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ENTERTAINMENT
May 22, 1993
I am perplexed by Rick Du Brow's insistence that the pilot Michael Weithorn and I wrote for CBS, "South Central"--which presents an honest portrayal of African-American life--is somehow exploitative because it puts a name on the place and a face on the people who live there ("Letter Campaigns Fail to Save Shows," May 18). And what is downright unsettling is Du Brow's suggested solution that we simply switch our locale to a "generic, unnamed urban setting." I disagree. (Although I find the thought interesting.
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OPINION
August 14, 2013 | Patt Morrison
It's not a typo: The South Central L.A. Tea Party exists, and Jesse Lee Peterson takes a bow for founding it. He's also president and founder of the 23-year-old black bootstraps group Brotherhood Organization of a New Destiny, or BOND, and serves as pastor for a nondenominational congregation at its headquarters. As his public pronouncements make clear, he detests Planned Parenthood and legal abortion, welfare and the California-born black holiday Kwanzaa. He used to hold a "national day of repudiation" against Jesse Jackson; he has his doubts about women in high places.
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OPINION
January 21, 1996
One of the awful consequences of Los Angeles' 1992 riots is that in many minds it solidified the reputation of South-Central Los Angeles as a place to flee or avoid, not a place to go to or invest in. While it is certainly true that South-Central has some of the very serious problems that affect most other American inner cities, it also has a positive face that isn't well-known or appreciated.
NATIONAL
August 6, 2013 | By Evan Halper
WASHINGTON - Gov. Jerry Brown has shown mastery of Sacramento, but his hope for a legacy of enduring public works hinges on a different skill - the ability to work Washington. Brown has staked much on a $24-billion plan to resolve California's decades-long fight over moving water from the north, where most of the state's rain and snow falls, to thirsty cities and farms in the south and the Central Valley. Winning would break a stalemate that has bedeviled the state for more than a generation and reverse one of the biggest defeats Brown suffered decades ago during his previous stint as governor.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 1994
Concerning "What Ever Happened to Equal Access for All?" by Robin Y. Deane (May 9): I really enjoy Fox Television's "South Central." In my 26 years of living in South-Central Los Angeles, I have encountered all kinds of personalities, including those of the characters on the show. The truth is that some of us in our slang do use the "N" word. If you are a young black male, growing up here, your life is in peril due to gang violence, the police and drugs. There are many strong black women who, after being laid off, have had to turn to welfare to feed their families.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 30, 1994
Anyone who is connected with "South Central," the new television show that purportedly reflects "true lifestyles" of African Americans residing in South-Central Los Angeles, should hang his head in shame. In actuality, what we are asked to digest are the same old stale servings of stereotypes and sensationalism. Of course, the mother is the head of the household, and the father's whereabouts are unknown. Naturally, the mother finds it difficult to support the family and is a potential candidate for welfare.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 1994 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
"Nothing gets me going like the smell of gunpowder in the morning," young Tasha Mosley tells her mother after a pre-breakfast walk through their Crenshaw District neighborhood. And nothing on television quite gets going like "South Central," the bracing, heroically good half-hour series premiering Tuesday night on Fox.
NEWS
May 15, 1994
The South Central Community Center will celebrate its first anniversary by sponsoring a free health and education fair Friday. Free blood-pressure screenings and eye, ear and breast cancer exams will be offered from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the center, 7522 S. Vermont Ave. In addition, the center will hold an employment workshop.
OPINION
September 22, 2004
Re "Troops for L.A. War Zones," editorial, Sept. 16: I support putting more police into South-Central and other parts of Los Angeles, but I have two points of contention with the editorial supporting greater taxation to pay for more cops. First, police are not "troops" to occupy a South-Central "war zone." These are our youth, not the legions of Al Qaeda we're talking about. We need police on foot, on bikes and in substations protecting our communities by developing the kinds of relationships that help with crime prevention as well as investigation, apprehension and incarceration.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 18, 1994 | Compiled for The Times by Trin Yarborough
JOHN SISKA Echo Park I work four to five days each week doing typesetting and desktop publishing for a union printing company in South-Central, and I've never had any problem. Traveling to my job from Echo Park you can see the extreme segregation that exists in Los Angeles.
NEWS
August 1, 2013 | By Patt Morrison
When Brenda Stevenson came to UCLA to teach, after studying at Yale and working at the University of Texas, Austin, she thought she knew from multicultural. But L.A. had a vast and distinctly complex ethnic weft and warp that she hadn't anticipated; she explores two threads, the Korean and African American ones, in her new book about the 1991 killing of a black teenager, “The Contested Murder of Latasha Harlins.” I spoke to her about it for my “Patt Morrison Asks” column.
