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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 6, 1999
The city plans to dedicate a street next week to its most famous former resident, Nobel Prize-winning chemist Glenn T. Seaborg. Seaborg--who won the Nobel Prize in 1951 for discovering the radioactive element plutonium--lived in South Gate as a youngster, attending school in Watts before enrolling at UCLA. Seaborg was the first scientist to head the Atomic Energy Commission. He was also chancellor of UC Berkeley and co-founder of the Pacific 10 athletic conference.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 6, 1999
The city plans to dedicate a street next week to its most famous former resident, Nobel Prize-winning chemist Glenn T. Seaborg. Seaborg--who won the Nobel Prize in 1951 for discovering the radioactive element plutonium--lived in South Gate as a youngster, attending school in Watts before enrolling at UCLA. Seaborg was the first scientist to head the Atomic Energy Commission. He was also chancellor of UC Berkeley and co-founder of the Pacific 10 athletic conference.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 10, 1997
Major traffic arteries in South Gate will soon feature 10 graffiti-deterrent bus shelters. The shelters, built with mesh benches, will provide taggers minimal surfaces to disfigure. Intersections along Long Beach Boulevard, Atlantic Boulevard and Garfield Avenue will be fitted with roofed shelters, benches, trash receptacles and solar lighting. The project, scheduled for completion next year, is funded with $80,000 in city money and a $20,000 grant from the Metropolitan Transportation
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 10, 1997
Major traffic arteries in South Gate will soon feature 10 graffiti-deterrent bus shelters. The shelters, built with mesh benches, will provide taggers minimal surfaces to disfigure. Intersections along Long Beach Boulevard, Atlantic Boulevard and Garfield Avenue will be fitted with roofed shelters, benches, trash receptacles and solar lighting. The project, scheduled for completion next year, is funded with $80,000 in city money and a $20,000 grant from the Metropolitan Transportation
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