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South Coast Air Quality District

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 19, 1986
Smog is nasty stuff, and politics can be. So when you mix them you can get an acrid reaction that will make you hold your nose a block away. A case in point is that of Sabrina Schiller, who sits on the South Coast Air Quality District board of directors as a "public" representative, appointed by the California Senate Rules Committee. Schiller is not your average smooth politician, working the crowd, going along to get along, patting backs or scratching them.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 2014 | By Jessica Garrison
A Vernon battery recycler may not resume lead smelting until its furnaces can operate in compliance with tough new air district rules on arsenic emissions. The South Coast Air Quality Management District's hearing board ruled Tuesday that Exide Technologies, which is accused of endangering the health of more than 100,000 people across southeast Los Angeles County, must maintain "negative pressure" in its furnaces. That means particles from the smelting process must be sucked into air pollution control devices that can keep toxic compounds from wafting over neighborhoods.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 14, 1988 | LARRY B. STAMMER, Times Staff Writer
Business interests and Los Angeles County officials, warning of job losses and an economic downturn, stepped up their efforts Tuesday by calling for a 90-day delay in adopting a far-reaching clean air plan for the South Coast Air Basin. The plea was issued by Supervisor Mike Antonovich in a press conference and was backed up hours later by a unanimous vote of the Board of Supervisors.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 16, 2013 | By Louis Sahagun
The South Coast Air Quality Management District's top brass faced a frustrated crowd at a town hall meeting Wednesday, during which more than 100 South Los Angeles residents criticized the agency's inability to say whether fumes from an oil field are hazardous. Some of those gathered in an auditorium at the Doheny Campus of Mount St. Mary's College cradled Styrofoam model heads pierced with sewing needles or bound in rope to demonstrate ailments they believe are linked to the oil pumping operation: dizziness, chronic fatigue, severe headaches and nose bleeds.
BUSINESS
December 14, 1992 | Ted Johnson, Times correspondent
When times got tough for business, the South Coast Air Quality Management District became a big target. While the AQMD implements rules to clean up air pollution, businesses complained that they were being squeezed by the organization's fines and permit process. Were the complaints exaggerated? AQMD officials have tried to correct misconceptions and to make the district more "user friendly."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 17, 1990 | JOHN SCHWADA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Los Angeles City Council on Tuesday offered to fund a $150,000 household hazardous waste cleanup program in lieu of paying hefty civil fines for air pollution violations at the city-owned Lopez Canyon Landfill. Councilman Ernani Bernardi and Deputy City Atty. Chris Westhoff predicted that the South Coast Air Quality Management District will accept the offer and drop numerous air pollution citations it issued against the Lake View Terrace landfill.
NEWS
July 31, 1990 | LARRY B. STAMMER, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
Declaring that state and regional clean-air plans for the Los Angeles Basin are inadequate, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency today is expected to propose a series of new smog controls, including possible "no-drive" days for commuters.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 2, 2009 | Catherine Ho
A federal district judge will hear arguments today over whether an air-pollution control agency issued invalid emission credits to businesses and public facilities in one of California's most polluted regions.
WORLD
March 18, 2011 | By Rong-Gong Lin II, Times Staff Writer
Radiation levels in California remain normal, air quality officials said Friday morning. "As far as our monitors go, we have not detected any increases beyond what you'd expect historically. Nothing you can attribute to Japan," said Philip Fine, atmospheric measurements manager of the South Coast Air Quality Management District, the smog control agency for Los Angeles, Orange, Riverside and San Bernardino counties. Fine said he has been spot-checking radiation monitor data throughout California and the West Coast in the past few days, and nothing abnormal has shown up. Other experts have said they do expect small amounts of radioactive isotopes from the stricken Fukushima Daiichi power plant to blow over to California as soon as Friday, but that they expected that the radiation would be well within safe limits.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 16, 2013 | By Louis Sahagun
The South Coast Air Quality Management District's top brass faced a frustrated crowd at a town hall meeting Wednesday, during which more than 100 South Los Angeles residents criticized the agency's inability to say whether fumes from an oil field are hazardous. Some of those gathered in an auditorium at the Doheny Campus of Mount St. Mary's College cradled Styrofoam model heads pierced with sewing needles or bound in rope to demonstrate ailments they believe are linked to the oil pumping operation: dizziness, chronic fatigue, severe headaches and nose bleeds.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 23, 2013 | By Jessica Garrison, Los Angeles Times
A battery recycling plant in Vernon is being told to reduce its emissions after recent tests showed it is posing a danger to as many as 110,000 people living in an area that extends from Boyle Heights to Maywood and Huntington Park. The South Coast Air Quality Management District announced late Friday that Exide Technologies, one of the largest battery recyclers in the world, must also hold public meetings later this spring to inform residents that they face an increased cancer risk and outline steps being taken to reduce it. Air district officials said Exide's most recent assessment showed a higher cancer risk affecting a larger number of residents than any other of the more than 450 regulated facilities in Southern California over the 25-year history of a program to monitor toxic air contaminants.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 25, 2012 | By Maura Dolan, Los Angeles Times
Southern California air pollution authorities may require pollution controls based on technologies that do not exist but may be reasonably anticipated, the California Supreme Court ruled unanimously Monday. The state high court decision was a victory for environmental agencies that set standards intended to spur the development of new, greener technology, though manufacturers warned that consumers may be forced to buy inferior products as a result. Justice Goodwin Liu, writing for the court, said pollution standards that depend on future advances are permissible as long as the new technology is "reasonably anticipated to exist by the compliance deadline.
