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South Carolina Primary

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NEWS
March 7, 1992 | SONNI EFRON and PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Arkansas Gov. Bill Clinton came under double-barreled attack Friday from two of his Democratic presidential rivals, as former Massachusetts Sen. Paul E. Tsongas called him "cynical and unprincipled" and Iowa Sen. Tom Harkin charged him with "insensitivity" on racial issues. Harkin, campaigning in South Carolina, called on Clinton to apologize for a newspaper photograph published Tuesday in the New York Times that showed Clinton and Georgia Sen.
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OPINION
January 24, 2012
That guy Gingrich Re "Gingrich wins big in S. Carolina," Jan. 22 Will the Republican Party, the so-called family values party, really offer up Newt Gingrich as its standard- bearer? Gingrich condemned President Clinton for his indiscretions while at the same time he was taking a parallel path. He denies his ex-wife's claim that he wanted an open marriage. He committed numerous ethics violations as speaker of the House. And this is the man Republicans in South Carolina voted for?
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NEWS
February 19, 2000
Broadway Bush? Pulling a page from Joe Namath's playbook, George W. Bush has taken the bold step of guaranteeing a win in today's South Carolina primary. "You can write it down on your pad of paper: Bush wins," the Republican presidential contender said Friday in Charleston. Yet while Namath, the flamboyant New York Jets quarterback, led his team to win the 1969 Super Bowl game as he boasted they would, Bush has a lesser record of predictions. After promising a win in the Feb.
NEWS
January 21, 2012 | By Mark Z. Barabak
Newt Gingrich surged to victory Saturday in the South Carolina primary, riding a pair of strong debate performances to overtake Mitt Romney and stop his seemingly relentless march to the GOP nomination. Television networks called the race for the former House speaker almost immediately after the polls closed, a repeat of what happened 11 days ago in New Hampshire, but with a much different result. Former Massachusetts Gov. Romney appeared headed for second place, with former Sen. Rick Santorum  of Pennsylvania and Rep. Ron Paul of Texas trailing well behind.
NATIONAL
December 11, 2003 | James Rainey, Times Staff Writer
Rep. Richard A. Gephardt picked up a key endorsement Wednesday from Rep. James E. Clyburn of South Carolina, the leading African American politician in a state that will be the first to test the strength of Democratic presidential contenders in the South and among black voters. Clyburn announced in a conference call that he would back his longtime House colleague, saying he chose Gephardt because the Missourian was a "solid thinker and a really compassionate guy ... [who] has always been No.
NEWS
February 20, 2000 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
In an election year supposedly all about character, George W. Bush used a powerful ideological appeal to overwhelm John McCain in Saturday's South Carolina primary and regain the upper hand in the GOP presidential race. By relentlessly challenging McCain's conservative credentials on taxes and campaign finance reform, and attacking him as a Washington insider, Bush amassed huge advantages among Republican and conservative voters.
NATIONAL
January 19, 2008 | Michael Finnegan, Times Staff Writer
. -- The Confederate flag, abortion and same-sex marriage jumped to the forefront of the Republican presidential race as the candidates scrambled for support in today's South Carolina primary. Whoever takes the campaign's first Southern contest will have much-needed momentum going into Florida's Jan. 29 primary and the coast-to-coast battle Feb. 5. Voters crowned different winners in Iowa, New Hampshire and Michigan this month.
NATIONAL
January 21, 2008 | Seema Mehta, Peter Nicholas and Stephen Braun, Times Staff Writers
Racial politics, complaints and the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.'s legacy dominated discourse in the Democratic presidential contest Sunday as Nevada caucus winner Hillary Rodham Clinton and Barack Obama sought to shore up their bases for the South Carolina primary Jan. 26. The new Republican presidential front-runner, John McCain, meanwhile, pivoted from his South Carolina win to Florida's Jan.
NEWS
February 20, 2000 | MARK Z. BARABAK, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
George W. Bush romped to a decisive victory Saturday in the South Carolina presidential primary, blunting the challenge of John McCain and firmly reestablishing his command of the race for the GOP nomination. Demonstrating broad and deep appeal in a contest that was pivotal for both candidates, Bush's win strongly positioned the Texas governor for the string of elections likely to decide the Republican fight over the next three weeks.
NEWS
March 2, 1996 | MARC LACEY and LOUIS SAHAGUN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
For the first time in many weeks of this improbable Republican presidential nomination battle, Sen. Bob Dole on Friday began to think he might be seeing some breaks in the clouds of gloom that have gathered over his campaign. Fresh polls in some major states showed the onetime and longtime front-runner ahead again. Of course, polls have misled Dole before--they falsely led him to believe that he would win in New Hampshire and Delaware.
