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NEWS
October 22, 1999 | JOCELYN Y. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In 1987, the year Lindsay Cox turned 1, the Los Angeles school board voted to close Tweedy Elementary School in South Gate because of health concerns caused by nearby industrial sites. In its place, the district set up a makeshift school in a city park--a collection of bungalows on a fenced-off slab of asphalt. The plan was to build a replacement school and another high school. Twelve years later, Lindsay is a pretty, dark-haired 13-year-old, with a love of theater and ballet folklorico.
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NEWS
January 12, 2000 | DOUG SMITH and HUGO MARTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Los Angeles Board of Education decided Tuesday to cut its losses on one of two construction projects that have turned into environmental fiascoes, voting to abandon plans for a new high school and elementary school in South Gate. Rather than build on 40 acres long occupied by foundries, plating shops and automotive facilities, the district will launch a program to acquire small properties for 13 new primary centers for kindergarten through third grade.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 15, 1994 | LISA RESPERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's not every day that middle school students get to make comets with their own hands or launch rockets under the direction of . . . a rocket scientist. But there they were, 400 of them at the California Museum of Science and Industry, mixing dry ice, soil, water, balsamic acid and Worcestershire sauce into frozen balls of ice and dirt. "It was cool because . . .
NEWS
October 23, 1999 | JIM NEWTON and TIM RUTTEN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
All things being equal, it's not where you'd want to send a child to school. The Los Angeles Unified School District plans to build two schools--one for elementary students, the other for high schoolers--on a roughly square, 40-acre tract in South Gate bordered on one side by the Los Angeles River and zoned for the region's heaviest, most polluting industries. Around the neighborhood, many students, desperate over the crowding in their schools, are pushing for the project to be completed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 6, 1988
Classes began Tuesday at the first elementary school to be built in 17 years in the Los Angeles Unified School District. The $10.5-million Montara Avenue School in South Gate, which can hold up to 1,000 students, will operate year-round because of a shortage of classroom space. Other unique features include connecting classrooms to facilitate team teaching and office space for kindergarten teachers who share classrooms, said Principal De Whayne Gallups.
NEWS
October 16, 1999 | DOUG SMITH, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
Even after the environmentally plagued Belmont Learning Complex had become a public embarrassment, Los Angeles school officials pressed on with efforts to acquire industrial property for two new South Gate schools without clearly understanding the enormous cleanup costs or even determining whether the project was feasible, records show.
NEWS
October 23, 1999 | JIM NEWTON and TIM RUTTEN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
All things being equal, it's not where you'd want to send a child to school. The Los Angeles Unified School District plans to build two schools--one for elementary students, the other for high schoolers--on a roughly square, 40-acre tract in South Gate bordered on one side by the Los Angeles River and zoned for the region's heaviest, most polluting industries. Around the neighborhood, many students, desperate over the crowding in their schools, are pushing for the project to be completed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 18, 1987 | ELAINE WOO, Times Education Writer
Tacked up on kitchen walls all over South Gate are funny looking long cards with red, blue and green lines resembling miniature railroad tracks. From a distance, they look like strange Christmas cards, but to South Gate residents they symbolize a way of life. The cards, in fact, are calendars for the year-round school schedule that this closely knit working-class city about 10 miles southeast of Los Angeles embraced nearly a decade ago.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 6, 1998 | DOUG SMITH, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
Construction of a badly needed school complex in South Gate could be delayed a year or more and its price tag raised millions of dollars because the school district must conduct new toxic studies of the site, school officials said Thursday. Testifying at a legislative hearing, a Los Angeles Unified School District spokesman acknowledged that there has not been adequate assessment of toxic contamination at the former industrial property the district has been acquiring in pieces since 1988.
NEWS
October 15, 1999 | DOUG SMITH, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
The South Gate school site that sparked this week's battle over control of the Los Angeles Unified School District is far more contaminated than the Belmont Learning Complex, records show. Belmont, being constructed on a former oil field west of downtown, is primarily affected by explosive methane and toxic hydrogen sulfide, but it has been found relatively free of industrial wastes. The earth at the South Gate site is full of them.
