Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSouth Asians
IN THE NEWS

South Asians

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
April 21, 1993 | SOMINI SENGUPTA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rakesh Ratti wanted to publish the book that might have freed him from an anguished youth in a rural Northern California town. The youngest of seven children of farmers from North India, the 34-year-old writer grew up in Yuba City, puzzled at how he could be both Indian and gay, feeling lonely and misunderstood.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 28, 2014 | By Robert Faturechi
A Los Angeles County sheriff's candidate who is currently one of the department's highest-ranking officials was chastised for using a mock ethnic accent during a joke phone call played at a retirement party, internal sheriff's records show. In the 2010 incident, a recording of which was obtained by The Times, Assistant Sheriff James Hellmold calls a station watch commander, and appears to imitate a vaguely South Asian accent. He criticizes the watch commander while mispronouncing words in a sing-songy rambling rant, according to the recording.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 12, 2007 | Shazia Haq, Special to The Times
Priya Sachdeva drove to Fremont in Northern California recently to swab the inside of her cheek with a Q-tip to try to help someone she didn't know. Sachdeva, a UC Irvine student of South Asian descent, responded to the call to help a stranger as part of what the National Marrow Donor Program has called a "supercharged" donor campaign: a massive online effort on behalf of Vinay Chakravarthy, a 28-year-old Fremont native suffering from leukemia.
WORLD
June 4, 2011 | By Patrick J. McDonnell, Los Angeles Times
At least 200 migrants, mostly sub-Saharan Africans and South Asians, were missing and feared drowned after an overcrowded boat that left Libya bound for Italy capsized in the Mediterranean, the United Nations refugee agency said Friday. The doomed craft ran aground Wednesday on a sandbank near a chain of Tunisian islands, about 185 miles northwest of Tripoli. It capsized as desperate passengers rushed to one side seeking rescue by approaching Tunisian coast guard and fishing boats, the U.N. said.
BUSINESS
July 3, 2000 | DAVID KESMODEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Sandeep Walia and his partners presented their sweeping plan for an Internet start-up to investor Navneet Chugh last year, Chugh was underwhelmed, to put it kindly. "Navneet said, 'Shut up, guys. You can't do all that,' " said the 26-year-old Walia, an electronics engineer whose idea for a worldwide e-tailer of ethnic handicrafts occurred to him at a party. A swift wake-up call was not all that the fledgling company, BuyBuzz Inc.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 15, 1991 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The sixth annual Los Angeles Asian Pacific American International Film Festival continues at UCLA's Dickson Art Center Auditorium on Thursday at 7:30 p.m. and at Melnitz Theater on Saturday and Sunday at 5 p.m. Among the 16 films and videos to be presented are three excellent half-hour documentaries on what it is like to be an Asian in America and Britain. All of their makers have hit upon simple yet original and revealing ways to explore this question of cultural identity.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 25, 2009 | Anna Gorman
As a child in Pakistan, Hamid Khan recalls playing cricket in the dusty courtyard outside his home while his mother drank chai and discussed politics with neighbors. He often listened as they criticized their country's leadership and lamented the massive displacement after the partition from India. By the time he was a teenager, he was politically active himself, regularly participating in anti-government demonstrations. Khan's passion for politics has continued here in the U.S.
NEWS
June 6, 2001 | From Associated Press
Hundreds of young people of Asian descent clashed with police Tuesday night in the northern English city of Leeds as racial tensions boiled over for the second time in two weeks, police and news reports said. About 300 youths in a predominantly Bangladeshi neighborhood hurled bricks at police and set a car and storefront on fire. Residents said the outburst of anger followed the Sunday arrest of a local man.
NATIONAL
January 9, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
VIRGINIA The South Asian earthquake that spawned deadly tsunamis also shifted water levels by at least 3 feet in a geologically sensitive Virginia well about 9,600 miles from the epicenter, researchers say. The well near Christiansburg, which started oscillating about an hour after the magnitude 9 quake near Sumatra on Dec. 26, is particularly sensitive to movements in the Earth and is monitored by the U.S. Geological Survey. The fluctuations lasted about five hours.
WORLD
August 4, 2002 | From Associated Press
Ten more people have drowned in Bangladesh, raising the death toll from South Asian monsoon rains to 560, relief officials said Saturday. The monsoon floods in the last month have destroyed crops and farms and killed hundreds throughout India, Nepal and Bangladesh. The death toll has been highest in Nepal, where rains and mudslides have killed an estimated 269 people, according to Nepal's Interior Ministry.