WORLD
March 18, 2011 | By Rong-Gong Lin II, Times Staff Writer
Radiation levels in California remain normal, air quality officials said Friday morning. "As far as our monitors go, we have not detected any increases beyond what you'd expect historically. Nothing you can attribute to Japan," said Philip Fine, atmospheric measurements manager of the South Coast Air Quality Management District, the smog control agency for Los Angeles, Orange, Riverside and San Bernardino counties. Fine said he has been spot-checking radiation monitor data throughout California and the West Coast in the past few days, and nothing abnormal has shown up. Other experts have said they do expect small amounts of radioactive isotopes from the stricken Fukushima Daiichi power plant to blow over to California as soon as Friday, but that they expected that the radiation would be well within safe limits.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 9, 2010 | By Margot Roosevelt, Los Angeles Times
Eleven major oil refineries and industrial plants in the Los Angeles area will be forced to slash sulfur pollution by more than 2,000 tons a year under sweeping new regulations, but the move may not be enough to meet federal health standards for the region unless the state maintains strict curbs on truck pollution. The new rule, adopted by the South Coast Air Quality Management District, takes aim at airborne sulfur that, along with other pollutants, forms soot. It effectively halves the amount of sulfur oxides that can be emitted in the district, which covers Orange County and major portions of Los Angeles, San Bernardino and Riverside counties.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 2, 2009 | Catherine Ho
A federal district judge will hear arguments today over whether an air-pollution control agency issued invalid emission credits to businesses and public facilities in one of California's most polluted regions.
BUSINESS
December 14, 1992 | Ted Johnson, Times correspondent
When times got tough for business, the South Coast Air Quality Management District became a big target. While the AQMD implements rules to clean up air pollution, businesses complained that they were being squeezed by the organization's fines and permit process. Were the complaints exaggerated? AQMD officials have tried to correct misconceptions and to make the district more "user friendly."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 6, 1991 | GEORGE HATCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The South Coast Air Quality Management District on Friday decided to phase out large-scale use of hydrofluoric acid by 1999 unless a safe form of the acutely hazardous substance is developed by 1995. The action, approved by the agency's governing board in an 11-0 vote, affects four oil refineries and a chemical plant, all in the Los Angeles area. It sets phased deadlines of Jan. 1, 1998, for the refineries, which use the acid to produce high-grade unleaded gasoline, and Jan. 1, 1999, for the Allied Signal plant in El Segundo, where the substance is used in the manufacture of refrigerants.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 2014 | By Jessica Garrison
A Vernon battery recycler may not resume lead smelting until its furnaces can operate in compliance with tough new air district rules on arsenic emissions. The South Coast Air Quality Management District's hearing board ruled Tuesday that Exide Technologies, which is accused of endangering the health of more than 100,000 people across southeast Los Angeles County, must maintain "negative pressure" in its furnaces. That means particles from the smelting process must be sucked into air pollution control devices that can keep toxic compounds from wafting over neighborhoods.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 6, 1991 | GEORGE HATCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The South Coast Air Quality Management District on Friday decided to phase out large-scale use of hydrofluoric acid by 1999 unless a safe form of the acutely hazardous substance is developed by 1995. The action, approved by the agency's governing board in an 11-0 vote, affects four oil refineries and a chemical plant, all in the Los Angeles area. It sets phased deadlines of Jan. 1, 1998, for the refineries, which use the acid to produce high-grade unleaded gasoline, and Jan. 1, 1999, for the Allied Signal plant in El Segundo, where the substance is used in the manufacture of refrigerants.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 17, 1990 | JOHN SCHWADA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Los Angeles City Council on Tuesday offered to fund a $150,000 household hazardous waste cleanup program in lieu of paying hefty civil fines for air pollution violations at the city-owned Lopez Canyon Landfill. Councilman Ernani Bernardi and Deputy City Atty. Chris Westhoff predicted that the South Coast Air Quality Management District will accept the offer and drop numerous air pollution citations it issued against the Lake View Terrace landfill.
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