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NEWS
February 16, 1989 | CATHLEEN DECKER, Times Staff Writer
President Bush, taking advantage of the congressional recess to pump more life into his budget proposals, Wednesday defended his beleaguered plan to cut taxes on capital gains as a necessary tool to promote jobs and even the odds for American companies battling foreign competitors. Delivering a self-congratulatory but persistently sketchy portrayal of his national priorities to the South Carolina Legislature, Bush renewed his call for approval of his $1.
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NEWS
February 20, 2000 | From Associated Press
The national NAACP decided Saturday to continue its economic boycott against South Carolina over the state's flying of the Confederate flag atop its capitol. "It is not just a piece of cloth. This is about the dignity of people," Kweisi Mfume, the president of the National Assn. for the Advancement of Colored People, said at its 91st annual meeting. NAACP leaders also announced plans for a march next month on the Florida Capitol in Tallahassee to protest Gov.
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NEWS
September 23, 1989 | MELISSA HEALY, Times Staff Writer
Among many South Carolina coastal residents crammed into inland shelters, only one name on Friday was less popular than Hugo's--that of their governor, Carroll A. Campbell Jr. Early Friday, after the worst of the hurricane's tempest had passed, Myrtle Beach Mayor Bob Grissom gave the go-ahead for residents to return to their homes, sparking massive defections from inland evacuation centers.
NEWS
November 28, 1996 | From Associated Press
Gov. David Beasley persuaded most of South Carolina's leading politicians Wednesday to join his effort to move the Confederate battle flag off the Statehouse dome. Beasley, a Republican, gathered the bipartisan support in hopes of resolving a bitter feud over the flag, which many blacks say symbolizes slavery and racism. The compromise would move it to a Confederate monument on the Statehouse grounds. U.S. Sen.
NEWS
August 29, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The undercover operation aimed at corruption in the South Carolina Statehouse was formally closed after netting 28 people on vote selling or drug charges. "While two cases await trial and numerous defendants await sentencing, there will be no further indictments," U.S. Atty. Bart Daniel said. The FBI sting nicknamed Operation Lost Trust began in Columbia nearly three years ago, using a lobbyist and former legislator as an informant and operative.
NEWS
November 28, 1996 | From Associated Press
Gov. David Beasley persuaded most of South Carolina's leading politicians Wednesday to join his effort to move the Confederate battle flag off the Statehouse dome. Beasley, a Republican, gathered the bipartisan support in hopes of resolving a bitter feud over the flag, which many blacks say symbolizes slavery and racism. The compromise would move it to a Confederate monument on the Statehouse grounds. U.S. Sen.
NEWS
February 20, 2000 | From Associated Press
The national NAACP decided Saturday to continue its economic boycott against South Carolina over the state's flying of the Confederate flag atop its capitol. "It is not just a piece of cloth. This is about the dignity of people," Kweisi Mfume, the president of the National Assn. for the Advancement of Colored People, said at its 91st annual meeting. NAACP leaders also announced plans for a march next month on the Florida Capitol in Tallahassee to protest Gov.
NEWS
November 27, 1996 | ERIC HARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Troubled by church burnings, drive-by shootings and other signs of growing racial divisiveness, Gov. David Beasley called Tuesday night for hauling down the Confederate battle flag from atop the state Capitol, the last statehouse from which it still flies. But the gesture, which he has planned for days and had hoped would help unite the races, turned instead into an extraordinary and contentious debate--not just about the flag but about the meaning and morality of Southern history.
NEWS
January 5, 1991 | From Associated Press
The second-ranking lawmaker in the South Carolina House and a highway commissioner were indicted Friday on federal corruption charges, bringing to 13 the number of people accused in an investigation of vote-selling. A federal grand jury indicted House Speaker Pro Tem Jack Rogers on charges of racketeering, bribery, witness tampering and extortion in extracting thousands of dollars from lobbyists.
NEWS
August 25, 1990 | LEE MAY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The cloud hanging over the South Carolina Legislature burst dramatically Friday as five lawmakers were indicted on federal charges that they "sold their votes for cash." A federal grand jury in Columbia, the state capital, returned felony indictments against state Sen. William Lee and state Reps. Daniel Winstead, Robert Brown, Robert Kohn and Luther Taylor, charging them with accepting bribes in exchange for support of a parimutuel betting bill.
