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BUSINESS
September 4, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Murdoch to Sell Hong Kong Newspaper: International media tycoon Rupert Murdoch is negotiating to sell the profitable South China Morning Post, a Post statement said. The move to cut his print media ties in the British colony came just a month after he bought Hong Kong-based satellite broadcaster STAR TV. The statement said Murdoch's News Corp. Ltd. is involved in talks with a third party concerning the sale of South China Morning Post (Holdings) Ltd.
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WORLD
February 26, 2014 | By Julie Makinen, This post has been updated. See the note below for details
BEIJING -- A recently dismissed Hong Kong newspaper editor was hospitalized in critical condition Wednesday after assailants wounded him in the back and leg and fled on a motorbike. The assault on Kevin Lau , whose removal as editor of the Ming Pao daily last month helped spark demonstrations over erosion of media freedoms, shocked a wide swath of the former British territory, which reverted to Chinese rule in 1997. Under an arrangement known as “one country, two systems,” Hong Kong is supposed to enjoy greater freedom of speech and the press, along with other liberties, than the mainland.
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BUSINESS
September 13, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Murdoch to Sell Media Stake to Malaysian Tycoon: Media baron Rupert Murdoch plans to sell almost 35% of Hong Kong's South China Morning Post group to Robert Kuok, a Malaysian billionaire who has close relations with the Colony's future rulers in China, the daily said early today. Ending a week of wild rumors, the South China Morning Post said Kuok had agreed to pay Murdoch's News Corp. $349 million for the 34.9% stake. After the deal is completed, Murdoch will still have 15.
NEWS
February 14, 2014 | By Scott Martelle
Now this is spite raised to an art form. As long as my colleagues are posting unconventional love-related stories on Valentine's Day, this one might as well get some play too: A Shanghai man whose romance dissolved last year decided to spread the misery by leading a campaign to buy up every other seat for a Valentine's Day showing of the movie, “Beijing Love Story.” The man crowd-sourced the effort, and other presumably jilted...
NEWS
June 30, 1989 | From Times wire service s
Administrators in Hong Kong have urged Britain's Prince and Princess of Wales not to make a planned visit to the colony in November because of growing anti-British sentiment, the South China Morning Post reported today. Government officials refused comment on the report but diplomatic sources said they understood the visit was being reconsidered in the light of recent events in China and Hong Kong. There is growing public resentment in Hong Kong at Britain's refusal to grant right of entry to the 3.25 million people entitled to hold a British Hong Kong passport.
BUSINESS
May 15, 1989 | From Times wire services
One-third of Hong Kong citizens are considering leaving the British colony before China resumes sovereignty in 1997, reflecting a loss of confidence in Beijing's promises for a capitalist future, a public opinion poll showed today. Nearly half of those who told pollsters they intend to stay said they had considered emigrating but decided against it for financial reasons, the survey commissioned by the South China Morning Post newspaper said. "These are very serious figures," said David Bottomley, poll director at Inrasia Pacific, which conducted the survey.
NEWS
June 21, 1989 | From Associated Press
Senior leader Deng Xiaoping of China said the United States used troops to quell student demonstrations during the 1960s and should not criticize China for its crackdown on dissidents, a Hong Kong newspaper reported. The English-language South China Morning Post on Tuesday published the full speech Deng delivered to senior military officials June 9, five days after the army entered Beijing to put down the pro-democracy movement. Deng noted that Washington has criticized China for suppressing students but said the United States also mobilized troops against student rioters in the 1960s and 1970s.
OPINION
November 24, 1991
JAPAN "When compared with Europe, Asia continues to be something like 'broccoli' for a large number of Americans. Though aware of its rich nutritional value, many shy away from even tasting the vegetable." --Mainichi Shimbun editorial on President Bush's decision to postpone his trip to Asia "Japan is not a country where foreigners can live comfortably in society." --Daily Yomiuri on rising crime by foreigners "Lukewarm might be the most pleasant state. . . .
NEWS
February 14, 2014 | By Scott Martelle
Now this is spite raised to an art form. As long as my colleagues are posting unconventional love-related stories on Valentine's Day, this one might as well get some play too: A Shanghai man whose romance dissolved last year decided to spread the misery by leading a campaign to buy up every other seat for a Valentine's Day showing of the movie, “Beijing Love Story.” The man crowd-sourced the effort, and other presumably jilted...
BUSINESS
September 24, 2013 | By Jessica Guynn
SAN FRANCISCO -- In what could be the toehold that Facebook has been looking for, the giant social network and other websites banned in China may be accessible in a free-trade zone that is being set up in Shanghai, according to a report in the South China Morning Post. China's first free-trade zone will allow the access in a rare exception to strict government control of the Internet, the Hong Kong newspaper reported . The report, citing unnamed government sources, said authorities would also welcome bids from foreign telecommunications firms for licenses to offer Internet services in the trade zone, an area established in July that covers less than 20 miles.
