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November 7, 1993 | ERIN J. AUBRY and VICKI TORRES, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Helping douse some of the Southland's worst conflagrations in years, the newly formed South Central Panthers have been baptized by fire--literally. "It's been an adventure," Maurice White, 24, said recently as he helped dig a firebreak, sweating profusely in thick khaki pants and shirt. To combat the intense heat, his face was heavily swathed in a veil, breathing mask and bandanna.
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NEWS
November 7, 1993 | ERIN J. AUBRY and VICKI TORRES, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Helping douse some of the Southland's worst conflagrations in years, the newly formed South Central Panthers have been baptized by fire--literally. "It's been an adventure," Maurice White, 24, said recently as he helped dig a firebreak, sweating profusely in thick khaki pants and shirt. To combat the intense heat, his face was heavily swathed in a veil, breathing mask and bandanna.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 27, 1994 | ERIN J. AUBRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Maurice White, an original member of the South-Central Panthers firefighting team, died earlier this month from gunshot wounds inflicted during a party in South-Central Los Angeles. He was 25. Newton Division police said White was shot March 5 when a fight broke out at a house party on East 22nd Street. It was unclear if White was directly involved in the dispute.
NEWS
October 10, 1993 | ERIN J. AUBRY
The South Central Panthers, the on-call firefighting unit largely made up of former rival gang members, has finally gotten its feet wet. Wet feet were actually the least of it. Over the last two weeks, the Panthers have helped drench more than 42,000 acres of burning brush and forest near Lake Cachuma in the Los Padres National Forest, about 30 miles north of Santa Barbara. Although most of the 37 Panthers have had firefighting experience since training with the U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 5, 1993 | ERIN J. AUBRY
They may have been tired, but no one was talking of heading back home. Made up primarily of former gang members, the South-Central Panthers--an on-call firefighting unit used by the U.S. Forest Service--are no strangers to danger. But the perils once faced on the streets by the crew's 37 members pale in comparison to the situations some of them encountered in the last two weeks. Nature, the Panthers found, can be a more formidable force than any rival gang. Since Oct.
NEWS
March 20, 1994 | ERIN J. AUBRY
Maurice White, an original member of the South-Central Panthers firefighting team, died March 5 from gunshot wounds inflicted during a party in South-Central Los Angeles. He was 25. Newton Division police said White was shot when a fight broke out at a house party on East 22nd Street. It was unclear if White was directly involved in the dispute. No arrests had been made as of Friday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 10, 1995 | EFRAIN HERNANDEZ JR., TIMES STAFF WRITER
Maurice Malone was confident that Los Angeles gang rivalries would not get in the way as blacks and Latinos trained together to fight wildfires in the mountains far from home. "We leave that in the city," said Malone, 24, a gang member who is a crew leader for the South Central Panthers, an on-call firefighting unit for the U.S. Forest Service. "We're not going to take the fire to the city, so why are we going to bring the city (violence) here?"
NEWS
October 23, 1994 | ERIN J. AUBRY
The South Central Panthers, who forged a name for themselves by setting aside gang conflicts to fight fires in Malibu and elsewhere, have lost a second member to the kind of street violence the group so often deplored. Virgil Blandson, 23, was gunned down Oct. 11 in South-Central Los Angeles during a quarrel with a man who apparently owed him money, police said.
NEWS
November 27, 1994 | EFRAIN HERNANDEZ JR., TIMES STAFF WRITER
To Danny Cortez, the East Los Angeles Aztecs firefighting crew has been a lifesaver in more ways than one. The crew, a new on-call unit working for the U.S. Forest Service, spent up to three weeks away from home at a time fighting fires during the past several months. Being away meant helping save forests, homes and the lives of strangers, but it also kept crew members off the violent streets most of them know too well. "I grew up in the neighborhood.
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