NEWS
October 22, 1999 | JOCELYN Y. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In 1987, the year Lindsay Cox turned 1, the Los Angeles school board voted to close Tweedy Elementary School in South Gate because of health concerns caused by nearby industrial sites. In its place, the district set up a makeshift school in a city park--a collection of bungalows on a fenced-off slab of asphalt. The plan was to build a replacement school and another high school. Twelve years later, Lindsay is a pretty, dark-haired 13-year-old, with a love of theater and ballet folklorico.
NEWS
October 16, 1999 | DOUG SMITH, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
Even after the environmentally plagued Belmont Learning Complex had become a public embarrassment, Los Angeles school officials pressed on with efforts to acquire industrial property for two new South Gate schools without clearly understanding the enormous cleanup costs or even determining whether the project was feasible, records show.
NEWS
October 15, 1999 | DOUG SMITH, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
The South Gate school site that sparked this week's battle over control of the Los Angeles Unified School District is far more contaminated than the Belmont Learning Complex, records show. Belmont, being constructed on a former oil field west of downtown, is primarily affected by explosive methane and toxic hydrogen sulfide, but it has been found relatively free of industrial wastes. The earth at the South Gate site is full of them.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 6, 1998 | DOUG SMITH, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
Construction of a badly needed school complex in South Gate could be delayed a year or more and its price tag raised millions of dollars because the school district must conduct new toxic studies of the site, school officials said Thursday. Testifying at a legislative hearing, a Los Angeles Unified School District spokesman acknowledged that there has not been adequate assessment of toxic contamination at the former industrial property the district has been acquiring in pieces since 1988.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 15, 1994 | LISA RESPERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's not every day that middle school students get to make comets with their own hands or launch rockets under the direction of . . . a rocket scientist. But there they were, 400 of them at the California Museum of Science and Industry, mixing dry ice, soil, water, balsamic acid and Worcestershire sauce into frozen balls of ice and dirt. "It was cool because . . .
NEWS
March 6, 1994 | MARY HELEN BERG
It's amazing what you can do with Popsicle sticks and glue. Eighth-graders at South Gate Junior High thought they were constructing model catapults for the second annual Catapult Design Competition, sponsored by the Associate Member Forum of the American Society of Civil Engineers. But they were building confidence and pride too.
NEWS
January 12, 2000 | DOUG SMITH and HUGO MARTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Los Angeles Board of Education decided Tuesday to cut its losses on one of two construction projects that have turned into environmental fiascoes, voting to abandon plans for a new high school and elementary school in South Gate. Rather than build on 40 acres long occupied by foundries, plating shops and automotive facilities, the district will launch a program to acquire small properties for 13 new primary centers for kindergarten through third grade.
NEWS
March 6, 1994 | MARY HELEN BERG
It's amazing what you can do with Popsicle sticks and glue. Eighth-graders at South Gate Junior High thought they were constructing model catapults for the second annual Catapult Design Competition, sponsored by the Associate Member Forum of the American Society of Civil Engineers. But they were building confidence and pride too.
NEWS
January 9, 1994 | MARY HELEN BERG
Los Angeles Unified School District officials are considering a proposal that would place a private health clinic on the South Gate Middle School campus to serve students and their families. The proposal, a collaborative effort of St. Francis Medical Center in Lynwood and Cal State Dominguez Hills, is similar to a project under way in Lynwood and is part of the center's Targeting Healthy Communities project, said Gerald Kozai, St.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 6, 1988
Classes began Tuesday at the first elementary school to be built in 17 years in the Los Angeles Unified School District. The $10.5-million Montara Avenue School in South Gate, which can hold up to 1,000 students, will operate year-round because of a shortage of classroom space. Other unique features include connecting classrooms to facilitate team teaching and office space for kindergarten teachers who share classrooms, said Principal De Whayne Gallups.
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