Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSouth Carolina Industry
IN THE NEWS

South Carolina Industry

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
June 8, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
BMW Reportedly Picks South Carolina for U.S. Plant: German luxury car maker BMW has picked the Greenville-Spartanburg area of South Carolina as the site of its planned U.S. plant, the newsmagazine Der Spiegel said. BMW officials in Germany were not immediately available for comment, but an executive with BMW of North America said a decision has not been made. The newsmagazine said BMW chief Eberhard von Kuenheim will officially announce the decision in two weeks.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
November 26, 1994 | ERIC HARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Paul Foerster moved to Spartanburg in 1967 as an executive with a German chemical-products firm, his new home, he says, "met all of the specifications of a sleepy little Southern mill town." There were few other foreign firms (or foreign-born residents, for that matter), and the ones that were here all were in some way related to textiles, far and away the dominant industry.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
September 20, 1992 | JAMES FLANIGAN
The European currency crisis that spread fear and consternation throughout the world last week was both extremely close to and yet far away from South Carolina. This green and pleasant state of 3.5 million people--with proportionately more foreign investment than any other--is doing a little better than the rest of the country. Its unemployment rate at 6.5% is lower than the national average. And South Carolina doesn't much fear currency fluctuations.
BUSINESS
September 20, 1992 | JAMES FLANIGAN
The European currency crisis that spread fear and consternation throughout the world last week was both extremely close to and yet far away from South Carolina. This green and pleasant state of 3.5 million people--with proportionately more foreign investment than any other--is doing a little better than the rest of the country. Its unemployment rate at 6.5% is lower than the national average. And South Carolina doesn't much fear currency fluctuations.
NEWS
November 26, 1994 | ERIC HARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Paul Foerster moved to Spartanburg in 1967 as an executive with a German chemical-products firm, his new home, he says, "met all of the specifications of a sleepy little Southern mill town." There were few other foreign firms (or foreign-born residents, for that matter), and the ones that were here all were in some way related to textiles, far and away the dominant industry.
NEWS
November 24, 1991 | By H. JOSEF HEBERT, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Commercial nuclear power plants have averaged more than one fine a week and paid $18.5 million since 1987 for safety violations ranging from improper release of radioactivity to workers sleeping on the job, according to government documents.
NEWS
April 7, 1993 | LYN RIDDLE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Here on the southern tip of South Carolina, amid moss-draped live oaks and sodden marshes, conservationists have worked for four years to protect 350,000 acres of pristine riverfront property that is home to ducks, storks, bald eagles, sea turtles and other wild creatures. But now they fear their efforts may be harmed if the state Department of Highways and Public Transportation goes ahead with plans to widen a two-lane road to four lanes.
NEWS
March 6, 1988 | JOHN BALZAR, Times Political Writer
Despite every effort by opponents to slow him down before he runs away with all of the South, George Bush overwhelmingly won the South Carolina Republican presidential primary Saturday. The vice president, who just a month ago limped out of Iowa a humbled loser, now stands exactly where he wants to be: a big winner, the wind at his back, with just two days to go to the colossal 17-state GOP Super Tuesday contest. Sen.
BUSINESS
July 23, 2001 | MARLA DICKERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Conservation and power-plant construction may be obvious ways of dealing with California's power crunch. But a Monrovia company is touting a less transparent remedy: fog. Using the same technology that has clouded theme parks and disco floors, Mee Industries Inc. is using its man-made fog to help power-plant turbines run more efficiently in hot weather.
NEWS
November 25, 1994 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For opponents of the sweeping world trade agreement that faces a critical congressional vote next week, it is not the impact on vulnerable industries and their workers that is keeping them awake at night. It's a more fundamental, deep-seated fear of diminished American sovereignty that is giving many House and Senate members the shakes, a once-potent theme that has been relatively dormant in U.S. politics for decades.
BUSINESS
June 8, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
BMW Reportedly Picks South Carolina for U.S. Plant: German luxury car maker BMW has picked the Greenville-Spartanburg area of South Carolina as the site of its planned U.S. plant, the newsmagazine Der Spiegel said. BMW officials in Germany were not immediately available for comment, but an executive with BMW of North America said a decision has not been made. The newsmagazine said BMW chief Eberhard von Kuenheim will officially announce the decision in two weeks.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 2005 | Diane Haithman, Times Staff Writer
SOME WERE IN TEARS AFTER CLASS. Kar-on Brown Lehman's students at the Los Angeles County High School for the Arts were about to present their latest dance creations at Pasadena City College as part of the high school's Student Choreography Showcase 2005. So they'd been honored that, two days before the event, they would have the opportunity to present those creations before guest instructor Bill T. Jones, artistic director of the acclaimed Bill T. Jones/Arnie Zane Dance Company.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|