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NEWS
November 18, 1992 | MICHAEL ROSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In naming Richard W. Riley as personnel director for his transition team, President-elect Bill Clinton draws on the talents of someone much like himself: a centrist Southern Democrat who was the first person to win two terms as governor of South Carolina by tempering his instincts as a reformer with an ability to compromise. Indeed, for many years the political careers of the two governors proceeded along remarkably parallel tracks.
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NEWS
May 19, 2000 | From Associated Press
Ending months of fierce debate, the South Carolina Legislature approved a compromise plan Thursday to move the Confederate flag from the Statehouse dome to a monument on the grounds. The bill goes to Democratic Gov. Jim Hodges, who said he would sign it. The flag will come down July 1. "I hope this represents the last battle of the Civil War," said Democratic state Sen. Dick Elliott.
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NEWS
February 23, 1988 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, Times Staff Writer
Monday was supposed to be a big day for George Bush: His opening campaign visit to South Carolina 12 days before the state's primary election--a contest he hopes will propel him to victory three days later on Super Tuesday, when one-third of the delegates to the Republican National Convention will be chosen. But on his flight to Myrtle Beach, after a quiet day off back home in Houston, Bush received a telephone call from Sen.
NEWS
May 11, 2000 | SUE ANNE PRESSLEY, THE WASHINGTON POST
In a historic move, South Carolina's House of Representatives voted Wednesday night to remove the Confederate battle flag from atop the Statehouse dome. After 12 hours of debate Wednesday and five hours on Tuesday, the Republican-controlled House voted, 63 to 56, to accept a Senate compromise that would remove the flag July 1 and place it in a high-profile spot near the Confederate Soldiers Monument on the Statehouse grounds.
NEWS
February 14, 1996 | ERIC HARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Folks have been spreading stories about Strom Thurmond for as long as he's been in politics. They told stories about his health habits, stories about his hair implants, stories about his eye for the ladies, particularly young ladies. None of it did any harm. It just added to his legend. Nor did it matter when he switched from the Democratic Party to the Republican side.
NEWS
May 11, 2000 | SUE ANNE PRESSLEY, THE WASHINGTON POST
In a historic move, South Carolina's House of Representatives voted Wednesday night to remove the Confederate battle flag from atop the Statehouse dome. After 12 hours of debate Wednesday and five hours on Tuesday, the Republican-controlled House voted, 63 to 56, to accept a Senate compromise that would remove the flag July 1 and place it in a high-profile spot near the Confederate Soldiers Monument on the Statehouse grounds.
NEWS
March 2, 1996 | ELEANOR RANDOLPH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Decked out like the Marlboro man in a black hat and cowboy garb a few days ago in Arizona, Patrick J. Buchanan has a new image in the Deep South, both in style and substance sounding like the good ol' boy of the Grand Old Party. Trolling for votes in today's South Carolina primary, Buchanan has adopted the argot of the region, dropping his "g's" and stretching his syllables.
NEWS
January 16, 1996 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
This could be where the race for the Republican presidential nomination ends. Or really begins. Reporters and candidates don't move into South Carolina for weeks at a time, as they do in Iowa and New Hampshire, the traditional first two stops on the campaign calendar. But in recent years, South Carolina has combined with those two preliminary contests to define, and even settle, the battle for the GOP nomination. "Iowa and New Hampshire get the attention," says Republican state Sen.
NEWS
May 19, 2000 | From Associated Press
Ending months of fierce debate, the South Carolina Legislature approved a compromise plan Thursday to move the Confederate flag from the Statehouse dome to a monument on the grounds. The bill goes to Democratic Gov. Jim Hodges, who said he would sign it. The flag will come down July 1. "I hope this represents the last battle of the Civil War," said Democratic state Sen. Dick Elliott.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 19, 2000 | PATRICK MCGREEVY
City Councilman Joel Wachs called Tuesday for Los Angeles to join a boycott of South Carolina until the Legislature there removes the Confederate flag from its statehouse, saying the pendant is a symbol of racism. The motion by Wachs, to be considered by the full council next week, would prohibit city employees from visiting South Carolina at government expense until the flag is taken down. Wachs also sought a U.S.
