation, which was organized three years ago. The members are India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, Bhutan, Maldives and Nepal. Afghanistan has applied to join the group, and India supports the application, arguing that Afghanistan is already a member of the United Nations and the Nonaligned Movement.
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NEWS
November 6, 1987 | RONE TEMPEST, Times Staff Writer
The leaders of seven South Asian countries have pledged to take joint action against ethnic terrorist groups. The move came Wednesday at a summit meeting of the South Asian Assn. for Regional Cooperation, which was organized three years ago. The members are India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, Bhutan, Maldives and Nepal. Afghanistan has applied to join the group, and India supports the application, arguing that Afghanistan is already a member of the United Nations and the Nonaligned Movement.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 12, 1998 | AHMAD KAMAL, Ahmad Kamal is Pakistan's permanent representative to the United Nations. He served as Pakistan's chief disarmament negotiator in Geneva from 1989 to 1995
The three nuclear tests conducted by India in the Pokharan desert Monday confirm the world's worst fears of nuclear irresponsibility in New Delhi's Hindu fundamentalist rulers. India's duplicitous claims of a peaceful nuclear program have been replaced by an open admission of a nuclear weapons program.
OPINION
October 7, 2001 | PAULA R. NEWBERG, Paula R. Newberg has written extensively about politics in South and Central Asia
If there is a place condemned to repeat history, it may well be Pakistan. This year, Pakistanis have good reason to approach the second anniversary of Gen. Pervez Musharraf's coup with apprehension. As a U.S.-led coalition prepares to strike at global terrorism and sets its sights on the Taliban, it should read recent Pakistani history with care and ensure that sorting out Afghanistan does not again leave Pakistanis out in the cold.
WORLD
July 20, 2009 | Josh Meyer
The U.S. government is deploying dozens of Drug Enforcement Administration agents to Afghanistan in a new kind of "surge," targeting trafficking networks that officials say are increasingly fueling the Taliban insurgency and corrupting the Afghan government. The move to dramatically expand a second front is seen as the latest acknowledgment in Washington that security in Afghanistan cannot be won with military force alone.
NEWS
May 17, 1998 | TYLER MARSHALL and DEXTER FILKINS and ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
After failing to win international backing for tough punitive measures against New Delhi in the wake of India's nuclear tests last week, the United States on Saturday dangled the prospect of significant rewards for Pakistan if it refrains from testing atomic weapons of its own.
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