NEWS
June 26, 2013 | By Russ Parsons
Barbecue - and by that I mean real barbecue, meat cooked long and slow near (not over) a smoldering fire, until it is tender enough to fall to pieces but still moist enough to be delicious - is a discursive art. It takes as much time as it takes, and things will happen, some of them planned, and there will be ample opportunity in between for conversation, music and philosophy. The current rage for commodifying barbecue - turning it into a series of 10-best lists and must-visit places - is useful for the consumer, but only in the short term.
NEWS
March 19, 2013 | By Caitlin Keller
If you haven't already watched renegade gardener Ron Finley' s TEDTalk, given at last month's TEDActive  conference in Palm Springs, do yourself a favor, Angeleno, and check out this video .  (The video has some salty language in it.)  The Los Angeles artist has taken up urban gardening in hopes of making changes to South-Central L.A.'s food system by transforming food deserts, where "the drive-throughs are killing more people than the drive-bys," into food forests. And, no, he doesn't just want to talk about making changes, as you'll come to understand during his talk.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 20, 2012 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
From the first tires-squealing, sirens-blaring, guns-blazing car chase to the last quiet conversation, "End of Watch" is a visceral story of beat cops that is rare in its sensitivity, rash in its violence and raw in its humor. For David Ayer, who has long made the minefield of police work his metier, this blood-drenched and unexpectedly moving film is his best cut yet on what life is like on that thin blue line. Jake Gyllenhaal and Michael Peña star as partners fighting crime on the streets of South-Central Los Angeles.
OPINION
June 27, 2012 | Patt Morrison
You can take Walter Mosley out of Los Angeles - in fact, Mosley did so himself, moving to New York decades ago - but you can't take L.A. out of Walter Mosley. The master of several genres keeps the city present, from his Easy Rawlins detective novels set in black postwar Los Angeles to the Greek-myths-in-South-Central elements in one of the two novellas in his latest volume. Mosley appeared to wrap it up with Rawlins in "Blonde Faith" in 2007, but five years later, he's found more for his most famous detective to do, just as Mosley has for himself.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 19, 2012 | By Richard Verrier
Writer-director Ava DuVernay stands outside a well-maintained Spanish mission-style duplex in South-Central Los Angeles, home to the heroine of her story, a hardworking nurse who works the night shift and struggles to maintain a relationship with a husband serving a prison sentence. “When people think South-Central or Compton, it's all 'Boyz n the Hood,"' said DuVernay, referring to the 1991 saga directed by John Singleton. “It's never a house like this. It becomes an assumption that people who live in these communities don't care about their home, don't work as hard for them and don't own their homes.
OPINION
November 30, 2002
Bravo for Marcy De Veaux's critique of the media's egregious misuse of the term "South-Central" (Voices, Nov. 23). The site of the tragic murder of Merlin Santana is in the Crenshaw district, near the predominantly black community of Leimert Park, a formerly white enclave that was deemed to be within the boundaries of the Westside when racially restrictive covenants prohibited blacks from residing there up until the 1950s. It wasn't until whites began moving out of areas like Leimert Park en masse in the 1960s that the boundaries of South-Central began miraculously expanding farther westward and the designation became cultural shorthand for any predominantly black (and presumably less desirable)
NEWS
October 16, 1994 | ENRIQUE LAVIN
Her name signified love and giving to the communities she served. Now a community center has been named in memory of the Rev. Blanche Thomas, an 81-year-old minister who was found slain in her South La Brea Avenue home in July. The 3R Outreach, a 4-year-old nonprofit organization based in South-Central, last week dubbed the newest addition to its programs for the homeless after Thomas, who had worked closely with the 3R program.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 19, 2011 | Hector Tobar
When Gary Phillips returns to his old South L.A. neighborhood, it's with an old movie playing in his head. The soundtrack is Sly and the Family Stone, and Funkadelic. The cast includes lots of African American kids like him, in 1960s and '70s hairstyles, with Phillips riding a Stingray bike his "pop" bought for him over at the nearby Sears. He pedals over to South Broadway and the local store, Whitehead's, which is run by a white man with white hair named Whitehead. "He hired local kids to work behind the counter and was a really cool cat," Phillips told me. All this was 40 years ago. It goes without saying that the South-Central of old is only a memory now. Phillips, a detective writer and community activist, moved out in 1987.
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