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April 25, 2002 | JAMES GERSTENZANG and JANET HOOK, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Bush and Senate Majority Leader Tom Daschle (D-S.D.) are like two feuding dance partners: They are doing their best to step on each other's toes but not have anyone notice. They flew separately halfway across the country on Wednesday, their destination an ethanol plant where together they could promote the corn-based gasoline additive as a means to reduce the nation's reliance on imported petroleum. Daschle then left the state.
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NEWS
April 25, 2002 | JAMES GERSTENZANG and JANET HOOK, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Bush and Senate Majority Leader Tom Daschle (D-S.D.) are like two feuding dance partners: They are doing their best to step on each other's toes but not have anyone notice. They flew separately halfway across the country on Wednesday, their destination an ethanol plant where together they could promote the corn-based gasoline additive as a means to reduce the nation's reliance on imported petroleum. Daschle then left the state.
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NEWS
September 29, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The body of Long Wolf, a Sioux chief who died 105 years ago in London while traveling with Buffalo Bill Cody's Wild West Show, was buried atop a wind-swept hill in Wolf Creek, S.D., his ancestral land. "I'm very glad my grandfather is home. I feel very good now," said Jessie Black Feather, 87, Long Wolf's closest living descendant. Long Wolf died of pneumonia in London in 1892.
TRAVEL
July 15, 2001 | EILEEN OGINTZ
The next time conversation lags after three hours in the car, ask the kids where they can see a guy with a 20-foot-long nose. Here's a hint: Conceived as a tourist gimmick and celebrating its 60th birthday, it's recognized around the world as a symbol of the United States and democracy. Stumped? The answer is Mt. Rushmore. This will give the kids an in-your-face history lesson they won't soon forget.
TRAVEL
July 15, 2001 | EILEEN OGINTZ
The next time conversation lags after three hours in the car, ask the kids where they can see a guy with a 20-foot-long nose. Here's a hint: Conceived as a tourist gimmick and celebrating its 60th birthday, it's recognized around the world as a symbol of the United States and democracy. Stumped? The answer is Mt. Rushmore. This will give the kids an in-your-face history lesson they won't soon forget.
NEWS
March 2, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Under a new state law, more than three dozen South Dakota towns will be renamed to remove the words "Squaw" or "Negro" because the words are offensive. Among the place names deemed by the bill to be "offensive and insulting to all of South Dakota's people, history, and heritage," were Squaw Lake, to be renamed Serenity Lake, and Negro Gulch, to be renamed Last Chance Gulch.
TRAVEL
August 12, 2001
After finishing a South Dakota vacation with my children, 9, 7 and 4 years old, I want to note some attractions unmentioned in your recent column ("Around South Dakota, History Is Writ Large and Set in Stone," Taking the Kids, July 15). In Hill City, S.D., just behind Mt. Rushmore, there are daily Conestoga covered wagon rides that take you off the road and back into the hills. We saw two deer and mountain lion tracks. Also in Hill City, there's the Black Hills Institute of Geological Research, which houses bones from a Tyrannosaurus rex . The Mammoth Site in Hot Springs, S.D., was mentioned, but not Evans Plunge in the same town: a natural hot spring that is a wonderful place for kids to have fun, with water slides and tubes.
NEWS
January 24, 2004 | Sue Larson Pascoe, Sue Larson Pascoe is a writer in Los Angeles.
The saying goes, "It takes a village to raise a child." In California around this time of year, parents of fourth-grade students amend the aphorism to: "It takes a family to raise an Indian village as well as its accompanying mission." My mission odyssey began two years ago when my daughter was in private school. I helped her study for tests covering Father Junipero Serra and the California mission system. My daughter was assigned the San Fernando Mission as a research project.
NEWS
September 29, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The body of Long Wolf, a Sioux chief who died 105 years ago in London while traveling with Buffalo Bill Cody's Wild West Show, was buried atop a wind-swept hill in Wolf Creek, S.D., his ancestral land. "I'm very glad my grandfather is home. I feel very good now," said Jessie Black Feather, 87, Long Wolf's closest living descendant. Long Wolf died of pneumonia in London in 1892.
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