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South Central Los Angeles Housing

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 3, 1997
Ground was broken Thursday in separate ceremonies on two South-Central Los Angeles housing developments for low- to moderate-income residents. The $6.5-million West "A" Homes, developed by the West Angeles Community Development Corp., will consist of 44 townhomes and apartments at 41st Street and Vermont Avenue, said officials of the West Angeles Church of God in Christ. Residents also will have access to on-site job training and child care.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 3, 1997
Ground was broken Thursday in separate ceremonies on two South-Central Los Angeles housing developments for low- to moderate-income residents. The $6.5-million West "A" Homes, developed by the West Angeles Community Development Corp., will consist of 44 townhomes and apartments at 41st Street and Vermont Avenue, said officials of the West Angeles Church of God in Christ. Residents also will have access to on-site job training and child care.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 5, 1997
What would Christmas be without snow? About 20 children from Nickerson Gardens, a South-Central Los Angeles housing development, discovered the joy of playing in the white stuff when they were treated Thursday to an afternoon of snowball fights and sledding at Loyola Marymount University in Westchester. Members of Sigma Pi fraternity brought in 20 tons of snow, which was spread over hay bales to create hills and slopes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 31, 1995
The first resident-managed community center in a South-Central Los Angeles housing project is now open. The Jordan Downs Multipurpose Community Center, in the Jordan Downs project in Watts, is run by a residents' group, the Resident Management Council. City Housing Authority officials say the resident-managed center is one solution to the local jobs shortage. The center not only employs people who live within the project but also provides a facility for job training.
NEWS
December 25, 1989
Paramedics and police were showered with rocks and bottles early Sunday when they tried to investigate the shooting death of a 25-year-old man in a South-Central Los Angeles public housing project, authorities said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 23, 1985 | STEPHANIE CHAVEZ, Times Staff Writer
Ten more officers have been assigned to the Los Angeles Police Department's Devonshire Division to round out a 12-officer task force that in about two weeks will begin patrolling the crime-ridden Bryant Street-Vanalden Avenue neighborhood of Northridge, police said. The task force will put an even more visible police presence in the area than they did in last weekend's drug crackdown, when 91 arrests were made in the three-block neighborhood, Capt. Mark D. Stevens said this week.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 14, 1988 | STEPHANIE CHAVEZ, Times Staff Writer
A gun battle between Cambodian men and black gang members at a South-Central Los Angeles housing project is being called "an isolated act" of violence between two groups of angry men, police said Friday. "There is nothing that leads us to believe that this was a racial or ethnic disturbance," said Capt. Robert Riley. "It was two groups of people who got mad at each other."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 13, 1988 | NIESON HIMMEL, Times Staff Writer
Two men were wounded during a protracted gun battle between black gang members and some Cambodian men at a South-Central Los Angeles housing project, police reported Thursday. Officers seized two high-powered rifles and three handguns and arrested two Cambodian men after the gunfight, which began late Wednesday night.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 28, 1990
Abandoned houses are becoming a nuisance in Los Angeles. Homeless men break into the empty houses and turn them into dirty havens for squatters. Street gangs misuse the dilapidated houses as headquarters for crime. Crack dealers and dope users make themselves at home in these eyesores. But while these houses are typically in very bad shape, many are worth salvaging. A new city program aims to save the houses, and also help some low-income families become homeowners.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 17, 1989 | Tim Waters and Adrianne Goodman
Karen Reed has lived in the Harbor Hills Housing Project in Lomita for 22 years, raised two daughters there, is close friends with her neighbors and has never worried about gangs or crime. "We sit out here and talk to our neighbors at night, our kids play in the streets," Reed said last week as she stood outside her apartment. "You just don't do that in infested areas."
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