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South Korea Agriculture

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BUSINESS
September 13, 1990 | From Reuters
South Korea will not budge from its refusal to open its market to foreign rice and will keep price controls on rice to protect its farmers, an agriculture ministry official said Wednesday. Kim Jong-yong, the ministry's director general for international cooperation, told reporters that Seoul was forced to ask for special concessions to keep its rice market closed. The current round of negotiations under the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade aims to liberalize global trade.
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NEWS
June 13, 2001 | From Associated Press
Soldiers in South Korea put down their guns Tuesday and picked up buckets and water hoses to fight a new enemy: drought. Facing its worst dry spell in 90 years--and a threat to its staple food, rice--South Korea mobilized a fifth of its total military force to help farms. The 130,000 troops were dispatched to 90 hard-hit regions, armed with drilling machines, trucks, excavators and pumping motors to dig wells or draw water from reservoirs.
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NEWS
September 23, 1990 | From Reuters
Thousands of protesters angry at South Korean government moves to relax curbs on farm imports fought with riot police in Seoul on Saturday when they were prevented from demonstrating, witnesses said. A police spokesman in Seoul said 1,665 farmers, students and dissidents were detained, but that most of them would be released with warnings. A police van was set afire during the clash, but there were no reports of serious injuries.
BUSINESS
March 16, 1995
The Republic of Korea has shown impressive economic growth over the past 25 years, largely because of a sustained program of export-oriented policies. One of the world's poorest countries only a generation ago, South Korea is now the United States' seventh-largest trading partner and the world's 12th-largest economy.
BUSINESS
October 28, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Farmers Protest U.S. Rice Imports: Farmers across South Korea stopped work Friday and some burned sacks of U.S. rice to drive home demands for a continuing ban on rice imports despite pressure from Washington for Seoul to open its market. Witnesses in Naju, 170 miles south of Seoul, said farmers burned rice during a rally that drew about 2,000 demonstrators chanting: "We don't want American rice." Farmers were also demanding a higher price for their rice.
BUSINESS
October 14, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
New Talks on Farm Subsidies Scheduled: Japan, South Korea and the 12-nation European Community are expecting to redefine their positions on farm subsidy issues at a new round of talks Wednesday with Arthur Dunkel, director-general of the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade. The 103-nation Uruguay Round talks became deadlocked in December when the EC, and to a lesser extent Japan, refused to agree to big cuts in farm subsidies.
NEWS
April 30, 1988 | SAM JAMESON, Times Staff Writer
In the old warehouse that he remodeled into a four-room home, Kim Jin Hwang pulls out a pile of English-language pamphlets to show how he has taught himself to be a cattle farmer. Kim, 39, a youthful-looking former army captain, is proud of his accomplishment. By struggling through the pamphlets, issued by American breeders, Kim, who does not speak English, has learned all about such matters as breeding and artificial insemination.
BUSINESS
August 21, 1989 | SAM JAMESON, Times Staff Writer
Farmers here, after generations of passivity, are becoming increasingly activist, blaming the government for their heavy debts--and even for their failure to find wives. Yu Dong Son, 27, and his 80-year-old grandmother run a 2 1/2-acre farm in this area 72 miles south of Seoul. It is more than twice as big as neighboring farms, but it no longer produces enough to keep Yu out of debt, he said. Starting with a loan of $450 seven years ago, his debt has grown to $6,000, he said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 20, 1989 | JOHN H. LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
While assuring local business and civic leaders that he wants improved trade relations with the United States, South Korean President Roh Tae Woo on Thursday gently chided the United States, and Los Angeles, for not taking full advantage of the South Korean markets that are open.
BUSINESS
December 9, 1993 | JOHN M. BRODER and JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
South Korean President Kim Young-sam said today that his nation will allow rice imports in order to help bring the global, multilateral free-trade talks to a conclusion. In an apologetic statement made during a special live television broadcast in Seoul, Kim said his government had done everything possible to protect the nation's 6.5 million farmers and its rice market.
NEWS
December 1, 1992 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Park Bong Sung, 57, represents the fifth generation of his family to farm a small plot of land in this rural area of southwest South Korea--and maybe the last. A nuclear power site that now holds two plants, with two more under construction, started operations a mile away six years ago. And since then, Park has had trouble selling his crops of rice and red peppers.
BUSINESS
October 28, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Farmers Protest U.S. Rice Imports: Farmers across South Korea stopped work Friday and some burned sacks of U.S. rice to drive home demands for a continuing ban on rice imports despite pressure from Washington for Seoul to open its market. Witnesses in Naju, 170 miles south of Seoul, said farmers burned rice during a rally that drew about 2,000 demonstrators chanting: "We don't want American rice." Farmers were also demanding a higher price for their rice.
BUSINESS
October 14, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
New Talks on Farm Subsidies Scheduled: Japan, South Korea and the 12-nation European Community are expecting to redefine their positions on farm subsidy issues at a new round of talks Wednesday with Arthur Dunkel, director-general of the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade. The 103-nation Uruguay Round talks became deadlocked in December when the EC, and to a lesser extent Japan, refused to agree to big cuts in farm subsidies.
NEWS
September 23, 1990 | From Reuters
Thousands of protesters angry at South Korean government moves to relax curbs on farm imports fought with riot police in Seoul on Saturday when they were prevented from demonstrating, witnesses said. A police spokesman in Seoul said 1,665 farmers, students and dissidents were detained, but that most of them would be released with warnings. A police van was set afire during the clash, but there were no reports of serious injuries.
BUSINESS
September 13, 1990 | From Reuters
South Korea will not budge from its refusal to open its market to foreign rice and will keep price controls on rice to protect its farmers, an agriculture ministry official said Wednesday. Kim Jong-yong, the ministry's director general for international cooperation, told reporters that Seoul was forced to ask for special concessions to keep its rice market closed. The current round of negotiations under the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade aims to liberalize global trade.
BUSINESS
September 11, 1989 | MARIA L. La GANGA, Times Staff Writer
It was a week filled with contrasts: On Aug. 29, a five-member South Korean delegation awarded a $2.36-million contract to Kolon California Corp. of Long Beach to export 700 metric tons of grain-fed American beef to the Asian nation. Seven days later, dozens of South Korean farmers marched in protest outside a Seoul hotel, demanding the cancellation of an American food fair that they contended signals the U.S. invasion of South Korea's agricultural market.
NEWS
December 1, 1992 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Park Bong Sung, 57, represents the fifth generation of his family to farm a small plot of land in this rural area of southwest South Korea--and maybe the last. A nuclear power site that now holds two plants, with two more under construction, started operations a mile away six years ago. And since then, Park has had trouble selling his crops of rice and red peppers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 20, 1989 | JOHN H. LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
While assuring local business and civic leaders that he wants improved trade relations with the United States, South Korean President Roh Tae Woo on Thursday gently chided the United States, and Los Angeles, for not taking full advantage of the South Korean markets that are open.
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