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South Carolina Federal Aid

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September 30, 1989 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, Times Staff Writer
Standing before television cameras and with a school bus crushed by a storm-tossed pine tree behind him, President Bush on Friday defended the efforts of the federal government in helping South Carolina rebuild after the devastation of Hurricane Hugo. One week after the storm's 135-m.p.h. winds churned through the state, the President viewed the results during an 80-minute tour of this small city set in forests of pines 20 miles northwest of Charleston.
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NEWS
October 7, 1989 | From Associated Press
The federal government has agreed to shoulder a greater-than-normal share of the financial burden for damage caused by Hurricane Hugo in South Carolina, the White House announced Friday. The federal government will pay 75% of all eligible costs up to $34 million, and above that amount it will pay all costs.
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NEWS
October 7, 1989 | From Associated Press
The federal government has agreed to shoulder a greater-than-normal share of the financial burden for damage caused by Hurricane Hugo in South Carolina, the White House announced Friday. The federal government will pay 75% of all eligible costs up to $34 million, and above that amount it will pay all costs.
NEWS
September 30, 1989 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, Times Staff Writer
Standing before television cameras and with a school bus crushed by a storm-tossed pine tree behind him, President Bush on Friday defended the efforts of the federal government in helping South Carolina rebuild after the devastation of Hurricane Hugo. One week after the storm's 135-m.p.h. winds churned through the state, the President viewed the results during an 80-minute tour of this small city set in forests of pines 20 miles northwest of Charleston.
NEWS
September 26, 1989 | MICHAEL J. YBARRA and KEVIN DAVIS, Times Staff Writers
Frustrated that desperately needed generators were sitting at an Army base three hours away while 75,000 residents in Charleston were without power, Sen. Ernest F. Hollings called the White House shortly before midnight on Sunday to demand more speedy help for South Carolina. White House Chief of Staff John H. Sununu promised to cut through the red tape, and late Monday the Democratic senator's aides were optimistic that the equipment would soon reach the suffering historic port town.
NEWS
September 26, 1989 | MICHAEL J. YBARRA and KEVIN DAVIS, Times Staff Writers
Frustrated that desperately needed generators were sitting at an Army base three hours away while 75,000 residents in Charleston were without power, Sen. Ernest F. Hollings called the White House shortly before midnight on Sunday to demand more speedy help for South Carolina. White House Chief of Staff John H. Sununu promised to cut through the red tape, and late Monday the Democratic senator's aides were optimistic that the equipment would soon reach the suffering historic port town.
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