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South Coast Air Quality Management District

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BUSINESS
December 14, 1992 | Ted Johnson, Times correspondent
When times got tough for business, the South Coast Air Quality Management District became a big target. While the AQMD implements rules to clean up air pollution, businesses complained that they were being squeezed by the organization's fines and permit process. Were the complaints exaggerated? AQMD officials have tried to correct misconceptions and to make the district more "user friendly."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 2014 | By Jessica Garrison
A Vernon battery recycler may not resume lead smelting until its furnaces can operate in compliance with tough new air district rules on arsenic emissions. The South Coast Air Quality Management District's hearing board ruled Tuesday that Exide Technologies, which is accused of endangering the health of more than 100,000 people across southeast Los Angeles County, must maintain "negative pressure" in its furnaces. That means particles from the smelting process must be sucked into air pollution control devices that can keep toxic compounds from wafting over neighborhoods.
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NEWS
July 31, 1990 | LARRY B. STAMMER, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
Declaring that state and regional clean-air plans for the Los Angeles Basin are inadequate, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency today is expected to propose a series of new smog controls, including possible "no-drive" days for commuters.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 16, 2013 | By Louis Sahagun
The South Coast Air Quality Management District's top brass faced a frustrated crowd at a town hall meeting Wednesday, during which more than 100 South Los Angeles residents criticized the agency's inability to say whether fumes from an oil field are hazardous. Some of those gathered in an auditorium at the Doheny Campus of Mount St. Mary's College cradled Styrofoam model heads pierced with sewing needles or bound in rope to demonstrate ailments they believe are linked to the oil pumping operation: dizziness, chronic fatigue, severe headaches and nose bleeds.
NEWS
April 15, 1990 | JOEL SAPPELL
Twenty years ago, Jim Lents was just breaking into the pollution control business. He remembers reading about Earth Day, but didn't do anything to mark the occasion. As he recalls, "I don't think there were any ceremonies in Tullahoma, Tenn." At the time, Lents was a rocket combustion expert at the University of Tennessee Space Institute. But, with the environmental movement gaining momentum, he found himself becoming more interested in emissions than missiles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 24, 1988
California's Advisory Board on Air Quality and Fuels will discuss the environmental effects of shifting from gasoline to cleaner-burning transportation fuels at a three-day public workshop that begins Tuesday. The workshop will be held at the South Coast Air Quality Management District in El Monte.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 9, 1990
Covina Councilman Henry M. Morgan has won election to the 12-member board of the South Coast Air Quality Management District. Morgan will represent the eastern region of Los Angeles County, including 61 cities from Long Beach to Pomona to Santa Clarita. The election late last week was forced by the departure of Leo King, who resigned as mayor of Baldwin Park and as a member of the air board.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 8, 2005 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Area oil refineries must reduce their use of flaring to burn excess gases under restrictions approved by the board of the South Coast Air Quality Management District. Residents have complained for years of potential health risks when refineries vent and ignite gases. Refineries call flaring a safety measure, but a district study found that in 2003, the practice produced 2 tons of sulfur oxides daily, or as much as all the region's large diesel trucks.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 23, 2013 | By Jessica Garrison, Los Angeles Times
A battery recycling plant in Vernon is being told to reduce its emissions after recent tests showed it is posing a danger to as many as 110,000 people living in an area that extends from Boyle Heights to Maywood and Huntington Park. The South Coast Air Quality Management District announced late Friday that Exide Technologies, one of the largest battery recyclers in the world, must also hold public meetings later this spring to inform residents that they face an increased cancer risk and outline steps being taken to reduce it. Air district officials said Exide's most recent assessment showed a higher cancer risk affecting a larger number of residents than any other of the more than 450 regulated facilities in Southern California over the 25-year history of a program to monitor toxic air contaminants.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 25, 2012 | By Maura Dolan, Los Angeles Times
Southern California air pollution authorities may require pollution controls based on technologies that do not exist but may be reasonably anticipated, the California Supreme Court ruled unanimously Monday. The state high court decision was a victory for environmental agencies that set standards intended to spur the development of new, greener technology, though manufacturers warned that consumers may be forced to buy inferior products as a result. Justice Goodwin Liu, writing for the court, said pollution standards that depend on future advances are permissible as long as the new technology is "reasonably anticipated to exist by the compliance deadline.
