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South Carolina Health

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 27, 1989 | Compiled from Times staff and wire reports
A study of hospital records in South Carolina reported Thursday in the Journal of the American Medical Assn. showed that many AIDS cases go unreported to health authorities. Using a computerized record of hospital discharge diagnoses for an 18-month period in 1986 and 1987, researchers from the state's Department of Health and Environmental Control found that only 91 of 153 AIDS cases were reported to the state's AIDS registry, with nearly half the blacks with the disease going unreported.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 27, 1989 | Compiled from Times staff and wire reports
A study of hospital records in South Carolina reported Thursday in the Journal of the American Medical Assn. showed that many AIDS cases go unreported to health authorities. Using a computerized record of hospital discharge diagnoses for an 18-month period in 1986 and 1987, researchers from the state's Department of Health and Environmental Control found that only 91 of 153 AIDS cases were reported to the state's AIDS registry, with nearly half the blacks with the disease going unreported.
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SCIENCE
July 8, 2003 | Allison M. Heinrichs, Times Staff Writer
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention confirmed Monday that an elderly South Carolina man has tested positive for West Nile virus, the first human case reported this year. The man was bitten by a mosquito carrying the disease while he was fishing in late May and was hospitalized in June. The mosquito-borne disease killed 284 people in the United States last year and struck at least 4,150.
NEWS
March 26, 1997 | ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The federal government plans to more than double the number of states where it is aggressively combating fraud in Medicare and Medicaid, officials said, warning that some criminals active in the drug trade are targeting the health care system.
SCIENCE
December 2, 2013 | By Melissa Healy
A comprehensive new look at how mothers fill their hours suggests it's time to revise the old saw "A man may work from sun to sun. But a woman's work is never done. " The new saw should be, "24/7, there's something to see. Make your own bed, I'm watching TV. " Compared to mothers with kids between ages 5 and 18 at home in 1965, contemporary moms spend on average 11 fewer hours per week in physical activity -- including housework, meal preparation, childĀ  care, laundry and exercise.
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