WORLD
December 31, 2010 | By John M. Glionna and Ethan Kim, Los Angeles Times
The curtain that shrouds North Korean culture and daily life opened briefly this week with reports that state television in Pyongyang had broadcast the British soccer film "Bend It Like Beckham. " In one of the world's most reclusive nations, Western movies and TV fare are largely verboten, especially a film that deals with such racy subject matters as intercultural relationships, homosexuality and religion. But censors took care of that: The 2002 movie starring Parminder Nagra and Keira Knightley as young soccer players and Jonathan Rhys Meyers as their coach was edited down to one hour, leaving little more than scenes of a sport that is beloved to most North Koreans.
FOOD
April 15, 2010 | By Miles Clements, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Brami's Kosher Pizza in Reseda bakes the impossible. Somehow stuffed inside a thin disc of malawach — a Yemeni flatbread as dense and flaky as a hundred layers of phyllo — is a pizza. Mozzarella oozes with each bite from between the crisp sheets of dough, bringing with it tangy crumbles of feta, diced tomatoes and briny green olives. At its edge, the crust is pinched into an almost pastry-like braid, sealed just well enough to contain that cheesy filling.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 14, 2010 | By Anna Gorman
Artesia's Pioneer Boulevard bustles with sari stores, jewelry boutiques and Indian restaurants that cater to the thousands of South Asian immigrants who have settled into the neighborhood. Though many of those immigrants are seniors, few have ever ventured to the nearby Artesia Senior Center, popular among native-born residents and earlier generations of Portuguese and Dutch immigrants. Language barriers and vegetarian diets have kept some Indian seniors away, while others simply didn't know about the center and the meals and activities offered there.
WORLD
September 15, 2009 | Mark Magnier
It's 8 o'clock on a Sunday night in the Pakistani capital, but collection cowboy Sharoon Hermoon is living on U.S. time. Headset in place, feet on his desk, he aims his speed dialer at a debtor in Fort Worth, Texas. "Hello, ma'am, how ya doin' today?" he says in a convincing American accent. "My name is James Harold and you owe us $11,000." There's a deer-in-the-headlights moment at the other end, then a deep breath, then a torrent of excuses. "I don't know what you're talking about," she says.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 25, 2009 | Anna Gorman
As a child in Pakistan, Hamid Khan recalls playing cricket in the dusty courtyard outside his home while his mother drank chai and discussed politics with neighbors. He often listened as they criticized their country's leadership and lamented the massive displacement after the partition from India. By the time he was a teenager, he was politically active himself, regularly participating in anti-government demonstrations. Khan's passion for politics has continued here in the U.S.
NEWS
April 5, 2009 | Brian Murphy, Murphy writes for the Associated Press.
Be warned: Spitting here could get you deported. We're not talking just any kind of spit. In this case, it's the red-tinted juice of a popular Asian leaf that's causing the fuss as Dubai tries to buff the image of its less-posh districts. The crackdown -- announced last month amid a broader effort to stem behavior deemed offensive -- has stirred an unusual Arab-Asian culture clash in a city where the friction is often between Western ways grating against conservative Gulf sensibilities.
WORLD
January 3, 2004
The impoverished nations of South Asia agreed on the framework for a free trade zone that would encompass one-fifth of the world's population. The broad framework of the accord was decided in Islamabad, Pakistan, by foreign ministers preparing for a summit of India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, Nepal, the Maldives and Bhutan. The pact would allow the free flow of goods and establish a regional development bank, Indian External Affairs Minister Yashwant Sinha said.
NEWS
April 29, 1990 | Reuters
Japanese Prime Minister Toshiki Kaifu left Saturday for a South Asian tour during which he is expected to announce increased economic aid to the region. After an overnight stop in Bangkok, Thailand, Kaifu is to fly to New Delhi, first leg of a tour that will include stops in Bangladesh, Pakistan and Sri Lanka. He will also visit Indonesia before returning home May 6. Kaifu will make a keynote speech Monday to the Indian Parliament covering Japan's policy in Asia, officials said.
WORLD
June 1, 2008 | Henry Chu, Times Staff Writer
It was, you could say, only a matter of time. Today, Pakistan becomes the first nation in South Asia to adopt daylight saving time, pushing clocks forward by one hour. The three-month experiment is aimed, as elsewhere, at cutting energy costs by taking advantage of long summer days. But what might make practical sense for Pakistan is yet another headache for a region that already clocks up more than its share of chronological confusion. For residents of South Asia, figuring out what time it is in the next country, let alone beyond that, can be an exercise in frustration.
WORLD
January 24, 2008 | Julian E. Barnes, Times Staff Writer
The Pentagon is making plans to send military personnel to Pakistan to train its security forces, taking advantage of promising ties with the country's new top general, Defense officials say. The Bush administration has avoided using American troops in Pakistan because it would be deeply unpopular with many Pakistanis. The plans would limit the U.S. mission to instructing Pakistani trainers, officials said recently, speaking on condition of anonymity because the proposals are not final.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|