NEWS
November 27, 1996 | ERIC HARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Troubled by church burnings, drive-by shootings and other signs of growing racial divisiveness, Gov. David Beasley called Tuesday night for hauling down the Confederate battle flag from atop the state Capitol, the last statehouse from which it still flies. But the gesture, which he has planned for days and had hoped would help unite the races, turned instead into an extraordinary and contentious debate--not just about the flag but about the meaning and morality of Southern history.
NEWS
August 29, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The undercover operation aimed at corruption in the South Carolina Statehouse was formally closed after netting 28 people on vote selling or drug charges. "While two cases await trial and numerous defendants await sentencing, there will be no further indictments," U.S. Atty. Bart Daniel said. The FBI sting nicknamed Operation Lost Trust began in Columbia nearly three years ago, using a lobbyist and former legislator as an informant and operative.
NEWS
January 5, 1991 | From Associated Press
The second-ranking lawmaker in the South Carolina House and a highway commissioner were indicted Friday on federal corruption charges, bringing to 13 the number of people accused in an investigation of vote-selling. A federal grand jury indicted House Speaker Pro Tem Jack Rogers on charges of racketeering, bribery, witness tampering and extortion in extracting thousands of dollars from lobbyists.
NEWS
September 22, 1990 | From Associated Press
A federal grand jury on Friday indicted five more legislators on charges involving bribery and drugs, bringing to 10 the number of lawmakers charged as a result of an FBI investigation of the South Carolina Statehouse. In addition, a registered lobbyist was indicted on a drug possession charge. The indictments grew out of an FBI investigation into vote-buying in the South Carolina General Assembly. Of five legislators charged in August, three have pleaded guilty.
NEWS
August 25, 1990 | LEE MAY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The cloud hanging over the South Carolina Legislature burst dramatically Friday as five lawmakers were indicted on federal charges that they "sold their votes for cash." A federal grand jury in Columbia, the state capital, returned felony indictments against state Sen. William Lee and state Reps. Daniel Winstead, Robert Brown, Robert Kohn and Luther Taylor, charging them with accepting bribes in exchange for support of a parimutuel betting bill.
NEWS
July 31, 1990 | LEE MAY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A cloud similar to the one that enveloped the California Legislature two years ago has now settled over Columbia, the South Carolina capital. An FBI sting aimed at rooting out possible corruption in the Legislature has rocked state lawmakers and undermined reputations, although no charges have been filed yet. Federal agents have subpoenaed all campaign spending records for every one of the state's 124 House members and 46 state senators.
NEWS
July 31, 1990 | LEE MAY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A cloud similar to the one that enveloped the California Legislature two years ago has now settled over Columbia, the South Carolina capital. An FBI sting aimed at rooting out possible corruption in the Legislature has rocked state lawmakers and undermined reputations, although no charges have been filed yet. Federal agents have subpoenaed all campaign spending records for every one of the state's 124 House members and 46 state senators.
NEWS
September 22, 1990 | From Associated Press
A federal grand jury on Friday indicted five more legislators on charges involving bribery and drugs, bringing to 10 the number of lawmakers charged as a result of an FBI investigation of the South Carolina Statehouse. In addition, a registered lobbyist was indicted on a drug possession charge. The indictments grew out of an FBI investigation into vote-buying in the South Carolina General Assembly. Of five legislators charged in August, three have pleaded guilty.
NEWS
September 23, 1989 | MELISSA HEALY, Times Staff Writer
Among many South Carolina coastal residents crammed into inland shelters, only one name on Friday was less popular than Hugo's--that of their governor, Carroll A. Campbell Jr. Early Friday, after the worst of the hurricane's tempest had passed, Myrtle Beach Mayor Bob Grissom gave the go-ahead for residents to return to their homes, sparking massive defections from inland evacuation centers.
NEWS
February 16, 1989 | CATHLEEN DECKER, Times Staff Writer
President Bush, taking advantage of the congressional recess to pump more life into his budget proposals, Wednesday defended his beleaguered plan to cut taxes on capital gains as a necessary tool to promote jobs and even the odds for American companies battling foreign competitors. Delivering a self-congratulatory but persistently sketchy portrayal of his national priorities to the South Carolina Legislature, Bush renewed his call for approval of his $1.
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