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South Carolina Primary Elections

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NEWS
February 19, 2000 | MATEA GOLD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Racing against time as he tries to jump-start his flagging presidential bid, Bill Bradley has launched a new offensive against Al Gore, portraying the vice president as a flawed candidate who betrays the values of the Democratic Party. Questioning Gore's credentials on campaign finance reform, abortion rights and gun control, Bradley is painting himself as the "real Democrat," better equipped to defeat a Republican in the fall, especially if that Republican is John McCain.
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NEWS
February 19, 2000 | MATEA GOLD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Racing against time as he tries to jump-start his flagging presidential bid, Bill Bradley has launched a new offensive against Al Gore, portraying the vice president as a flawed candidate who betrays the values of the Democratic Party. Questioning Gore's credentials on campaign finance reform, abortion rights and gun control, Bradley is painting himself as the "real Democrat," better equipped to defeat a Republican in the fall, especially if that Republican is John McCain.
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NEWS
February 17, 2000 | JANET WILSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
South Carolina Republicans are being barraged with mail, telephone calls, TV commercials and radio ads in the final days of a close and crucial primary that is likely to set new records for campaign spending. "One side starts spending and the other side has to match it," said Darrell West of Brown University. "It's like two tarantulas in a jar, with apologies to Mr. Bush and Mr. McCain." Most of the advertising is aimed at John McCain. Rival George W.
NEWS
February 17, 2000 | JANET WILSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
South Carolina Republicans are being barraged with mail, telephone calls, TV commercials and radio ads in the final days of a close and crucial primary that is likely to set new records for campaign spending. "One side starts spending and the other side has to match it," said Darrell West of Brown University. "It's like two tarantulas in a jar, with apologies to Mr. Bush and Mr. McCain." Most of the advertising is aimed at John McCain. Rival George W.
NEWS
February 17, 2000 | MARK Z. BARABAK, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
With most polls showing a dead heat, the South Carolina presidential primary is shaping up as a pivotal event in the fight for the Republican nomination. And it's Democrats who could decide it. Like Beth McKiernan, who loves President Clinton and subscribes to the Democratic Party orthodoxy on such issues as abortion and gun control. Still, she plans to cast her ballot Saturday for John McCain, the first Republican to win her vote.
NEWS
February 17, 2000 | MARK Z. BARABAK, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
With most polls showing a dead heat, the South Carolina presidential primary is shaping up as a pivotal event in the fight for the Republican nomination. And it's Democrats who could decide it. Like Beth McKiernan, who loves President Clinton and subscribes to the Democratic Party orthodoxy on such issues as abortion and gun control. Still, she plans to cast her ballot Saturday for John McCain, the first Republican to win her vote.
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