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South Carolina Relief

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September 26, 1989 | LARRY GREEN and PAUL HOUSTON, Times Staff Writers
Cold rain poured on this city Monday like an icy slap to the wounded, splashing through shattered roofs, soaking broken belongings and chilling the homeless. It added new misery to the devastation of Hurricane Hugo--as well as hundreds of thousands of dollars' worth of damage. Charleston Mayor Joseph P. Riley Jr. pleaded on national television for aid ranging from baby formula to bulldozers. He said: "We need everything." Electricity was restored at hospitals.
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NEWS
November 10, 1989 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The first comprehensive report on Hurricane Hugo's assault on South Carolina puts the damage at $4 billion and estimates more than 40,000 people will need counseling. The 2-inch-thick report produced by the state Budget and Control Board gives a picture of the state through Oct. 27, five weeks after Hugo blew ashore. It covers preliminary damage assessments and relief efforts from 25 agencies. The report also said that the Federal Emergency Management Agency expects to spend $149.
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NEWS
October 9, 1989
South Carolina Gov. Carroll A. Campbell Jr. called on churches nationwide to join his "adopt-a-family" program to aid those still suffering from the impact of Hurricane Hugo. "We'll be back," he said. "With the spirit now in this state, with the help of America and with the help of God, we'll rebuild and we'll re-establish and we will endure."
NEWS
October 9, 1989
South Carolina Gov. Carroll A. Campbell Jr. called on churches nationwide to join his "adopt-a-family" program to aid those still suffering from the impact of Hurricane Hugo. "We'll be back," he said. "With the spirit now in this state, with the help of America and with the help of God, we'll rebuild and we'll re-establish and we will endure."
NEWS
September 29, 1989 | From Associated Press
Congress on Thursday approved $1.1 billion in emergency aid for the victims of Hurricane Hugo, Capitol Hill's largest disaster-relief package ever. The White House announced that President Bush will sign the legislation, perhaps when he visits South Carolina today. "There never was this much money," said Bill McAda, a spokesman for the Federal Emergency Management Agency. "But this also may well be the most damaging one (hurricane) in history."
NEWS
November 10, 1989 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The first comprehensive report on Hurricane Hugo's assault on South Carolina puts the damage at $4 billion and estimates more than 40,000 people will need counseling. The 2-inch-thick report produced by the state Budget and Control Board gives a picture of the state through Oct. 27, five weeks after Hugo blew ashore. It covers preliminary damage assessments and relief efforts from 25 agencies. The report also said that the Federal Emergency Management Agency expects to spend $149.
NEWS
October 7, 1989 | From Associated Press
The federal government has agreed to shoulder a greater-than-normal share of the financial burden for damage caused by Hurricane Hugo in South Carolina, the White House announced Friday. The federal government will pay 75% of all eligible costs up to $34 million, and above that amount it will pay all costs.
NEWS
September 26, 1989 | MICHAEL J. YBARRA and KEVIN DAVIS, Times Staff Writers
Frustrated that desperately needed generators were sitting at an Army base three hours away while 75,000 residents in Charleston were without power, Sen. Ernest F. Hollings called the White House shortly before midnight on Sunday to demand more speedy help for South Carolina. White House Chief of Staff John H. Sununu promised to cut through the red tape, and late Monday the Democratic senator's aides were optimistic that the equipment would soon reach the suffering historic port town.
NEWS
September 27, 1989 | J. MICHAEL KENNEDY, Times Staff Writer
For three days, Robert Jones labored with his chain saw, cutting a path through the fallen trees to the main road after Hurricane Hugo hit. He never thought this could happen, not here, not 100 miles inland from the perils of the vulnerable coast. Yet when he looked out at first light the morning after Hugo raged ashore, there was not a tree standing on his land, where the day before there had been 500. "I prayed for my family and I prayed for my house.
NEWS
September 26, 1989 | JAMES RISEN, Times Staff Writer
Two of America's richest people--along with some of the nation's biggest corporations--pitched in to help the relief effort in Charleston, S.C., in the wake of Hurricane Hugo, local officials said Monday. Grateful local leaders said the private sector aid has been crucial in a battered city that remains without power long after Hugo's passing.
NEWS
October 7, 1989 | From Associated Press
The federal government has agreed to shoulder a greater-than-normal share of the financial burden for damage caused by Hurricane Hugo in South Carolina, the White House announced Friday. The federal government will pay 75% of all eligible costs up to $34 million, and above that amount it will pay all costs.
NEWS
September 29, 1989 | From Associated Press
Congress on Thursday approved $1.1 billion in emergency aid for the victims of Hurricane Hugo, Capitol Hill's largest disaster-relief package ever. The White House announced that President Bush will sign the legislation, perhaps when he visits South Carolina today. "There never was this much money," said Bill McAda, a spokesman for the Federal Emergency Management Agency. "But this also may well be the most damaging one (hurricane) in history."
NEWS
September 27, 1989 | J. MICHAEL KENNEDY, Times Staff Writer
For three days, Robert Jones labored with his chain saw, cutting a path through the fallen trees to the main road after Hurricane Hugo hit. He never thought this could happen, not here, not 100 miles inland from the perils of the vulnerable coast. Yet when he looked out at first light the morning after Hugo raged ashore, there was not a tree standing on his land, where the day before there had been 500. "I prayed for my family and I prayed for my house.
NEWS
September 26, 1989 | MICHAEL J. YBARRA and KEVIN DAVIS, Times Staff Writers
Frustrated that desperately needed generators were sitting at an Army base three hours away while 75,000 residents in Charleston were without power, Sen. Ernest F. Hollings called the White House shortly before midnight on Sunday to demand more speedy help for South Carolina. White House Chief of Staff John H. Sununu promised to cut through the red tape, and late Monday the Democratic senator's aides were optimistic that the equipment would soon reach the suffering historic port town.
NEWS
September 26, 1989 | JAMES RISEN, Times Staff Writer
Two of America's richest people--along with some of the nation's biggest corporations--pitched in to help the relief effort in Charleston, S.C., in the wake of Hurricane Hugo, local officials said Monday. Grateful local leaders said the private sector aid has been crucial in a battered city that remains without power long after Hugo's passing.
NEWS
September 26, 1989 | LARRY GREEN and PAUL HOUSTON, Times Staff Writers
Cold rain poured on this city Monday like an icy slap to the wounded, splashing through shattered roofs, soaking broken belongings and chilling the homeless. It added new misery to the devastation of Hurricane Hugo--as well as hundreds of thousands of dollars' worth of damage. Charleston Mayor Joseph P. Riley Jr. pleaded on national television for aid ranging from baby formula to bulldozers. He said: "We need everything." Electricity was restored at hospitals.
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