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October 7, 2003 | David G. Savage, Times Staff Writer
The Supreme Court refused to hear an appeal Monday from a South Carolina woman who was the first ever to be convicted of homicide for using illegal drugs during her pregnancy. In 1999, a mildly retarded Regina McKnight, then 26 years old, had a stillborn child. When medical tests showed the baby had trace elements from cocaine exposure, McKnight was indicted for "homicide by child abuse."
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NATIONAL
October 7, 2003 | David G. Savage, Times Staff Writer
The Supreme Court refused to hear an appeal Monday from a South Carolina woman who was the first ever to be convicted of homicide for using illegal drugs during her pregnancy. In 1999, a mildly retarded Regina McKnight, then 26 years old, had a stillborn child. When medical tests showed the baby had trace elements from cocaine exposure, McKnight was indicted for "homicide by child abuse."
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NEWS
July 17, 1996 | From Times Wire Services
In an unprecedented action, South Carolina's Supreme Court has ruled that a woman can be prosecuted for child abuse if she takes drugs during pregnancy. The court said a healthy, viable fetus can be considered a "child" or "person" under state law, and should, as a result, be afforded legal protection. The 3-2 ruling Monday marked the first time a state high court has approved such prosecutions. Top courts in Florida, Kentucky, Nevada and Ohio have all reached opposite conclusions.
NEWS
July 17, 1996 | From Times Wire Services
In an unprecedented action, South Carolina's Supreme Court has ruled that a woman can be prosecuted for child abuse if she takes drugs during pregnancy. The court said a healthy, viable fetus can be considered a "child" or "person" under state law, and should, as a result, be afforded legal protection. The 3-2 ruling Monday marked the first time a state high court has approved such prosecutions. Top courts in Florida, Kentucky, Nevada and Ohio have all reached opposite conclusions.
NEWS
September 5, 1992 | Special to The Times
The South Carolina Supreme Court has thrown out a lawsuit by a Greenville, S.C., man, who claimed $45 million in Andrew Wyeth paintings had been improperly sold to a Japanese company. The target of the lawsuit was Arthur Magill, who bought the paintings in 1979 and for 11 years allowed them to be displayed in the Greenville County Museum of Art. Magill had paid movie producer Joseph E. Levine $3.5 million for the collection, considered one of the finest of its kind in the nation.
NATIONAL
June 25, 2013 | By Timothy M. Phelps, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - The Supreme Court, deeply divided in a dispute involving the rights of parents and a law to protect Native American families, ruled Tuesday against the biological father of a 3-year-old girl who said their Native American heritage entitled him to custody. At the center of the case was Veronica, whom the justices called "Baby Girl" in their decision. Veronica was adopted at birth by a South Carolina couple with the consent of her mother, who is not named in court records.
NATIONAL
May 2, 2006 | David G. Savage, Times Staff Writer
With Justice Samuel A. Alito Jr. writing his first opinion, the Supreme Court on Monday overturned the murder conviction of a South Carolina man and said his lawyers had been wrongly barred from arguing that another man had committed the crime. "The Constitution guarantees criminal defendants a meaningful opportunity to present a complete defense," Alito said for a unanimous court.
FOOD
May 9, 1996 | CHARLES PERRY
Bordeaux winemakers worry that they're losing the younger market, reports the Wall Street Journal. Eight years ago, people younger than 35 made up 22% of Bordeaux wine buyers in France, but today that figure is only 17%. So the Bordeaux Wine Council has hired an ad agency to promote the idea of Bordeaux as fun wine for fun people.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 25, 2013 | By Robin Abcarian
Of all the people saddened by the news that the little girl named Veronica was forced to leave her biological father and return to her adoptive parents, it had not occurred to me that adult adoptees might be among those hardest hit. “You left out one important group in your article," wrote Tracy Hammond in an email that arrived shortly after I expressed sympathy for Dusten Brown, who relinquished his 4-year-old daughter to the...
NATIONAL
September 5, 2013 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske, This post has been updated. See note below for details.
In the latest twist in the high-profile custody battle over "Baby Veronica ," Oklahoma Gov. Mary Fallin has ordered the girl's biological father extradited to South Carolina to face felony charges for interfering with the custody of her adoptive parents. Fallin said she signed the extradition order after the father, Dusten Brown, failed to negotiate in good faith with the adoptive parents, Matt and Melanie Capobianco, over the fate of the 3-year-old girl. Veronica's birth mother was pregnant when she put the girl up for adoption.
NEWS
September 5, 1992 | Special to The Times
The South Carolina Supreme Court has thrown out a lawsuit by a Greenville, S.C., man, who claimed $45 million in Andrew Wyeth paintings had been improperly sold to a Japanese company. The target of the lawsuit was Arthur Magill, who bought the paintings in 1979 and for 11 years allowed them to be displayed in the Greenville County Museum of Art. Magill had paid movie producer Joseph E. Levine $3.5 million for the collection, considered one of the finest of its kind in the nation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 24, 2013 | By Robin Abcarian, This post has been corrected. See note below for details.
Was justice served Monday when a little girl called Veronica was taken from her biological father, a Cherokee, and returned to the white South Carolina couple who had begun to adopt her at birth four years ago? This is one of those heartbreaking stories that periodically makes headlines, sending a shiver down the spines of adoptive parents and enraging Native Americans whose children had been ripped away from them so often that a federal law was passed in 1978 to put safeguards in place.
NEWS
July 12, 1997 | BARRY SIEGEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It began with small hand-printed signs, posted now and then at the foot of the bridge joining this unruly South Carolina sea island to the mainland city of Charleston. Come to a meeting at the high school, the signs invited. Come help the new James Island Residential Assn. Bill "Cubby" Wilder saw one of those signs. He went to a meeting, then told others what was up. Eventually, Ron Middleton grew interested.
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