WORLD
February 4, 2014 | Julie Makinen
BEIJING -- Two Hong Kong brothers accused of attempting to extort about $12,800 from the crew filming Michael Bay's “Transformers: Age of Extinction” last year went on trial Tuesday in the Chinese territory. Mak Chi-shing, 27, and Mak Chi-hang, 28, were each charged with blackmail and assaulting police officers in the Oct. 17 incident; both pleaded not guilty. The two run a shop, Hang Fat Air Conditioner and Water Electrical Co. Prosecutors said in their opening remarks that the elder Mak threw an air-conditioning unit at Bay after the crew refused to pay the amount the Maks had demanded as compensation for disruption to their business.
BUSINESS
September 24, 2013 | By Jessica Guynn
SAN FRANCISCO - Facebook Inc. has just one question for Wall Street: How do you like me now? Shares of the social network, which had fallen from favor after its disastrous public debut last year, hit new highs Tuesday, even as U.S. stocks ended lower Tuesday for the fourth straight session. In recent weeks, Facebook shares have zipped past the initial public offering price of $38. Now they are flirting with $50 after another in a wave of buy recommendations from analysts and a report that the company may finally have gotten its foot in the door in China.
BUSINESS
September 24, 2013 | By Jessica Guynn
SAN FRANCISCO -- In what could be the toehold that Facebook has been looking for, the giant social network and other websites banned in China may be accessible in a free-trade zone that is being set up in Shanghai, according to a report in the South China Morning Post. China's first free-trade zone will allow the access in a rare exception to strict government control of the Internet, the Hong Kong newspaper reported . The report, citing unnamed government sources, said authorities would also welcome bids from foreign telecommunications firms for licenses to offer Internet services in the trade zone, an area established in July that covers less than 20 miles.
WORLD
June 13, 2013 | By Barbara Demick, Los Angeles Times
BEIJING - Officially, the Chinese government has nothing to say about Edward Snowden. But unofficially, its representatives are only too happy to dump on the United States. Chinese state media have let loose with a barrage of criticism of the country's rival world power, especially after former U.S. government contractor Snowden said widespread American Internet surveillance includes spying on people in China. The English-language China Daily on Thursday ran a large cartoon of a shadowed Statue of Liberty holding a tape recorder and microphone instead of a tablet and torch.
WORLD
June 12, 2013 | By Barbara Demick
BEIJING -- Edward Snowden, who says he leaked National Security Agency secrets, told Hong Kong media Wednesday that he intended to remain in the self-ruled Chinese territory and fight extradition to the United States. "I have had many opportunities to flee Hong Kong, but I would rather stay and fight the United States government in the courts, because I have faith in Hong Kong's rule of law,” Snowden told the South China Morning Post in an interview. “My intention is to ask the courts and people of Hong Kong to decide my fate.
WORLD
June 12, 2013 | By Barbara Demick
BEIJING -- Edward Snowden  told Hong Kong media that the United States is involved in extensive hacking operations directed against China and Hong Kong. In an interview with the South China Morning Post published on the newspaper's website early Thursday, Snowden said he wanted to demonstrate “the hypocrisy of the U.S. government when it claims that it does not target civilian infrastructure, unlike its adversaries. " The accusations throw a new wrench into the Obama administration's campaign against extensive hacking operations by the Chinese military.
WORLD
June 13, 2013 | By Barbara Demick, Los Angeles Times
BEIJING - Officially, the Chinese government has nothing to say about Edward Snowden. But unofficially, its representatives are only too happy to dump on the United States. Chinese state media have let loose with a barrage of criticism of the country's rival world power, especially after former U.S. government contractor Snowden said widespread American Internet surveillance includes spying on people in China. The English-language China Daily on Thursday ran a large cartoon of a shadowed Statue of Liberty holding a tape recorder and microphone instead of a tablet and torch.
OPINION
June 23, 1991 | Commentary around the Pacific Rim
PHILIPPINES "My fearless forecast is that the Yanks won't be in a hurry to resume discussions on the bases, much less sign a treaty for their extension. After all, with Clark buried under tons of ashes and volcanic debris, and Subic snowed under by volcanic fallout, it can be asked: What bases ?" --Columnist in the Philippine Star "Pinatubo caused Clark to be a depreciated commodity.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 20, 2012 | Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Times
Richard Baum, a leading China expert at UCLA who founded a lively and influential Internet forum used by hundreds of scholars, diplomats, journalists and government officials to follow ideas and trends in contemporary Chinese politics, died Friday at his Westwood home. He was 72. Baum had cancer, said his son, Matthew. The political scientist was the author of five books, including "Burying Mao: Chinese Politics in the Age of Deng Xiaoping" (1994), considered a definitive work on the transformation of China in the decades immediately after the communist revolutionary leader's 1976 death.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 21, 2010 | By Valerie J. Nelson, Los Angeles Times
In the anti-Communist hysteria of early 1950s America, nuclear physicist Joan Hinton was labeled "The Atom Spy Who Got Away." Recruited at 22 to help develop the atom bomb, she was so repulsed when the U.S. dropped it on Japan during World War II that she fled in 1948 to China, where she embraced Maoism and ran a dairy farm for much of the rest of her life. Magazines from the era presented her in caricature as a trenchcoated femme fatale engaged in nuclear espionage, a charge she always denied.
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