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South Carolina Economy

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BUSINESS
September 20, 1992 | JAMES FLANIGAN
The European currency crisis that spread fear and consternation throughout the world last week was both extremely close to and yet far away from South Carolina. This green and pleasant state of 3.5 million people--with proportionately more foreign investment than any other--is doing a little better than the rest of the country. Its unemployment rate at 6.5% is lower than the national average. And South Carolina doesn't much fear currency fluctuations.
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NEWS
January 21, 1997 | ERIC HARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An angel passing over this hardscrabble burg wouldn't mistake it for Bedford Falls, the quaint town in Frank Capra's Christmas classic, "It's a Wonderful Life." But Summerton, with its mix of modest homes, large Victorians and mom-and-pop businesses, seems frozen in roughly the same era.
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NEWS
January 21, 1997 | ERIC HARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An angel passing over this hardscrabble burg wouldn't mistake it for Bedford Falls, the quaint town in Frank Capra's Christmas classic, "It's a Wonderful Life." But Summerton, with its mix of modest homes, large Victorians and mom-and-pop businesses, seems frozen in roughly the same era.
NEWS
November 26, 1994 | ERIC HARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Paul Foerster moved to Spartanburg in 1967 as an executive with a German chemical-products firm, his new home, he says, "met all of the specifications of a sleepy little Southern mill town." There were few other foreign firms (or foreign-born residents, for that matter), and the ones that were here all were in some way related to textiles, far and away the dominant industry.
NEWS
November 26, 1994 | ERIC HARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Paul Foerster moved to Spartanburg in 1967 as an executive with a German chemical-products firm, his new home, he says, "met all of the specifications of a sleepy little Southern mill town." There were few other foreign firms (or foreign-born residents, for that matter), and the ones that were here all were in some way related to textiles, far and away the dominant industry.
NEWS
November 12, 1987 | OSWALD JOHNSTON, Times Staff Writer
For the past five years, billions of dollars in foreign investment capital has poured into the United States, undergirding the longest peacetime economic expansion in American history. And almost since the influx began, economists have warned darkly that the situation spells inescapable trouble down the road. If foreign investors pull back, as some feared they would after last month's stock market crash, then the U.S. economy will falter, the economists warn.
NATIONAL
February 21, 2009 | Richard Fausset
Would a governor in a state with the third-highest unemployment rate in the nation really say no to President Obama's stimulus money? That is the question reverberating through South Carolina, where Republican Mark Sanford -- a popular second-term governor and noted fiscal conservative -- says he may reject some of the $2.8 billion in federal funds headed to his state. Some observers suspect that the governor, who is regularly mentioned as a presidential contender in 2012, is just grandstanding.
NEWS
April 13, 2011 | By Lisa Mascaro
As Republicans criticize the $38 billion budget reduction package for not going far enough to cut federal spending, GOP Sen. Lindsey Graham decried what was left on the table: $40,000 for a port project in his home-state of South Carolina. Graham said Wednesday he would be voting against the 2011 spending deal struck between House Speaker John Boehner and President Obama because it failed to include federal funds he sought for a Charleston Harbor dredging study. “How do I go back home to the people of South Carolina and say, ‘Sorry’?
NATIONAL
June 12, 2002 | From Associated Press
A former congressman and South Carolina's lieutenant governor advanced to a runoff for the state's Republican gubernatorial nomination Tuesday, while North Dakota residents rejected a landmark ballot issue on financial privacy. Congressional primaries were also decided in Maine and South Carolina, as was the GOP gubernatorial primary in Maine. Former Rep. Mark Sanford and Lt. Gov.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 6, 1992 | VIRGINIA POSTREL, Virginia I. Postrel is the editor of Los Angeles-based Reason magazine. and
Except for a 6-month Army stint in New York state, my father has lived his entire life in the South. Now, after 28 years in South Carolina, he and my mother are moving--to Japan. That these lifelong Southerners will be spending the next year in Japan is of more than personal interest. Why they are moving tells a lot about the state of the Southern economy and explains why Pat Buchanan's message of economic nationalism has all but disappeared since the candidate crossed the Mason-Dixon Line.
BUSINESS
September 20, 1992 | JAMES FLANIGAN
The European currency crisis that spread fear and consternation throughout the world last week was both extremely close to and yet far away from South Carolina. This green and pleasant state of 3.5 million people--with proportionately more foreign investment than any other--is doing a little better than the rest of the country. Its unemployment rate at 6.5% is lower than the national average. And South Carolina doesn't much fear currency fluctuations.
NEWS
November 12, 1987 | OSWALD JOHNSTON, Times Staff Writer
For the past five years, billions of dollars in foreign investment capital has poured into the United States, undergirding the longest peacetime economic expansion in American history. And almost since the influx began, economists have warned darkly that the situation spells inescapable trouble down the road. If foreign investors pull back, as some feared they would after last month's stock market crash, then the U.S. economy will falter, the economists warn.
NATIONAL
August 5, 2003 | Elizabeth Shogren, Times Staff Writer
Sen. Ernest F. Hollings (D-S.C.) on Monday announced his plans to retire from the seat he has held since 1966, increasing Republican hopes for broadening their majority in the South and in the Senate. Even Hollings suggested that his departure could be good news for Republicans. "It wouldn't be easy for anybody who's a Democrat in this state to get elected," Hollings said in Columbia, S.C., after announcing his intention not to run in 2004, according to Associated Press.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 19, 2001
It was a G-rated scene in Sacramento a few weeks ago as members of the pornography industry--actors, strip club operators, sexual appliance distributors and, of course, 1st Amendment attorneys--made a carefully choreographed visit to lobby legislators and combat their back-alley image--the industry's image, that is.
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