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NEWS
October 12, 1987 | SAM JAMESON, Times Staff Writer
Kim Dae Jung declared Sunday that he wants to run for president to deny "politically motivated military leaders" a veto power over whom the South Korean people can elect as their leader. Aides called Kim's statement, made to a crowd of about 120,000 people at a rally in this bedroom suburb of Seoul, a de facto proclamation of his candidacy, which he is expected to announce formally later this week.
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NEWS
June 13, 2001 | From Associated Press
Soldiers in South Korea put down their guns Tuesday and picked up buckets and water hoses to fight a new enemy: drought. Facing its worst dry spell in 90 years--and a threat to its staple food, rice--South Korea mobilized a fifth of its total military force to help farms. The 130,000 troops were dispatched to 90 hard-hit regions, armed with drilling machines, trucks, excavators and pumping motors to dig wells or draw water from reservoirs.
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NEWS
December 8, 1987 | SAM JAMESON and DAVID HOLLEY, Times Staff Writers
Amid indications that the ruling party's candidate is falling behind, a U.S. diplomat reiterated Monday that the United States is opposed to any intervention by South Korea's armed forces in the presidential election scheduled for Dec. 16. The diplomat's statement, made on condition that he not be identified by name, was the second such warning in a week. "We believe the election process should be culminated according to procedures," the diplomat said.
NEWS
February 12, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
South Korean soldiers killed large numbers of unarmed civilians--mostly the elderly and children--during the Vietnam War, a state-run TV station reported. Quoting survivors and veterans, accounts of the killings have been circulating in South Korea for years but have never been investigated during Seoul's past military regimes. According to the report, South Korean soldiers rounded up and gunned down scores or hundreds of villagers in Vietnam suspected of harboring guerrillas.
NEWS
February 19, 1987 | From Reuters
The United States and South Korea will begin huge joint military maneuvers today despite protests from North Korea, which charges that the scheduled 10-week exercise is a preparation for war. About 200,000 American and South Korean troops will take part in Team Spirit 87, the latest edition of annual exercises first staged on the peninsula in 1976. The exercise is billed as the largest in the non-communist world. Units from U.S.
NEWS
February 16, 1990 | JOHN M. BRODER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S. and South Korean officials announced Thursday that the United States will withdraw part of its armed force here and gradually relinquish its dominant role in the military alliance between the two countries, eventually turning over all major commands to South Korean officers. The plan disclosed by Defense Secretary Dick Cheney and South Korean Defense Minister Lee Sang Hoon would fundamentally alter the 37-year-old security arrangement between the two countries.
NEWS
September 6, 1990 | KARL SCHOENBERGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An attempt to forge a new chapter in relations on the divided Korean peninsula appeared headed toward the same old impasse as the prime ministers of North and South Korea prepared to hold a second day of talks today. The ball was arguably in the Seoul government's court. Success of the talks may hinge on how well the South Korean side can respond to key demands by the North that it consider joint entry into the United Nations, cease military maneuvers with U.S.
NEWS
March 21, 1988
North Korea ordered a full combat alert of all its armed forces in response to current U.S.-South Korean military maneuvers, the official North Korean News Agency said. "This is a self-defense measure to cope with the new war provocation moves of the U.S. imperialists and the South Korean military clique," the news agency said.
NEWS
January 29, 1988 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., Times Staff Writer
U.S. and South Korean troops will conduct their annual major military exercise this March on the tense Korean Peninsula despite warnings from the north, a spokesman for the Combined Forces Command announced Thursday. At least 200,000 troops will take part in the annual Team Spirit maneuvers, including about 60,000 Americans. The more than 40,000 U.S. servicemen stationed here will be joined by other units based in the United States and elsewhere in the Pacific.
NEWS
February 5, 1989 | From Associated Press
North Korea accused South Korea of committing a military provocation Saturday by sending four warships into its territorial waters. The north's official Korean Central News Agency, monitored in Tokyo, said the ships sailed deep into its waters off North Korea's western coast before turning south when a North Korean patrol boat approached. The report did not say whether any shots were fired. It was the third reported incident between the two in eight days.
NEWS
September 23, 1996 | From Reuters
South Korean troops shot dead a civilian by mistake today as they hunted for an estimated five North Korean infiltrators still on the run, a military official said. Kang Chang Shik told a news conference that the victim, a 56-year-old man, was spotted by security forces just after dawn walking in the mountains near an area where clashes had occurred sporadically during the night. "He was going to pick wild mushrooms," Kang said. "Troops opened fire after sighting him."
NEWS
February 23, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
South Korean security forces arrested three ex-generals for their alleged role in smashing a pro-democracy uprising in which at least 240 people were killed. So far, 14 former generals, including two former presidents, have been detained on charges relating to the 1980 crackdown in the southern city of Kwangju. Those arrested were legislator Park Joon Byong, former Defense Minister Choi Se Chang and former chief presidential bodyguard Chang Se Dong.
NEWS
April 1, 1994 | Research by CHRIS ERSKINE / Los Angeles Times
American forces have been on duty in South Korea for more than 40 years, standing guard over an armistice agreement that never evolved into a permanent peace treaty. With tensions rising over North Korea's nuclear intensions, more U.S. troops and equipment are on the way. U.S. military commanders say the move is larely for logistical reasons, allowing easy movement of U.S. equipment on a non-emergency basis.
NEWS
May 2, 1993 | Associated Press
A former South Korean air force chief was arrested Saturday for allegedly taking $23,000 in bribes from five officers seeking promotion. Prosecutors said Chung Yong Hu is charged with taking the promotion-related bribes while he served as the air force chief of staff from 1989 to 1990. Two navy commodores were arrested Saturday on charges of buying their promotions. No details on those two cases were immediately available.
BUSINESS
July 8, 1991 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Faced with a serious imbalance in the labor market, the South Korean government has decided to place military conscripts in civilian jobs at small companies. Beginning Sept. 1, draftees exempted from regular army service but required to perform auxiliary military duties will be allowed to sign up for five years of work in factories, on construction jobs or as merchant seaman, said Ahn Hee Won, director of manpower planning at the Economic Planning Board.
NEWS
October 8, 1990 | From Times staff and Wire reports
President Roh Tae Woo fired his defense minister and the powerful chief of military intelligence following allegations that the government spied on more than 1,300 civilians. Roh's office said that Defense Minister Lee Sang Hoon was replaced by Lee Jong Koo, former army chief of staff. Lt. Gen. Cho Nam Pung gave way as commander of the Defense Security Command in favor of Lt. Gen. Koo Chang Hoe.
NEWS
September 6, 1990 | KARL SCHOENBERGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An attempt to forge a new chapter in relations on the divided Korean peninsula appeared headed toward the same old impasse as the prime ministers of North and South Korea prepared to hold a second day of talks today. The ball was arguably in the Seoul government's court. Success of the talks may hinge on how well the South Korean side can respond to key demands by the North that it consider joint entry into the United Nations, cease military maneuvers with U.S.
NEWS
February 16, 1990 | JOHN M. BRODER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S. and South Korean officials announced Thursday that the United States will withdraw part of its armed force here and gradually relinquish its dominant role in the military alliance between the two countries, eventually turning over all major commands to South Korean officers. The plan disclosed by Defense Secretary Dick Cheney and South Korean Defense Minister Lee Sang Hoon would fundamentally alter the 37-year-old security arrangement between the two countries.
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