NEWS
February 21, 2000 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN, Ronald Brownstein's column appears in this space every Monday
At a news conference the day before his resounding victory in South Carolina, George W. Bush was asked whether three months ago--flush with money, laden with endorsements, lionized as the inevitable nominee--he had any inkling that he'd be locked in such a fierce battle with John McCain. "I knew there would be some tough moments," Bush said. "But that's when we get to find out what the candidate's made out of. That's when we get to find out what the future president is made out of."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 19, 2000 | PATRICK MCGREEVY
City Councilman Joel Wachs called Tuesday for Los Angeles to join a boycott of South Carolina until the Legislature there removes the Confederate flag from its statehouse, saying the pendant is a symbol of racism. The motion by Wachs, to be considered by the full council next week, would prohibit city employees from visiting South Carolina at government expense until the flag is taken down. Wachs also sought a U.S.
NEWS
January 14, 2000 | ANNE-MARIE O'CONNOR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The controversy over the Confederate flag at the statehouse has been raging for years in South Carolina, but now it is spilling into the presidential campaign, drawing Texas Gov. George W. Bush and Sen. John McCain of Arizona into the high-profile dispute as they try to court Republican voters in the state. For Bush and McCain, wading into the racially charged flag issue is a highly unwelcome prospect as they woo conservative voters in the important Feb.
NEWS
March 2, 1996 | ELEANOR RANDOLPH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Decked out like the Marlboro man in a black hat and cowboy garb a few days ago in Arizona, Patrick J. Buchanan has a new image in the Deep South, both in style and substance sounding like the good ol' boy of the Grand Old Party. Trolling for votes in today's South Carolina primary, Buchanan has adopted the argot of the region, dropping his "g's" and stretching his syllables.
NEWS
February 14, 1996 | ERIC HARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Folks have been spreading stories about Strom Thurmond for as long as he's been in politics. They told stories about his health habits, stories about his hair implants, stories about his eye for the ladies, particularly young ladies. None of it did any harm. It just added to his legend. Nor did it matter when he switched from the Democratic Party to the Republican side.
NEWS
January 16, 1996 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
This could be where the race for the Republican presidential nomination ends. Or really begins. Reporters and candidates don't move into South Carolina for weeks at a time, as they do in Iowa and New Hampshire, the traditional first two stops on the campaign calendar. But in recent years, South Carolina has combined with those two preliminary contests to define, and even settle, the battle for the GOP nomination. "Iowa and New Hampshire get the attention," says Republican state Sen.
NEWS
January 14, 2000 | ANNE-MARIE O'CONNOR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The controversy over the Confederate flag at the statehouse has been raging for years in South Carolina, but now it is spilling into the presidential campaign, drawing Texas Gov. George W. Bush and Sen. John McCain of Arizona into the high-profile dispute as they try to court Republican voters in the state. For Bush and McCain, wading into the racially charged flag issue is a highly unwelcome prospect as they woo conservative voters in the important Feb.
NEWS
February 21, 2000 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN, Ronald Brownstein's column appears in this space every Monday
At a news conference the day before his resounding victory in South Carolina, George W. Bush was asked whether three months ago--flush with money, laden with endorsements, lionized as the inevitable nominee--he had any inkling that he'd be locked in such a fierce battle with John McCain. "I knew there would be some tough moments," Bush said. "But that's when we get to find out what the candidate's made out of. That's when we get to find out what the future president is made out of."
NEWS
November 18, 1992 | MICHAEL ROSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In naming Richard W. Riley as personnel director for his transition team, President-elect Bill Clinton draws on the talents of someone much like himself: a centrist Southern Democrat who was the first person to win two terms as governor of South Carolina by tempering his instincts as a reformer with an ability to compromise. Indeed, for many years the political careers of the two governors proceeded along remarkably parallel tracks.
NEWS
February 23, 1988 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, Times Staff Writer
Monday was supposed to be a big day for George Bush: His opening campaign visit to South Carolina 12 days before the state's primary election--a contest he hopes will propel him to victory three days later on Super Tuesday, when one-third of the delegates to the Republican National Convention will be chosen. But on his flight to Myrtle Beach, after a quiet day off back home in Houston, Bush received a telephone call from Sen.
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