Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSouth Central Los Angeles Development And Redevelopment
IN THE NEWS

South Central Los Angeles Development And Redevelopment

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
February 26, 1995 | STEPHEN GREGORY
In the heyday of Central Avenue, a Friday night visit to one of the thoroughfare's renowned jazz clubs often meant a tight squeeze among a crush of patrons, especially if Duke Ellington was playing. "Man, they'd get crowded," recalled 70-year-old Corney White, a retired metal crafter who remembers the main attractions of the once-bustling business and entertainment district, considered the heart of the city's black community in the 1940s. "If you came to L.A.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 21, 2000 | GEORGE RAMOS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Back in the 1960s, when a redevelopment plan was used to reshape the neighborhoods near USC and allow for expansion of its campus, some opponents called the plan a land grab that was aimed at "Negro removal--not urban renewal." The remark still makes some associated with the university wince because it evokes a time when USC was seen as an elite enclave for rich kids in South-Central Los Angeles.
Advertisement
NEWS
November 15, 1992 | ELSTON CARR
Later this month the Los Angeles Child Guidance Clinic will begin construction of a facility to replace its offices at 746 W. Adams Blvd., clinic officials said. Funded by $9 million in private donations, the new 40,000-square-foot building on Vermont Avenue near Exposition Boulevard will allow the 68-year-old clinic to expand its outpatient mental health services by 50%, said Elizabeth W. Pfromm, the clinic's executive director.
BUSINESS
July 20, 1999 | JESUS SANCHEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A group that includes professional football player Keyshawn Johnson will unveil today plans to build a $53-million shopping center in South-Central Los Angeles, an area that has long struggled to attract new real estate and retail development. Chesterfield Square, a 23-acre project at the southwest corner of Western Avenue and Slauson Boulevard, would be one of the largest retail developments built in the area in more than a decade.
NEWS
July 4, 1993 | LEE HARRIS
After nearly nine years of frustrating delays, residents were encouraged this week when the city Community Redevelopment Agency gave approval to Food 4 Less Supermarkets Inc. and Bakewell Development to build an Alpha Beta supermarket at Adams Boulevard and Vermont Avenue. "Despite all that has gone on, the bottom line is: The community is finally going to get a market," said Mike Thomson, chairman of the Hoover Project Area Committee, a watchdog group that monitors the agency in the community.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 26, 1996
Singing "We Shall Overcome" and clasping hands to form a giant circle, more than 100 community and church members celebrated Thursday the dedication of a soon-to-be-opened senior housing complex on West 85th Street in South Los Angeles, one of the hardest-hit areas in the 1992 riots. "There is something good that can come out of South-Central Los Angeles," said Rev. Edward Howard. "We had a vision, and the Bible said without a vision, we will perish."
NEWS
November 8, 1992 | PATRICK LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After the spring fires died out in South-Central Los Angeles, hope surged that a stream of investment money would finally begin to flow into the inner city to nurture a renaissance of businesses and jobs. Indeed, it seemed as if news conferences were being held weekly by groups of well-tailored executives, black and white, announcing the creation of this fund or that program to come up with millions of dollars in new capital.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 24, 1990 | FRANK CLIFFORD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A task force appointed by Mayor Tom Bradley announced Friday a broad set of proposals for revitalizing South-Central Los Angeles, a distressed area that City Hall has been criticized for neglecting over the years. The task force was created last July to, in Bradley's words, "resurrect South-Central from the grasp of drug peddlers and gang members." In general, the task force's report deals with ways to increase housing and jobs as well as business and educational opportunities.
