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South Central Los Angeles Economy

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NEWS
May 12, 1995 | JOHN L. MITCHELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A few days a month, Tanya Jackson's cash-strapped neighborhood near the Harbor Freeway experiences a brief but profound economic resurgence. Long lines form at supermarkets and banks. Stores, now stocked high with extra merchandise, hire additional help to handle the rush. Check-cashing businesses turn a huge profit. Street vendors, sensing the upsurge, hawk everything from leather belts to cotton candy.
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NEWS
August 20, 2000 | LEE ROMNEY and STUART SILVERSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
At an intersection near downtown Compton that only three years ago was marked by vacant lots and prostitutes, the beginnings of a comeback have emerged. Today the corner of Wilmington Avenue and Compton Boulevard is home to a 37-unit condominium complex with a community center and playground. Twenty-eight single-family homes will soon rise from a litter-strewn parcel around the corner. An AutoZone store sprouted last summer.
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BUSINESS
September 8, 1993 | CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Comptroller of the Currency Eugene A. Ludwig, who is among the nation's most important banking regulators, said he was "appalled" at the scarcity of bank branches in South-Central Los Angeles and promised that the Clinton Administration will push for a mixture of incentives and enforcement measures to ensure the number increases.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 6, 1996 | MAKI BECKER
About 180 senior Southland banking officials were loaded onto gleaming white buses Thursday for a grand tour of a part of town that was unfamiliar to many of them: South-Central Los Angeles. The purpose was to show officials of mid-size lending institutions the potential for investment in inner-city neighborhoods by taking them there.
NEWS
August 20, 2000 | LEE ROMNEY and STUART SILVERSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
At an intersection near downtown Compton that only three years ago was marked by vacant lots and prostitutes, the beginnings of a comeback have emerged. Today the corner of Wilmington Avenue and Compton Boulevard is home to a 37-unit condominium complex with a community center and playground. Twenty-eight single-family homes will soon rise from a litter-strewn parcel around the corner. An AutoZone store sprouted last summer.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 9, 1994 | ERIN J. AUBRY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Like tourists headed out for a turnaround trip to Las Vegas, four busloads of bankers and executives sallied forth Wednesday for a look at that place they had heard so much about: South-Central Los Angeles and beyond. But in this city where it is possible to drive the freeways for a lifetime and never set foot in the neighborhoods whizzing by, this was not exactly the inner city the captains of corporate Los Angeles had been led to expect.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 6, 1996 | MAKI BECKER
About 180 senior Southland banking officials were loaded onto gleaming white buses Thursday for a grand tour of a part of town that was unfamiliar to many of them: South-Central Los Angeles. The purpose was to show officials of mid-size lending institutions the potential for investment in inner-city neighborhoods by taking them there.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 27, 1993 | PAUL FELDMAN
The chain-link fence at the corner of Florence and Normandie avenues guards an empty lot that housed an auto radiator business set ablaze during the 1992 riots. Behind the steel links, weeds now sprout. On the fence itself, other signs of life abound. Business signs, to be precise.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 15, 1995
Trying to undo the damage of the 1992 riots and a failing neighborhood economy, residents armed with federal dollars will give a 16-block stretch of Vermont Avenue in South-Central Los Angeles a $150,000 face lift. The project, part of the federally funded Los Angeles Neighborhood Initiative program, proposes to transform the mile-long commercial corridor in the Vermont Square neighborhood into an inviting promenade for shoppers and residents by the end of the year.
NEWS
June 11, 1993 | SONIA NAZARIO, TIMES URBAN AFFAIRS WRITER
A yearlong UCLA study on hunger in inner cities found that 27% of residents in one South-Central Los Angeles neighborhood said they do not have enough money to buy food, and that their families go hungry an average of five days each month.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 15, 1995
Trying to undo the damage of the 1992 riots and a failing neighborhood economy, residents armed with federal dollars will give a 16-block stretch of Vermont Avenue in South-Central Los Angeles a $150,000 face lift. The project, part of the federally funded Los Angeles Neighborhood Initiative program, proposes to transform the mile-long commercial corridor in the Vermont Square neighborhood into an inviting promenade for shoppers and residents by the end of the year.
NEWS
May 12, 1995 | JOHN L. MITCHELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A few days a month, Tanya Jackson's cash-strapped neighborhood near the Harbor Freeway experiences a brief but profound economic resurgence. Long lines form at supermarkets and banks. Stores, now stocked high with extra merchandise, hire additional help to handle the rush. Check-cashing businesses turn a huge profit. Street vendors, sensing the upsurge, hawk everything from leather belts to cotton candy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 9, 1994 | ERIN J. AUBRY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Like tourists headed out for a turnaround trip to Las Vegas, four busloads of bankers and executives sallied forth Wednesday for a look at that place they had heard so much about: South-Central Los Angeles and beyond. But in this city where it is possible to drive the freeways for a lifetime and never set foot in the neighborhoods whizzing by, this was not exactly the inner city the captains of corporate Los Angeles had been led to expect.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 27, 1993 | PAUL FELDMAN
The chain-link fence at the corner of Florence and Normandie avenues guards an empty lot that housed an auto radiator business set ablaze during the 1992 riots. Behind the steel links, weeds now sprout. On the fence itself, other signs of life abound. Business signs, to be precise.
BUSINESS
September 8, 1993 | CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Comptroller of the Currency Eugene A. Ludwig, who is among the nation's most important banking regulators, said he was "appalled" at the scarcity of bank branches in South-Central Los Angeles and promised that the Clinton Administration will push for a mixture of incentives and enforcement measures to ensure the number increases.
NEWS
June 11, 1993 | SONIA NAZARIO, TIMES URBAN AFFAIRS WRITER
A yearlong UCLA study on hunger in inner cities found that 27% of residents in one South-Central Los Angeles neighborhood said they do not have enough money to buy food, and that their families go hungry an average of five days each month.
NEWS
May 3, 1992 | ANDREA FORD and LISA R. OMPHROY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Sinbad the comedian gently and carefully broke the news Friday afternoon to the scores of people amid the sea of blue cots in the basement of First African Methodist Episcopal Church. "I know this is going to scare some of you but we are going to have to pack you all up and move you to Dorsey High School," he said into the microphone at the front of the room. "Nobody is abandoning you. Nobody is forsaking you."
NEWS
May 3, 1992 | ANDREA FORD and LISA R. OMPHROY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Sinbad the comedian gently and carefully broke the news Friday afternoon to the scores of people amid the sea of blue cots in the basement of First African Methodist Episcopal Church. "I know this is going to scare some of you but we are going to have to pack you all up and move you to Dorsey High School," he said into the microphone at the front of the room. "Nobody is abandoning you. Nobody is forsaking you."
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