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NATIONAL
July 19, 2007 | Carol J. Williams, Times Staff Writer
Conservationist Marjory Stoneman Douglas once famously grumbled that Lake Okeechobee, the liquid heart of her beloved Everglades, had been poisoned by man's careless disposal of "pesticides, fertilizer, dead cats and old boots." She didn't know about the 1920s steamship, rusty anchors, tractor tires, fishing-boat motors, settlers' stovepipes, Native American tools and jewelry, and the bones of man and beast dating back thousands of years. All were hauled from the lake bottom this summer.
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SPORTS
October 28, 2007 | From the Associated Press
STORRS, Conn. -- Andre Dixon ran for a career-high 167 yards and Connecticut used a late goal-line stand to upset No. 11 South Florida, 22-15, the Huskies' first win over a ranked opponent. The victory keeps Connecticut (7-1, 3-0) in sole possession of first place in the Big East Conference. "I think we earned a lot of respect today," Coach Randy Edsall said. South Florida (6-2, 1-2), which was ranked No. 2 two weeks ago, has lost two games in a row.
NEWS
August 1, 1995 | MIKE CLARY and ANNA M. VIRTUE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Hurricane Erin drew a bead on South Florida on Monday, gaining strength as it headed slowly westward over the Atlantic and sending Miami-area residents into a frantic rush of last-minute preparation. More than 600,000 coastal residents from Palm Beach to the Florida Keys were ordered to evacuate their homes by early evening, when the storm is expected to blow ashore with winds that could approach 85 m.p.h.
NEWS
February 2, 1994 | MIKE CLARY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Todd Hardwick doesn't do dogs and cats. He does buffalo. He wrestles baboons. He pries stubborn six-foot Asian monitor lizards from unlikely hiding places, fires tranquilizing darts at monkeys looting a house, drags angry alligators away from back doors. He does snakes. You might have seen him do his largest snake, a 22-foot, 250-pound python he pulled from beneath a house in Ft. Lauderdale about four years ago.
NEWS
September 9, 1992 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush asked Congress on Tuesday to approve $7.6 billion in disaster assistance in the wake of Hurricane Andrew, calling for bipartisan support of the measure, even though it will bloat the federal budget deficit. Most of the money would be earmarked for the areas of South Florida and Louisiana that were devastated by the cataclysmic storm two weeks ago. The proposal also includes financial aid for victims of Typhoon Omar in Guam.
NEWS
September 7, 1993 | JOHN M. BRODER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton journeyed to South Florida on Monday to offer moral support to the victims of last year's Hurricane Andrew, but he could not escape questions about his budget plans and his support for the North American Free Trade Agreement.
NATIONAL
February 4, 2004 | John-Thor Dahlburg, Times Staff Writer
When the Queen Mary 2, the world's biggest passenger ship, nosed out to sea on its maiden voyage to the Caribbean, along with sun-famished passengers by the hundreds, it carried $600,000 in Florida-bought food and drink, including some hastily purchased beer. For on the eve of the liner's departure from this south Florida port, employees on QM2 had an unexpected request to the corporate offices in Miami: beer in plastic bottles for the Super Bowl fans on board.
SPORTS
October 23, 1993 | GREG LOGAN, NEWSDAY
They are hockey refugees from New York -- former Islanders president Bill Torrey and former Rangers coach Roger Neilson and goaltender John Vanbiesbrouck -- three amigos who have followed the traditional migratory route south to Florida to start a new life. None of them really wanted to start over at this stage of their careers, yet all three have become infused with the pioneer spirit as they lay the foundation for ice hockey in South Florida.
NEWS
September 20, 1992 | MIKE CLARY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Miraculously, after his wife sprinkled holy water around the house, Domingos Gonsalves slept through the storm. But in the three weeks since, he has hardly slept at all. "I wish I could sleep," said Gonsalves, 54, a small man with short-cropped gray hair who owns a concrete paving business. "All my family lost their houses--my sons, my parents are living here. My wife and I are screaming at each other. Customers are calling. I've got $200,000 damage to my office. "I'm trying to stay calm.
NEWS
November 28, 1992 | MIKE CLARY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Ron Bishop, uninsured, his house blown apart, fighting the temptation to start drinking again, is planning to leave. "I'm sick of everything here," he said. "I'll go to central Florida and get me some property and a mobile home." Marsha and Ken Pitts are still staying with friends while their home, gutted by Hurricane Andrew's winds, is rebuilt from the drywall out. Both have gained weight, and Ken is chewing more tobacco and enjoying it less.
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