NATIONAL
January 18, 2012 | By Michael Finnegan, Maeve Reston and Seema Mehta, Los Angeles Times
Mitt Romney waged a new onslaught against Newt Gingrich on Wednesday amid signs that the former House speaker was gaining traction in his drive to emerge as the sole viable alternative for the Republican presidential nomination. In a rare departure from his usual practice of ignoring GOP rivals and engaging President Obama instead, Romney ridiculed Gingrich for taking credit for millions of jobs created when he served in Congress. "Congressmen taking responsibility or taking credit for helping create jobs is like [former Vice President]
NEWS
January 15, 2012 | By John Hoeffel
On a brisk, bright Sunday morning, with six days to go before South Carolinians vote in their GOP presidential primary, a sampling of church-goers in the Midlands suggests many evangelical Christians remain undecided, making the race highly unsettled. “It's a broad selection and it's difficult. I'm still not committed,” said Wayne Gaul, a 61-year-old physicist, before ducking into the sanctuary at St. Andrews Evangelical Church. Among those who had a preference, Newt Gingrich, the former Georgia congressman and House speaker, was the leading choice.
NATIONAL
July 5, 2011 | By Paul West, Los Angeles Times
Turning a South Carolina rally stage into a dance floor, Michele Bachmann grabbed her husband by the hand the other evening and began jitterbugging to the rockabilly beat of Elvis Presley's "Promised Land. " Bachmann told the friendly crowd outside Ripley's Aquarium in Myrtle Beach that she'll be the Republican candidate against President Obama in 2012 "if South Carolina has anything to say about it. " This state hasn't been wrong yet. Its presidential primary has an unblemished record of picking the eventual GOP nominee, serving as a Southern firewall for national front-runners who've been able to stop insurgent challengers here every time.
NATIONAL
January 21, 2008 | Seema Mehta, Peter Nicholas and Stephen Braun, Times Staff Writers
Racial politics, complaints and the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.'s legacy dominated discourse in the Democratic presidential contest Sunday as Nevada caucus winner Hillary Rodham Clinton and Barack Obama sought to shore up their bases for the South Carolina primary Jan. 26. The new Republican presidential front-runner, John McCain, meanwhile, pivoted from his South Carolina win to Florida's Jan.
NATIONAL
January 19, 2008 | Michael Finnegan, Times Staff Writer
. -- The Confederate flag, abortion and same-sex marriage jumped to the forefront of the Republican presidential race as the candidates scrambled for support in today's South Carolina primary. Whoever takes the campaign's first Southern contest will have much-needed momentum going into Florida's Jan. 29 primary and the coast-to-coast battle Feb. 5. Voters crowned different winners in Iowa, New Hampshire and Michigan this month.
NATIONAL
February 2, 2004 | Scott Martelle, Times Staff Writer
Ask John Edwards, the first-term senator from North Carolina, how he will fare in primaries in Missouri, Oklahoma or four other states up for grabs Tuesday and you won't get an answer. Expectations, he says, are set by others. Ask him how he'll do here in South Carolina, though, and he's unequivocal: "I expect to win," says Edwards, who was born 50 years ago in Seneca, a small mill town tucked into the state's western corner.
NEWS
January 21, 2012 | By Mark Z. Barabak
Newt Gingrich surged to victory Saturday in the South Carolina primary, riding a pair of strong debate performances to overtake Mitt Romney and stop his seemingly relentless march to the GOP nomination. Television networks called the race for the former House speaker almost immediately after the polls closed, a repeat of what happened 11 days ago in New Hampshire, but with a much different result. Former Massachusetts Gov. Romney appeared headed for second place, with former Sen. Rick Santorum  of Pennsylvania and Rep. Ron Paul of Texas trailing well behind.
NEWS
January 15, 2012 | By John Hoeffel
On a brisk, bright Sunday morning, with six days to go before South Carolinians vote in their GOP presidential primary, a sampling of church-goers in the Midlands suggests many evangelical Christians remain undecided, making the race highly unsettled. “It's a broad selection and it's difficult. I'm still not committed,” said Wayne Gaul, a 61-year-old physicist, before ducking into the sanctuary at St. Andrews Evangelical Church. Among those who had a preference, Newt Gingrich, the former Georgia congressman and House speaker, was the leading choice.
NATIONAL
December 11, 2003 | James Rainey, Times Staff Writer
Rep. Richard A. Gephardt picked up a key endorsement Wednesday from Rep. James E. Clyburn of South Carolina, the leading African American politician in a state that will be the first to test the strength of Democratic presidential contenders in the South and among black voters. Clyburn announced in a conference call that he would back his longtime House colleague, saying he chose Gephardt because the Missourian was a "solid thinker and a really compassionate guy ... [who] has always been No.
NEWS
February 20, 2000 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
In an election year supposedly all about character, George W. Bush used a powerful ideological appeal to overwhelm John McCain in Saturday's South Carolina primary and regain the upper hand in the GOP presidential race. By relentlessly challenging McCain's conservative credentials on taxes and campaign finance reform, and attacking him as a Washington insider, Bush amassed huge advantages among Republican and conservative voters.
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