WORLD
March 18, 2011 | By Rong-Gong Lin II, Times Staff Writer
Radiation levels in California remain normal, air quality officials said Friday morning. "As far as our monitors go, we have not detected any increases beyond what you'd expect historically. Nothing you can attribute to Japan," said Philip Fine, atmospheric measurements manager of the South Coast Air Quality Management District, the smog control agency for Los Angeles, Orange, Riverside and San Bernardino counties. Fine said he has been spot-checking radiation monitor data throughout California and the West Coast in the past few days, and nothing abnormal has shown up. Other experts have said they do expect small amounts of radioactive isotopes from the stricken Fukushima Daiichi power plant to blow over to California as soon as Friday, but that they expected that the radiation would be well within safe limits.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 9, 2010 | By Margot Roosevelt, Los Angeles Times
Eleven major oil refineries and industrial plants in the Los Angeles area will be forced to slash sulfur pollution by more than 2,000 tons a year under sweeping new regulations, but the move may not be enough to meet federal health standards for the region unless the state maintains strict curbs on truck pollution. The new rule, adopted by the South Coast Air Quality Management District, takes aim at airborne sulfur that, along with other pollutants, forms soot. It effectively halves the amount of sulfur oxides that can be emitted in the district, which covers Orange County and major portions of Los Angeles, San Bernardino and Riverside counties.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 2, 2009 | Catherine Ho
A federal district judge will hear arguments today over whether an air-pollution control agency issued invalid emission credits to businesses and public facilities in one of California's most polluted regions.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 20, 2008 | Janet Wilson, Times Staff Writer
Dangerous levels of toxic lead were emitted by a Southern California battery recycling facility for months, until regulators ordered the facility to cut production by almost half, officials said. An Exide Technologies facility in Vernon, one of just two such battery recycling facilities west of the Rockies, was emitting lead at levels nearly twice the allowable federal limits from December to April, according to South Coast Air Quality Management District staff.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 3, 2005 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Air pollution caused by the Los Angeles-Long Beach seaport complex will be addressed in Long Beach on Friday by the board of the South Coast Air Quality Management District. The ports rank as the region's largest air polluter. The board meeting, the first held away from AQMD headquarters in more than 25 years, will begin at 9 a.m. at Long Beach City Hall, 333 W. Ocean Blvd. Members of the public are invited to speak from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m.
BUSINESS
February 6, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Volume Jumps at 2nd AQMD Air-Pollution Credit Auction: Five times the volume of trades occurred in the auction, held Jan. 27, according to environmental consultants Dames & Moore's Air Trade Services and Cantor Fitzgerald, a brokerage firm. The two companies sponsor and administer the trading. Under the South Coast Air Quality Management District program, Southern California businesses can buy and sell credits to emit specified amounts of air pollutants.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 17, 2008 | Janet Wilson
State health officials are examining records and talking with Riverside County officials about testing done at a well next to a Crestmore Heights cement plant where regulators have discovered high levels of a cancer-causing toxin called hexavalent chromium. Area residents have used the well for drinking water for decades, and officials are now investigating where the residents now obtain their water. "We're taking this very seriously," said Ken August, a spokesman for the state Department of Public Health.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 8, 2007 | Marla Cone, Times Staff Writer
In the wake of wildfires that caused unhealthful air from the mountains to the sea, the region's air quality board Friday expanded the monitoring network that allows the public immediate access to local smoke conditions. At a cost of $225,000, the South Coast Air Quality Management District will add four new sites to the existing 14 that continuously report levels of airborne particulates, plus four mobile stations that can be deployed to smoky areas.
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