Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSouth Carolina Laws
IN THE NEWS

South Carolina Laws

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
February 28, 1998 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A South Carolina woman whose newborn son tested positive for cocaine was sent to jail Friday under a first-in-the-nation court ruling that permits use of child endangerment laws to prosecute women who use drugs during pregnancy. Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist turned down an emergency plea to block the woman's incarceration while her lawyers appeal her conviction in the Supreme Court.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 4, 2001 | JEFFREY GETTLEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the shadow of a 200-foot-tall Day-Glo sombrero, the pyrotechnic pilgrimage to the state of South Carolina reaches its annual peak, and one sound is loudest of all: the rattle of shopping carts.
Advertisement
NEWS
June 28, 2000 | From Associated Press
In the biggest rollback of legalized gambling in U.S. history, South Carolina will pull the plug on more than 22,000 video gambling machines at midnight Friday. The gambling industry dominated South Carolina for more than a decade, helping to topple a governor and having its way with the courts and politicians before the Legislature voted last year to end video gambling by July 1 unless voters decided to keep the machines.
NEWS
February 27, 2001 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Supreme Court on Monday turned aside a challenge to a 27-page listing of abortion clinic regulations in South Carolina that some doctors complained are so burdensome that they undermine the right of women to obtain the procedure. Four doctors who perform most of the state's abortions had challenged the law. After the Supreme Court decision, their lawyers immediately asked a lower federal court to temporarily prevent the rules from taking effect.
NEWS
May 2, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Gov. Jim Hodges, in Columbia, S.C., signed a bill that officially institutes a Martin Luther King Jr. holiday for state workers in South Carolina, but the NAACP criticized the measure because it also creates a Confederate Memorial Day. South Carolina became the last state in the nation to fully recognize the King holiday as a day off for all state workers. Before, state employees could choose to take the day off.
NEWS
March 1, 1989
South Carolina will ban 32 states and Puerto Rico from disposing hazardous waste within its borders beginning today, state health officials announced. The ban, which affects such heavy landfill users as Florida and North Carolina, resulted from Gov. Carroll A. Campbell Jr.'s executive order Jan. 18 saying that, beginning March 1, the state would prohibit the disposal of waste from any state that refused to dispose of it itself.
NEWS
February 27, 2001 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Supreme Court on Monday turned aside a challenge to a 27-page listing of abortion clinic regulations in South Carolina that some doctors complained are so burdensome that they undermine the right of women to obtain the procedure. Four doctors who perform most of the state's abortions had challenged the law. After the Supreme Court decision, their lawyers immediately asked a lower federal court to temporarily prevent the rules from taking effect.
NEWS
July 4, 2001 | JEFFREY GETTLEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the shadow of a 200-foot-tall Day-Glo sombrero, the pyrotechnic pilgrimage to the state of South Carolina reaches its annual peak, and one sound is loudest of all: the rattle of shopping carts.
NATIONAL
October 1, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
Administrators at Fort Mill High School decided to remove gay marriage and stem cell research from a planned student debate out of concern that they might clash with a state law on sex education. The topics were on a list of eight approved by Principal David Damm for use in a student-run debate intended to mirror the presidential debates.
NEWS
May 1, 1994 | from Associated Press
Henry Kay survived a concentration camp because the Nazis needed children to make weapons. Now, children of a more peaceful era will learn the lessons of his life and the lives of other Holocaust victims. Kay was present Friday when Gov. Lawton Chiles signed into law a requirement that Florida pupils learn about the slaughter of Jews and others during World War II. "I would never have dreamed of being here," the 64-year-old Kay said.
NEWS
June 28, 2000 | From Associated Press
In the biggest rollback of legalized gambling in U.S. history, South Carolina will pull the plug on more than 22,000 video gambling machines at midnight Friday. The gambling industry dominated South Carolina for more than a decade, helping to topple a governor and having its way with the courts and politicians before the Legislature voted last year to end video gambling by July 1 unless voters decided to keep the machines.
NEWS
May 2, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Gov. Jim Hodges, in Columbia, S.C., signed a bill that officially institutes a Martin Luther King Jr. holiday for state workers in South Carolina, but the NAACP criticized the measure because it also creates a Confederate Memorial Day. South Carolina became the last state in the nation to fully recognize the King holiday as a day off for all state workers. Before, state employees could choose to take the day off.
NEWS
February 28, 1998 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A South Carolina woman whose newborn son tested positive for cocaine was sent to jail Friday under a first-in-the-nation court ruling that permits use of child endangerment laws to prosecute women who use drugs during pregnancy. Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist turned down an emergency plea to block the woman's incarceration while her lawyers appeal her conviction in the Supreme Court.
NEWS
March 1, 1989
South Carolina will ban 32 states and Puerto Rico from disposing hazardous waste within its borders beginning today, state health officials announced. The ban, which affects such heavy landfill users as Florida and North Carolina, resulted from Gov. Carroll A. Campbell Jr.'s executive order Jan. 18 saying that, beginning March 1, the state would prohibit the disposal of waste from any state that refused to dispose of it itself.
NATIONAL
October 10, 2006 | Lianne Hart, Times Staff Writer
With the election just a month away, politicians examining ways to stop violent sexual offenders from striking again are increasingly calling for laws that would allow states to execute repeat child molesters. Texas Lt. Gov. David Dewhurst is the latest to join the effort, proposing a plan Oct. 3 that would require a minimum mandatory prison sentence of 25 years for first-time offenders and the possibility of death for a second conviction.
NEWS
April 27, 1990 | HOLLY SELBY, THE BALTIMORE SUN
Two months ago, a 29-year-old Iowa mother of two challenged the way Americans view victims of rape. She did it by allowing a newspaper, the Des Moines Register, to print the story of her Nov. 19, 1988, rape and its aftermath--her struggles to overcome her fear, tell her children, make love with her husband. And she allowed the newspaper to print her name--Nancy Ziegenmeyer.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|