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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 18, 1994 | MIGUEL BUSTILLO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Oxnard should consider firing South Coast Area Transit and starting a city-run bus system or hiring a private transit service if SCAT does not reduce its operating budget, a city report has concluded. At the request of Councilman Michael A. Plisky, who thinks Oxnard spends too much on public transit, the city's Traffic Department has prepared a report analyzing the fiscal efficiency of SCAT, which has provided bus service to the city for 20 years.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 5, 2001 | CATHERINE BLAKE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Most new employees are given some time to acclimate, to learn the ropes. Deborah Linehan will have two days. On her third day as general manager of west Ventura County's bus service, Linehan is scheduled to make a recommendation that boils down to this: Should SCAT dump Laidlaw Transit after months of complaints from riders? It will be a fast start for Linehan, 44, who will take over today as administrative leader of South Coast Area Transit, which provides 3.7 million bus rides a year.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 23, 1993 | PHIL SNEIDERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The directors of Ventura County's largest bus system voted Thursday to raise the basic adult fare from 75 cents to $1--the system's first fare hike in more than a decade. But concerned that the new increase would hurt low-income riders, South Coast Area Transit officials decided to maintain the current price for monthly bus passes and booklets of tickets purchased in advance. By buying ahead of time, bus riders can save from 33% to 44% of the new single-ride price, transit officials said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 24, 2000 | CATHERINE BLAKE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The county Transportation Commission is threatening to withhold $1.6 million from the west county's bus agency because it spent a $108,000 budget surplus in 1999 instead of crediting the money to local cities for future use. The handling of the surplus underscores concerns some city officials have long held about the bus agency's ability to manage its money.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 24, 2000 | CATHERINE BLAKE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The county Transportation Commission is threatening to withhold $1.6 million from the west county's bus agency because it spent a $108,000 budget surplus in 1999 instead of crediting the money to local cities for future use. The handling of the surplus underscores concerns some city officials have long held about the bus agency's ability to manage its money.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 5, 2001 | CATHERINE BLAKE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Most new employees are given some time to acclimate, to learn the ropes. Deborah Linehan will have two days. On her third day as general manager of west Ventura County's bus service, Linehan is scheduled to make a recommendation that boils down to this: Should SCAT dump Laidlaw Transit after months of complaints from riders? It will be a fast start for Linehan, 44, who will take over today as administrative leader of South Coast Area Transit, which provides 3.7 million bus rides a year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 21, 1993 | PHIL SNEIDERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ventura County's largest bus system, South Coast Area Transit, is considering its first fare hike in more than a decade at the request of two of the cities that help pay its bills. The transit system's directors, who usually meet in their own small board room, have reserved the Oxnard City Council chambers because they expect a large turnout at a fare-hike hearing that will begin at 1:30 p.m. Thursday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 3, 1993 | PHIL SNEIDERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Beginning Monday, riding a South Coast Area Transit bus will become more expensive and more complicated for Janet Wright, a Port Hueneme resident. Her bus fare will jump from 75 cents to $1, and the drivers will no longer make change. "That will be a problem," said Wright. "I don't always have a dollar bill with me. Sometimes I just have a five." But bus driver Mary Taylor, who believes the change she carries is a tempting target for robbers, says her job will become less dangerous. "It's great!"
NEWS
April 6, 1989 | MEG SULLIVAN, Times Staff Writer
If Oxnard's response is any indication, a bumpy road lies ahead for South Coast Area Transit officials attempting to revamp the west county bus system that has long suffered from dwindling ridership. Oxnard City Council members this week gave only cautious support to streamlining local routes by cutting the number of stops. They also expressed strong opposition to funneling more of the city's money into the flagging system.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 9, 1990 | JANE HULSE
Graffiti, which can be the signature of gang members, is costing cities and other agencies in Ventura County a bundle to remove, and some officials say it's only getting worse. This year, the tab for graffiti removal in Ventura, Thousand Oaks and Oxnard is expected to run about $275,000. Smaller cities are straining to absorb the cost in their maintenance budgets. Public agencies also are getting socked with removal costs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 18, 1994 | MIGUEL BUSTILLO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Oxnard should consider firing South Coast Area Transit and starting a city-run bus system or hiring a private transit service if SCAT does not reduce its operating budget, a city report has concluded. At the request of Councilman Michael A. Plisky, who thinks Oxnard spends too much on public transit, the city's Traffic Department has prepared a report analyzing the fiscal efficiency of SCAT, which has provided bus service to the city for 20 years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 3, 1993 | PHIL SNEIDERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Beginning Monday, riding a South Coast Area Transit bus will become more expensive and more complicated for Janet Wright, a Port Hueneme resident. Her bus fare will jump from 75 cents to $1, and the drivers will no longer make change. "That will be a problem," said Wright. "I don't always have a dollar bill with me. Sometimes I just have a five." But bus driver Mary Taylor, who believes the change she carries is a tempting target for robbers, says her job will become less dangerous. "It's great!"
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 23, 1993 | PHIL SNEIDERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The directors of Ventura County's largest bus system voted Thursday to raise the basic adult fare from 75 cents to $1--the system's first fare hike in more than a decade. But concerned that the new increase would hurt low-income riders, South Coast Area Transit officials decided to maintain the current price for monthly bus passes and booklets of tickets purchased in advance. By buying ahead of time, bus riders can save from 33% to 44% of the new single-ride price, transit officials said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 21, 1993 | PHIL SNEIDERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ventura County's largest bus system, South Coast Area Transit, is considering its first fare hike in more than a decade at the request of two of the cities that help pay its bills. The transit system's directors, who usually meet in their own small board room, have reserved the Oxnard City Council chambers because they expect a large turnout at a fare-hike hearing that will begin at 1:30 p.m. Thursday.
NEWS
April 6, 1989 | MEG SULLIVAN, Times Staff Writer
If Oxnard's response is any indication, a bumpy road lies ahead for South Coast Area Transit officials attempting to revamp the west county bus system that has long suffered from dwindling ridership. Oxnard City Council members this week gave only cautious support to streamlining local routes by cutting the number of stops. They also expressed strong opposition to funneling more of the city's money into the flagging system.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 30, 1995 | JEFF MCDONALD
One year after launching a public transit service for disabled people, South Coast Area Transit officials reported more than 10,000 trips have been taken aboard the agency's special vans during the program's first 12 months. Ridership is expected to double by next year because there are at least 1,500 additional eligible riders who have not taken advantage of the program, agency spokeswoman Maureen Hooper Lopez said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 29, 2002 | From Times Staff Reports
Ventura City Councilman Jim Friedman has been elected chairman of the South Coast Area Transit Board of Directors for fiscal 2002-03. John Flynn, chairman of the county Board of Supervisors, will serve as vice chairman of the five-member panel. SCAT is a joint-powers agency that provides bus and other transit service in western Ventura County. The agency logged about 3.4 million passenger trips on 15 routes in fiscal 2001-02.
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