NEWS
July 5, 1992 | MILES CORWIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In much of suburban Southern California, outside the areas where stores were being burned and looted, many residents repeatedly asked a single question: Why are people destroying their own communities? But this was no mystery to those in the inner city, and Ivon Allen, who has lived in South-Central Los Angeles for more than 40 years, responded with a brief answer: "Many of us don't feel like it's our community anymore."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 11, 1994 | J. MICHAEL KENNEDY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Until two weeks ago, the construction of a new $45-million Museum of Science and Industry in Los Angeles seemed an absolute certainty. But that was before the war between North and South broke out in the state Legislature. That was before questions were raised about why money earmarked for earthquake repairs after Northern California's Loma Prieta quake was being used to build a new structure.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 25, 1996
City officials and community leaders broke ground Thursday for a controversial $15-million development project that will be constructed at 81st Street and Vermont Avenue in South-Central Los Angeles. The development is funded by Wells Fargo Bank and federal subsidies, officials said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 26, 1996
Singing "We Shall Overcome" and clasping hands to form a giant circle, more than 100 community and church members celebrated Thursday the dedication of a soon-to-be-opened senior housing complex on West 85th Street in South Los Angeles, one of the hardest-hit areas in the 1992 riots. "There is something good that can come out of South-Central Los Angeles," said Rev. Edward Howard. "We had a vision, and the Bible said without a vision, we will perish."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 28, 1996
South-Central Los Angeles residents broke ground Wednesday for a supermarket at Western Avenue and 88th Street on a site where another market burned down in the 1992 riots. The new Superior Super Warehouse, part of a small chain of supermarkets, is scheduled to open in late 1997 and will provide 150 jobs in the community, said Calvin Naito, spokesman for Councilman Mark Ridley-Thomas.
NEWS
April 9, 1995
Construction has begun on a supermarket at a Manchester Boulevard site left vacant by the 1992 riots. Los Angeles City Councilman Mark Ridley-Thomas and Mike Shalabi, president of the R Ranch community market chain, were on hand at the ground breaking last week for the new store at 310 Manchester Blvd. The market will fill a demand in Ridley-Thomas' 8th District, which has been identified as having half the number of grocery stores per capita than the rest of the city overall.
NEWS
February 26, 1995 | STEPHEN GREGORY
In the heyday of Central Avenue, a Friday night visit to one of the thoroughfare's renowned jazz clubs often meant a tight squeeze among a crush of patrons, especially if Duke Ellington was playing. "Man, they'd get crowded," recalled 70-year-old Corney White, a retired metal crafter who remembers the main attractions of the once-bustling business and entertainment district, considered the heart of the city's black community in the 1940s. "If you came to L.A.
NEWS
February 12, 1995 | STEPHEN GREGORY
A little-used stretch of tracks threatens to derail plans for a shopping complex that area residents hope will bring much-needed services and jobs. "There's no major shopping center east of the Harbor Freeway; we need this (project)," community activist Juanita Tate said of the proposed project at Slauson and Central avenues. Tate, executive director of Concerned Citizens of South-Central Los Angeles, said the $12.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 15, 1993 | FRANK CLIFFORD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mark Ridley-Thomas, one of the City Council's most influential members, endorsed council colleague Michael Woo for mayor Sunday, a move that could go a long way to solidify the African-American support that Woo sees as crucial to his election hopes. But as Ridley-Thomas said Sunday with Woo standing at his side, his endorsement did not come cheaply.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 28, 1996
South-Central Los Angeles residents broke ground Wednesday for a supermarket at Western Avenue and 88th Street on a site where another market burned down in the 1992 riots. The new Superior Super Warehouse, part of a small chain of supermarkets, is scheduled to open in late 1997 and will provide 150 jobs in the community, said Calvin Naito, spokesman for Councilman Mark Ridley-Thomas.
NEWS
October 2, 1994 | ENRIQUE LAVIN
With pomp and pageantry, the African American Unity Center recently celebrated the groundbreaking for an arts center on a site where an earthquake-damaged church now stands. Setting the groove with Marvin Gaye's "I Heard It Through the Grapevine," the Washington High School band marked the Sept. 22 ceremony by marching across 53rd Street to the south corner of Vermont Avenue, where the Unity Center's performing arts center is scheduled to open its doors in 1996.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 20, 1994 | DIANE HAITHMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Motown founder Berry Gordy, Mann Theatres, the Federal Emergency Management Agency and several other public and private donors have given $3 million to the African American Unity Center to help turn a quake-damaged church into a community arts center, officials said Monday.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|