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May 22, 1990 | LESLIE BERKMAN
Fluor Daniel, the primary construction and engineering subsidiary of Fluor Corp., said Monday that it has received a $19-million contract to engineer and build a unit to boost gasoline production at a refinery in Artesia, N.M. Navajo Refining Co., a subsidiary of Dallas-based Holly Corp., awarded the contract to Fluor in Irvine to provide engineering, procurement and construction services for the project, which is slated for completion in mid-1991.
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BUSINESS
June 28, 1991 | CRISTINA LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fluor Corp. and Duke Power Co. of Charlotte, N.C., Thursday jointly announced winning a contract valued at $450 million to build a coal-fired electric plant in South Carolina. The joint-venture company, Duke/Fluor Daniel, will build a 385-megawatt coal plant for South Carolina Electric & Gas Co. The plant will be in Orangeburg County, S.C., and is expected to generate enough power for about 385,000 homes, Fluor Daniel spokeswoman Deborah Land said.
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BUSINESS
June 28, 1991 | CRISTINA LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fluor Corp. and Duke Power Co. of Charlotte, N.C., Thursday jointly announced winning a contract valued at $450 million to build a coal-fired electric plant in South Carolina. The joint-venture company, Duke/Fluor Daniel, will build a 385-megawatt coal plant for South Carolina Electric & Gas Co. The plant will be in Orangeburg County, S.C., and is expected to generate enough power for about 385,000 homes, Fluor Daniel spokeswoman Deborah Land said.
BUSINESS
May 22, 1990 | LESLIE BERKMAN
Fluor Daniel, the primary construction and engineering subsidiary of Fluor Corp., said Monday that it has received a $19-million contract to engineer and build a unit to boost gasoline production at a refinery in Artesia, N.M. Navajo Refining Co., a subsidiary of Dallas-based Holly Corp., awarded the contract to Fluor in Irvine to provide engineering, procurement and construction services for the project, which is slated for completion in mid-1991.
FOOD
May 9, 1996 | CHARLES PERRY
Bordeaux winemakers worry that they're losing the younger market, reports the Wall Street Journal. Eight years ago, people younger than 35 made up 22% of Bordeaux wine buyers in France, but today that figure is only 17%. So the Bordeaux Wine Council has hired an ad agency to promote the idea of Bordeaux as fun wine for fun people.
NEWS
July 25, 1985 | From Times Wire Services
Hurricane Bob struck coastal communities in Georgia and South Carolina on Wednesday night with heavy rain, high tides and 75-m.p.h. winds, forcing thousands of persons to flee inland. The hurricane, the first of the Atlantic storm season, came ashore just north of Beaufort, S.C., after midnight, forecasters in Miami said. Several thousand persons moved inland as tides were whipped three to five feet above normal, said Paul Lunsford, a spokesman for the state emergency preparedness division.
NEWS
June 28, 1990 | JOHN O'DELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fluor Daniel, the engineering and construction arm of Fluor Corp., Wednesday landed what appears to be the largest contract in Fluor's 78-year history--estimated by sources to be worth $6 billion--to oversee expansion of petroleum facilities for Saudi Arabia. Fluor Chief Executive Les McCraw called the pact "prospectively, the most significant project we've had in over a decade."
NEWS
September 25, 1989 | LARRY GREEN and DOUGLAS JEHL, Times Staff Writers
As they have in revolution and Civil War, and after earthquake and fire, the bells of St. Michael's Episcopal Church rang out Sunday to celebrate this tattered and torn city's remarkable survival in the wake of Hurricane Hugo. "We may have been bent but we're not broken," said Christopher Cotton, the church's choirmaster, who led four parishioners and a visitor up 18 floors of narrow, winding stairs to manually ring the 225-year-old carillon bells, which usually work electrically.
NEWS
September 24, 1989 | LARRY GREEN and DOUG JEHL, Times Staff Writers
The people of the Carolinas, brought to ruin by Hurricane Hugo, jury-rigged their lives back together with pluck and ingenuity Saturday as the storm sputtered north, lost its punch as well as its name--and shut its evil eye for good. National Guardsmen by the hundreds patrolled streets. Police arrested at least 119 people for pillaging and breaking curfew. Authorities counted 18 dead in the Carolinas, two in Virginia and one in New York--bringing Hugo's weeklong toll to at least 48.
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