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NEWS
July 2, 2000 | From Associated Press
After decades of debate and mounting pressure from an NAACP boycott, South Carolina finally removed the Confederate flag from atop its Statehouse on Saturday in a somber ceremony that paid tribute to its Civil War roots. The flag, seen as a reminder of slavery for some and a tribute to Southern heritage for others, flew atop the Statehouse dome for 38 years.
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NEWS
July 2, 2000 | From Associated Press
After decades of debate and mounting pressure from an NAACP boycott, South Carolina finally removed the Confederate flag from atop its Statehouse on Saturday in a somber ceremony that paid tribute to its Civil War roots. The flag, seen as a reminder of slavery for some and a tribute to Southern heritage for others, flew atop the Statehouse dome for 38 years.
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NEWS
February 15, 2000 | From Reuters
South Carolina Gov. Jim Hodges offered a compromise Monday in the debate over a Confederate battle flag, proposing that it be moved from atop the statehouse and flown instead at an adjacent memorial to a Confederate general. The battle flag that has flown over the South Carolina statehouse since 1962, when it was raised during Civil War centennial commemorations, has become an issue in the U.S. presidential campaign, with Democrats calling it a symbol of racism that should come down.
NEWS
May 19, 2000 | From Associated Press
Ending months of fierce debate, the South Carolina Legislature approved a compromise plan Thursday to move the Confederate flag from the Statehouse dome to a monument on the grounds. The bill goes to Democratic Gov. Jim Hodges, who said he would sign it. The flag will come down July 1. "I hope this represents the last battle of the Civil War," said Democratic state Sen. Dick Elliott.
NEWS
May 11, 2000 | SUE ANNE PRESSLEY, THE WASHINGTON POST
In a historic move, South Carolina's House of Representatives voted Wednesday night to remove the Confederate battle flag from atop the Statehouse dome. After 12 hours of debate Wednesday and five hours on Tuesday, the Republican-controlled House voted, 63 to 56, to accept a Senate compromise that would remove the flag July 1 and place it in a high-profile spot near the Confederate Soldiers Monument on the Statehouse grounds.
NEWS
February 22, 2000 | ELAINE DUTKA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dancer-choreographer Bill T. Jones, who has built an international reputation on the strength of his provocative works about social issues, has decided not to perform at Charleston, S.C.'s prestigious Spoleto USA arts festival in June unless the state removes the Confederate flag that flies over the state Capitol in Columbia.
NEWS
May 17, 2000 | From Reuters
The NAACP, fighting a compromise to move the Confederate battle flag from atop South Carolina's Statehouse to a nearby monument, threatened on Tuesday to step up an economic boycott of the state if its Senate did not reject the plan.
NEWS
December 24, 1996 | From Associated Press
Black state lawmakers Monday backed the governor's plan to take the Confederate battle flag off the Statehouse dome and move it to a monument nearby. The 35-member black caucus was divided as late as last week over whether to go along with the plan, which Gov. David Beasley offered in hopes of resolving the bitter dispute. "We recognize that not everybody is going to be satisfied in terms of this compromise, but it is a step forward," said state Rep.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 9, 1997 | From staff and wire reports
A South Carolina judge has ruled that the posting of the Ten Commandments by the Charleston County Council violates the U.S. Constitution and must come down. "Government may not affiliate itself with religious symbols or doctrines in a manner that suggests an endorsement of a particular religious faith," Circuit Court Judge R. Markley Dennis Jr. said in an opinion released this week. "Though religion may be acknowledged and accommodated by the state, it may not be promoted."
NEWS
April 19, 2000 | T. CHRISTIAN MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former Republican presidential candidate John W. McCain plans to go to South Carolina today, where he will announce his opposition to the Confederate flag flying above the state Capitol, sources said. The announcement is a marked shift from his comments during the heated primary season, in which McCain and rival George W. Bush refused to take a stand on the divisive issue during their battle to win the state's Feb. 19 contest.
NEWS
May 17, 2000 | From Reuters
The NAACP, fighting a compromise to move the Confederate battle flag from atop South Carolina's Statehouse to a nearby monument, threatened on Tuesday to step up an economic boycott of the state if its Senate did not reject the plan.
NEWS
May 11, 2000 | SUE ANNE PRESSLEY, THE WASHINGTON POST
In a historic move, South Carolina's House of Representatives voted Wednesday night to remove the Confederate battle flag from atop the Statehouse dome. After 12 hours of debate Wednesday and five hours on Tuesday, the Republican-controlled House voted, 63 to 56, to accept a Senate compromise that would remove the flag July 1 and place it in a high-profile spot near the Confederate Soldiers Monument on the Statehouse grounds.
NEWS
April 19, 2000 | T. CHRISTIAN MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former Republican presidential candidate John W. McCain plans to go to South Carolina today, where he will announce his opposition to the Confederate flag flying above the state Capitol, sources said. The announcement is a marked shift from his comments during the heated primary season, in which McCain and rival George W. Bush refused to take a stand on the divisive issue during their battle to win the state's Feb. 19 contest.
NEWS
February 22, 2000 | ELAINE DUTKA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dancer-choreographer Bill T. Jones, who has built an international reputation on the strength of his provocative works about social issues, has decided not to perform at Charleston, S.C.'s prestigious Spoleto USA arts festival in June unless the state removes the Confederate flag that flies over the state Capitol in Columbia.
NEWS
February 15, 2000 | From Reuters
South Carolina Gov. Jim Hodges offered a compromise Monday in the debate over a Confederate battle flag, proposing that it be moved from atop the statehouse and flown instead at an adjacent memorial to a Confederate general. The battle flag that has flown over the South Carolina statehouse since 1962, when it was raised during Civil War centennial commemorations, has become an issue in the U.S. presidential campaign, with Democrats calling it a symbol of racism that should come down.
NEWS
October 17, 1999 | From Associated Press
The NAACP's national board on Saturday unanimously approved a tourism boycott of South Carolina until the state stops flying the Confederate flag from its Capitol. The National Assn. for the Advancement of Colored People also asked the U.S. Justice Department to investigate whether official display of the symbol infringed on the civil rights of blacks.
NEWS
May 19, 2000 | From Associated Press
Ending months of fierce debate, the South Carolina Legislature approved a compromise plan Thursday to move the Confederate flag from the Statehouse dome to a monument on the grounds. The bill goes to Democratic Gov. Jim Hodges, who said he would sign it. The flag will come down July 1. "I hope this represents the last battle of the Civil War," said Democratic state Sen. Dick Elliott.
NEWS
November 28, 1996 | From Associated Press
Gov. David Beasley persuaded most of South Carolina's leading politicians Wednesday to join his effort to move the Confederate battle flag off the Statehouse dome. Beasley, a Republican, gathered the bipartisan support in hopes of resolving a bitter feud over the flag, which many blacks say symbolizes slavery and racism. The compromise would move it to a Confederate monument on the Statehouse grounds. U.S. Sen.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 9, 1997 | From staff and wire reports
A South Carolina judge has ruled that the posting of the Ten Commandments by the Charleston County Council violates the U.S. Constitution and must come down. "Government may not affiliate itself with religious symbols or doctrines in a manner that suggests an endorsement of a particular religious faith," Circuit Court Judge R. Markley Dennis Jr. said in an opinion released this week. "Though religion may be acknowledged and accommodated by the state, it may not be promoted."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 19, 1997
South Carolina has become the most recent battle zone in the debate over the right to post the Ten Commandments in a government building. Three Charleston residents have filed a lawsuit to block the county council from hanging the Ten Commandments in its chambers, saying it would violate the 1st Amendment guarantee of freedom of religion.
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